Found 268 articles starting with A:

alleged - correct spelling

alleged verb (past tense and past participle of the verb allege) and adjective...

Allude vs. Elude

He eluded to the problem but did not mention it. ...

Allude vs. Elude

Another set of words I get asked about frequently is the difference between allude and elude. Even though th...

allude, elude

Allude means “to refer to something indirectly or covertly” without actually naming it. The confusion here might come from the fact that elude means “to evade or escape.” They both can imply an elem...

Allusion vs. Illusion

The nouns allusion and illusion sound quite similar, and they both have connotations of intangibility. As a result, they are sometimes confused by writers. Consider the sentences be...

Allusion vs. Illusion #2

It’s not always easy to remember the meanings of English words. English contains many words borrowed or angl...

allusion, illusion

Allusion is a noun form of the verb allude and means “a reference to something indirectly or covertly.“An illusion ...

almost

Place almost directly before the word it modifies.The following is incorrect: There was almost a threatening edge to his voice....

almost - correct spelling

almost adverbExample: He has read almost every novel by John Grisham. adverb (modifying the adjective every)...

along with

See coupled with, as well as, along with, together with, not to mention....

alot, a lot, allot

The word lot is a one-word noun. When you precede it with the article a, you write the expression as two words: a lot. You wouldn’t refer to a tree as ...

Aloud vs. Allowed

English has plenty of homophones, but two of the most easily confused homophones are aloud and allowed. These two words give even experienced writers trouble. If you make this mistake in a text message or a post on social media, ...

already - correct spelling

already adverbNote: The two-word expression all ready means “entirely ready” or “prepared.” The one-word expression already means “previously” or “so soon.” Though indistinguis...

alright - correct spelling

alright The word alright is misspelled. See all right.See Grammar.com's section on Problem Words for a discussion of ...

Alternately vs. Alternatively

English is a complicated language and some very closely resembling words of English have meanings that are amazingly different from each other. Alternately and alternatively are two words that have only a slight difference in the...

although - correct spelling

although subordinating conjunctionNote: The conjunctions although and though are generally interchangeable. You should use though, however, when it’...

altogether - correct spelling

altogether adverbNote: The two-word expression all together means “in a group.” The one-word expression altogether means “wholly, entirely, completely.” Though indistinguishabl...

Altogether vs. All together

It was an altoge...

Aluminium vs. Aluminum

English is a complicated language and it may confuse its learners and native speakers alike due to some very similar words or words that have more than one spellings. Aluminium and aluminum are an example of such words and many p...

always - correct spelling

always adverbExample: He always works on weekends....

amateur - correct spelling

amateur noun and adjectiveExample: As an amateur, Tiger Woods played at Augusta National. noun...

Amber and Igor - Primitive Ancestors

You might think of nouns as naming words. It’s not hard to see why our primitive ancestors dreamed them up, at roughly the same time my eighth-grade English teacher, Miss Hamrick, came on the scene. When we used to grunt at one another in caves, mama...

Ambiance vs. Ambience

Let’s say you are trying to choose a restaurant for an anniversary dinner with your spouse. You will want to select a location that has an environment or atmosphere that you will both enjoy. You notice that some online reviews us...

amenable - vocabulary

amenable - adjective Willing or ready to answer, serve, agree, yield, or act; agreeable, tractable; legally responsible or answerable, as in She was amenable for her husband’s debt. ...

Amend vs. Emend

Every once in a while writers come across a set of words that are so similar to each other that they aren’t sure what the difference is. Either that or they use the words so infrequently that they forgot (or never knew to begin w...

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