Found 157 articles starting with D:

daily - correct spelling

daily adjective, adverb, and nounExample: He read his daily newspaper. adjectiv...

daiquiri - correct spelling

daiquiri nounExample: She ordered a strawberry daiquiri....

Dairy vs. Diary

Dairy and diary are confusing because they are spelled with the same letters, but with the two vowels revers...

Dalmatian - correct spelling

Dalmatian Proper nounNot Dalmation.Example: The Dalmatian rode in the fire truck.Example: The young ...

dangling modifier

A dangling modifier is a phrase or clause that does not hook up to any other word or phrase in the sentence. The dangling modifier is a gross grammatical error, one you want to avoid.The error typically arises with ...

dangling participle

 See dangling modifier....

data

In formal writing, it’s probably best to treat this word as a plural. Thus: the data are.The singular is ...

data, datum - vocabulary

data, datum - noun Facts, statistics, or items of information. Note:Data is a plural of datum, which is originally a Latin noun meaning “something given.” Today, dat...

Dates - Day-Month-Year

If you depict dates by day-month-year, not month-day-year, do not use commas. Make certain you use a consistent system throughout the document. Those disliking the required commas for month-day-year expressions used as adjectives (e.g., "your July 1,...

Dates - Month-Day-Year

Comma After the YearWhen you indicate month, day, and year, put a comma after the day and after the year (unless some other punctuation mark, like a period or question mark, follows the year). Include these commas even if the...

Dates - Month-Year

If you omit the day and just include the month and year, do not use a comma: In January 1945 he was born in a large southern city. We now wish to respond to your July 2006 letter....

daughter - correct spelling

daughter nounExample: Their daughter learned to speak at an early age....

dauntless - vocabulary

dauntless - adjective Fearless, intrepid, bold. For Thought has a pair of dauntless wings.—Robert Frost ”Bond and Free” (1920) Note: You may ...

daybreak - correct spelling

daybreak nounExample: We talked until daybreak....

dearth - vocabulary

dearth - noun Scarcity, inadequate supply (usually of something desirable). Reverence is the highest quality of man’s nature; and that individual, or nation, which has it slightly developed, is so far unfo...

death - correct spelling

death nounExample: “Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me….” —Emily Dickinson....

debase - vocabulary

debase - verb To lower in character or virtue, to reduce in value or quality, as in The Fed debased the dollar; to lower in rank, significance, or dignity. Hygiene is the corruption of medicine by...

debt - correct spelling

debt nounExample: Consumers continue to take on more and more debt....

Deceased vs. Diseased

English has a lot of confusing words in it. Some words are spelled the same with different meanings, some wo...

deceive - correct spelling

deceive verbExample: My eyes deceive me.Example: She tried to deceive her...

December - correct spelling

December proper nounExample: The oil drilling will start this December....

decent - correct spelling

decent adjectiveNot descent.Example: After college, he got a fairly decent...

deception - correct spelling

deception nounExample: Clever research by the CFO uncovered the CEO’s deception....

decide - correct spelling

decide verbExample: We want to decide this issue now....

decimate - vocabulary

decimate - verb To destroy a measurable or large proportion of.Note: Originally, decimate meant to select by lot and execute every tenth soldier of a unit. But the current usage of the wo...

decision - correct spelling

decision nounExample: The court reached a decision in favor of the plaintiff....

decisive - correct spelling

decisive adjectiveExample: His decisive action saved the company from ruin....

decorous - vocabulary

decorous - adjective Characterized by dignity, good manners, good taste, appropriateness.Note: Decorum is the noun form. But, by a curious twist, ...

deduce - vocabulary

deduce - verb To derive or draw as a conclusion by reasoning from given premises or principles. In no department are American universities weaker than in the department of English. The æsthetic opinion tha...

deed - correct spelling

deed noun and verbExample: “No good deed goes unpunished.” * nounExample: The cove...

Defence vs. Defense

The words defence and defense can be confusing for those not sure of their differences, and not knowing which to use can cause a writer to second-guess his or her work, even though there might not be anything wrong with it. Do th...

defendant - correct spelling

defendant nounExample: The defendant refused to testify, pleading his rights under the Fifth Amendment. noun...

deferred - correct spelling

deferred verb (past tense and past participle of the verb defer) and adjectiveExample: We ...

defining clause

The great grammarian Henry Fowler coined this term to refer to a restrictive clause. A defining clause looks to the noun modified and singles it out among others that could exist in the context. A defining clause poi...

definite - correct spelling

definite adjectiveNot definate.Note: The adjectives definite and definitive both describe something precisely defined or explicitly set forth. The word ...

definite article

We have three articles in the English language: a, an, and the. The word the is the definite article. The words a and an are indefinite articles.Grammaria...

definitely - correct spelling

definitely adverbGrammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that di...

definition - correct spelling

definition nounExample: His definition of the word profit confused the shareholders.Example: In the rain, the sce...

definitive - correct spelling

definitive adjectiveNote: The adjectives definite and definitive both describe something precisely defined or explicitly set forth. The word definitive, however, re...

Defuse vs. Diffuse

The bomb squad d...

degradation - vocabulary

degradation - noun Diminution, as of strength or magnitude; changing to a lower or less respected state.Note: Degrade is the verb form. [Former U.S. Se...

deign - vocabulary

deign - verb To deem worthy of notice or account; to think it appropriate to one’s dignity. No professor, so far as I know, has ever deigned to give the same sober attention to the se...

deleterious - vocabulary

deleterious - adjective Harmful or injurious, morally or physically. I will follow that system of regimen which, according to my ability and judgment, I consider for the benefit of my patients, and ab...

delicious - correct spelling

delicious adjectiveExample: The child munched on the delicious apple....

delineate - vocabulary

delineate - verb To represent by sketch or diagram; to trace the outline of; sketch or trace in outline; to represent pictorially, as in She delineated the state of New York on the map with a blue pencil. To port...

demagogue - vocabulary

demagogue - noun An orator or politician who gains popularity and power by arousing emotions, passions, and prejudices.Note: Also used as a verb. We shall achie...

demonstrable, demonstrative - vocabulary

demonstrable, demonstrative - adjective Demonstrable: capable of being demonstrated by positive proof; clearly evident or obvious. It is plain and demonstrable...

demonstrative pronoun

We have four demonstrative pronouns in the English language: this, that, these, those. The first two are singular, the last two plural. Demonstrative pronouns take the place of a noun, and when you use them, make sure the ...

demure, demur

Demure is an adjective used to describe someone who is reserved, modest, or shy.Demur is a verb that means “to delay” or “to object.” Lawyers will use demur to desc...

denizen - vocabulary

denizen - noun Inhabitant or resident; one who frequently inhabits a place, as in the denizens of the local pub. A tanned skin is something more than respectable, and perhaps olive is a fitter col...

denote - vocabulary

denote - verb To indicate, to be a sign of, as in A rise in the price of gold often denotes a fall in the U.S. dollar. Note: Denote and connote ...

denouement - vocabulary

denouement - noun The final resolution of a plot or play; also used to describe the ultimate outcome of a doubtful series of events. A young professor I watched in action at one of our large ea...

Denounce vs. Renounce

There are a lot of English words with similar meanings, spelling, pronunciations, etc., and they all serve t...

Dependant vs. Dependent

Because American and British English sometimes have different spellings for the same word, beginning writers...

dependent - correct spelling

dependent adjective and nounExample: Our success is dependent on our willingness to work. adjective...

dependent clause

Clauses come in two varieties: independent and dependent. A dependent clause cannot stand by itself as a sentence. Dependent clauses will act in one of three ways in your sentences: (1) adjectives, (2) ...

deposit - correct spelling

deposit noun and verbExample: She put the bank deposit in an envelope. nounExample: ...

deprecate - vocabulary

deprecate - verb To express disapproval of; to belittle.Note: The word deprecate has come to mean depreciate (to belittle), though the words share no common origins. Rarely do we...

derelict - correct spelling

derelict adjective and nounExample: We saw a derelict ship off the coast of North   Carolina. adjecti...

derivative adjective

A derivative adjective derives from a verb form. You can take certain suffixes (‑ful, ‑ent,‑ant, ‑ive, and others), add them to verbs, and produce derivative adjectives. The word derivative in derivative adjective is, you g...

derivative noun

A derivative noun derives from a verb form. You can take certain suffixes (‑tion, ‑sion, ‑ence, ‑ance, and others), add them to verbs, and produce derivative nouns. Examples include conclusion, statement, pertinence...

descend - correct spelling

descend verbExample: The jet was finally able to descend and land safely....

descent - correct spelling

descent nounNot decent.Example: The bumpy descent of the plane unsettled th...

describe - correct spelling

describe verbExample: He tried to describe the beauty of the sunset and the Florida palms....

description - correct spelling

description nounExample: The description of the house attracted the young couple....

desert - correct spelling

desert noun, adjective, and verbNot dessert.Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses ...

Desert vs. Dessert

I would love to enjoy a cold dessert in a desert. ...

desiccate - correct spelling

desiccate verbExample: The burning sun will desiccate the new plants in her garden....

desirable - correct spelling

desirable adjectiveExample: The company found a desirable location for its new store....

despair - correct spelling

despair noun and verbExample: The irresponsible young boy was the despair of his parents and friends. noun...

desperate - correct spelling

desperate adjectiveExample: The desperate criminal tried to take a hostage....

despot, despotism - vocabulary

despot, despotism - noun Despot: a monarch or other rule with absolute power; a tyrant or oppressor.Despotism: rule by an autocratic government; tyranny; a count...

dessert - correct spelling

dessert nounNot desert.Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses desert and dessert. ...

dessert, desert

A dessert is something you eat after dinner.A desert is a hot place with a lot of sand. Desert can also be used as a verb meaning “...

destruction - correct spelling

destruction nounExample: The hurricane left the city in a state of total destruction.Example: “We’re on the eve of ...

determine - correct spelling

determine verbExample: We must determine how the accountant stole our inheritance....

deterrence - correct spelling

deterrence nounExample: The theory of deterrence doesn't work very well with career criminals....

develop - correct spelling

develop verbNot develope.Example: The real-estate company planned to develop the property with large, unsightly houses....

Developing Your Love Affair

Falling in Love with the VerbPowerful words, these verbs. Maybe that’s why Hugo once said, “The word is the verb, and the verb is God.”Verb PowerPretty neat, these verbs. They aren’t content t...

development - correct spelling

development nounNot developement.Example: The rising price of gold was a discouraging development for the value of the dollar....

device - correct spelling

device nounNot devise.Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses device and devise. ...

Device vs. Devise

It is very easy to make spelling errors. Not even the most experienced writers are immune to these simple, b...

devise - correct spelling

devise verbNot device.Grammar.com’s Section on Problem Words discusses device and devise. ...

devise, device

To devise means “to formulate a plan.” In the law, devise means “to give away land or other real property in a will.”A device is something that is made to serve a s...

Dialog vs. Dialogue

I wrote a dialogue between a customer and a shopkeeper. ...

Dialogue vs. Dialog

If you were a novelist or a playwright, what word would you use to describe a conversation between two or mo...

diary, dairy

A diary is a written record of daily events.A dairy is a place that produces milk or milk products. Dairy is also used as an ...

dictator - correct spelling

dictator nounExample: The Korean dictator apologized for his nuclear tests....

dictionary - correct spelling

dictionary nounExample: She consulted the dictionary to find the meaning of the word dictionary....

didactic - vocabulary

didactic - adjective Pertaining to teaching, intended for instruction; inclined to teach or lecture (to excess), as in a boring, didactic speaker. A didactic play attempts to...

died - correct spelling

died verb (past tense and past participle of the verb die)Not dyed.Examp...

difference - correct spelling

difference nounExample: There’s a big difference between the two candidates’ views on taxes....

different - correct spelling

different adjectiveGrammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses different from vs. different than. Click ...

different from, different than

Although both of these phrases are common today, some believe that different than is always incorrect. The reason is easy to understand. The word than follows a ...

diffident - vocabulary

diffident - adjective Lacking confidence in one’s own ability or worth; timid, shy. [Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady] is bland on television and awkward as a public speaker. In a city of bombast ...

dilatory - vocabulary

dilatory - adjective Tending to delay or procrastinate; tardy, slow. Diligence increaseth the fruit of toil. A dilatory man wrestles with losses.—Hesiod Works an...

dilemma - correct spelling

dilemma nounExample: She found herself on the horns of a dilemma.** “The original dilemma in rhetoric was a device by which you pr...

dilettante - vocabulary

dilettante - noun One who engages in art or other subject for amusement, usually in a desultory or superficial way; a dabbler. Also used to refer to a lover of the fine arts. The second reason for his dela...

diminution - vocabulary

diminution - noun The process, act, or fact of lessening or diminishing; reduction.Note: The adjective form diminutive often refers to people or things that are s...

dining - correct spelling

dining verb (present participle of the verb dine)Example: He was dining with friends when he heard the n...

dinner - correct spelling

dinner nounExample: She came to our house for dinner....

Dinner vs. Diner

When words have several related meanings, you have to rely on context to parse the meaning of a sentence. Wh...

direct object

Action verbs come in two varieties: transitive and intransitive. A transitive verb has the intrinsic ability to attach directly to a noun, and that noun is called the direct object...

direction - correct spelling

direction nounExample: The ship sailed in a northern direction.Example: Parents must provide the proper ...

disappear - correct spelling

disappear verbExample: The magician made his assistant disappear....

disappearance - correct spelling

disappearance nounExample: Since her disappearance, the company lost its purpose and energy....

disappoint - correct spelling

disappoint verbExample: These earnings will disappoint the shareholders....

disappointment - correct spelling

disappointment nounExample: The loss was a major disappointment to his supporters....

disapproval - correct spelling

disapproval nounExample: Her disapproval of his behavior was immediately apparent....

disapprove - correct spelling

disapprove verbExample: The bank will disapprove the loan application. transitive verbExample: ...

disastrous - correct spelling

disastrous adjectiveExample: The financial results were disastrous, and the stock price plummeted....

discipline - correct spelling

discipline noun and verbExample: The young mother will provide gentle discipline for her child. noun...

discomfit - vocabulary

discomfit - verb Discomfit, to confuse, disconcert; to thwart, to frustrate the plans of, to foil. Whether the issue is birth control or global warming or clean air, this administration has alread...

discover - correct spelling

discover verbExample: After we discover the culprit, we can alert the police....

Discreet vs. Discrete

The government’s discreet decision about the four discrete divisions caused a ...

Discreet vs. Discrete

It’s easy to mix up these two words; discreet and discrete, in English writing. They are a set of homophones...

discreet, discrete

To be discreet means to be “modest” or “prudent.”To be discrete means to be “obviously separate” or “distinct.” Discrete also has a specific meaning in mathematics ...

discriminate - correct spelling

discriminate verb and adjectiveExample: The laws must not discriminate against people because of their race. ...

disease - correct spelling

disease nounExample: His disease interfered with his work....

disenfranchise - vocabulary

disenfranchise - verb To deprive of any right privilege or power; to deprive of voting rights. From the early indications, Americans are feeling enthusiastic about their constitutionally guaranteed right t...

disingenuous

Consider the following usage note on Dictionary.com:The meaning of disingenuous has been shifting about lately, as if people were unsure of its proper meaning. Generally, it me...

disingenuous - vocabulary

disingenuous See the discussion of ingenuousNote: You may download the Grammar eBook ...

Disinterested vs. Uninterested

Alex brought her disinterested friend to solve the dispute between her and Adam who was uninterested in ...

Disinterested vs. Uninterested

The most vibrant parts of life are colored by nuance. It is simple to say that someone is enthusiastic about...

disinterested, uninterested

To be disinterested means to be “impartial,” “free from bias,” or “indifferent.” A disinterested person has no stake in the outcome.To be uninterested means “having...

disjunctive - vocabulary

disjunctive - adjective Helping or serving to disconnect or separate; dividing; distinguishing.Note: In grammar, disjunctive describes the process of syntactically setting two or mor...

Disk vs. Disc

There are a lot of homophones in English that confuse both native and ESL writers alike. The two words disc ...

Disorganized vs. Unorganized

Do disorganized and unorganized mean the same thing?...

disparage - vocabulary

disparage - verb To regard or speak of slightingly; to belittle; to bring reproach or discredit on. People disparage knowing and the intellectual life, and urge doing. I am content with kn...

dispensable - correct spelling

dispensable adjectiveExample: Unfortunately, she was dispensable and lost her job last year....

Disperse vs. Disburse

Everyday-spoken English is usually considered less formal than written English, and this informality sometim...

dissatisfied - correct spelling

dissatisfied adjective and verb (past tense and past participle of the verb dissatisfy)Example: She gave ...

dissection - correct spelling

dissection nounExample: The students performed a dissection of the poor frog....

dissemble - vocabulary

dissemble - verb To give a misleading or false appearance, to conceal the truth; to feign.Note: Do not confuse dissemble (to hide the truth) with disassemble (to take something a...

disseminate - vocabulary

disseminate - verb To spread or scatter widely, as seed is sown; to distribute, broadcast, disperse, as in disseminate information. "Nations, like individuals, wish to enjoy a fair reputation. It ...

dissipate - correct spelling

dissipate verbExample: The smoke will dissipate when the wind blows....

distance - correct spelling

distance noun and verbExample: Distance makes the heart grow fonder. nounExample: ...

distinction - correct spelling

distinction nounExample: This is a distinction without a difference.Example: He is a man of ...

Distrust vs. Mistrust

Sometimes, two words are so similar that even experienced writers have trouble remembering which is which. D...

Dive Deeper into the English Language with These Tips

Admit it – when someone tells you that he/she’s learning English, and it’s verydifficult, chances are that you don’t help or comfort them by giving some tips,sharing your personal hacks or doing anything that can make the s...

division - correct spelling

division nounExample: For efficiency, we relied on a division of labor.Example: Send your complaint to the customer-relati...

doctor - correct spelling

doctor noun and verbExample: My son, the doctor, treats small children. nounExample: ...

dogma, dogmatic, dogmatize - vocabulary

dogma, dogmatic, dogmatize - noun, adjective, verb  nounDogma: a systems of tenets or principles...

dollar - correct spelling

dollar nounExample: The U.S. dollar is a fiat currency.Example: The newspaper costs a ...

dominant - correct spelling

dominant adjectiveExample: She played the dominant role in the company’s success....

Donut vs. Doughnut

Everyone enjoys a doughnut every now and then—glazed, powdered, sprinkled, jelly filled. It’s hard not to lo...

doubt - correct spelling

doubt verb and nounExample: We started to doubt our convictions. verbExample: Her ...

dough - correct spelling

dough nounExample: She kneaded the dough and baked some fabulous bread.Example: He was broke. He had no ...

doughty - correct spelling

doughty adjectiveExample: The doughty soldier charged the enemy’s position....

Download Grammar eBooks

Besides, we've kept the prices of our Grammar eBooks low. Very low.Safe and Secure: Downloads are safe and secure. Also, we will keep your name and email address private...

dozen - correct spelling

dozen noun and adjectiveExample: A dozen should be enough. nounExample: We or...

Drier vs. Dryer

Some words sound alike but don’t mean the same thing. Such words are called homophones, and they are common ...

drunkenness - correct spelling

drunkenness nounNot drunkeness.Example: His drunkenness caused him to lose control of the car....

Dual vs. Duel

Dual and duel are a pair of homophones which means that both the words spell and sound almost similar but their meanings are entirely different from each other. Homophones are usual...

dumbbell - correct spelling

dumbbell nounNot dumbell.Example: The weightlifter used a 100-pound dumbbell.Example: By all accounts, th...

duplicity - vocabulary

duplicity - noun Deceitfulness in conduct or speech; speaking and acting in two different, opposing ways; a twofold or double quality or state.Note: The adjective dupl...

dyed - correct spelling

dyed verb (past tense and past participle of the verb dye)See died.Example: ...

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