Found 148 articles starting with I:

incomparable, uncomparable

The prefix ‑in in incomparable serves as an intensive. Thus, incomparable means “so good as to be beyond comparison.” The -un in uncom...

increase - correct spelling

increase - verb and noun  Example: These additional sales will increase the company’s profits. verb...

incredible - correct spelling

incredible - adjective  Example: His incredible alibi failed to convince the police....

incredulous, incredible

The word incredulous means “skeptical” or “disbelieving.”The word incredible means “implausible” or “unbelievable.” It is often used, indeed overused, to describe something ...

indefinite article

We have three articles in the English language: a, an, and the. The words a and an are the indefinite articles. The word the is the definite article.Indefin...

indefinite pronoun

Indefinite pronouns enable us to refer to any one, any two, several, or all in a group or class of persons or things or ideas. Examples include: all, another, anyone, each, someone, everybody, none, others. Some of the pronouns have possessi...

independence - correct spelling

independence - noun  Example: During college, she relished her independence from her parents....

independent - correct spelling

independent - adjective  Example: The independent prosecutor will investigate the allegations....

independent clause

A clause is a group of words with a conjugated verb in it. We have two kinds of clauses: independent and dependent. An independent clause is a complete sentence. It begins with a capital letter and ends with a period or other terminal punctuation mar...

indexes, indices

The preferred plural is indexes. Use indices when you mean “indicators.” Scientists and mathematicians, however, prefer indices in technical writing.Example...

indicative mood

First, understand this: The word mood has nothing to do with frame of mind, as in happy or sad. It actually refers to mode, which is the attribute of a verb suggesting the speaker's attitude toward the action expressed.The m...

Indices vs. Indexes

When words have more than one variant, choosing between them can be difficult. Often, there is no hard and f...

indicted - correct spelling

indicted - verb (past tense and past participle of the verb indict)  Example: The grand jury ...

indirect object

The indirect object is a person or thing secondarily affected by the action of the verb, the direct object being primarily affected. The indirect object appears in the sentence as a nou...

indispensable - correct spelling

indispensable - adjective  Not indispensible.Example: His putter was the indispensable club in his golf...

indolent - vocabulary

adjectiveLaziness; having or showing a disposition to avoid exertion or work. In pathology, causing little or no pain, as in an indolent sore slow to heal. Miss Bingley was engrossed by Mr. Da...

Indorsement vs. Endorsement

English contains many uncommon words that are only used in specific contexts. In some cases, these words may...

ineffable - vocabulary

adjectiveIncapable of being expressed or described in words, as in ineffable joy; not to be spoken because of its sacredness, unutterable, as in the ineffable name of the deity. He be...

Inequality vs. Inequity

If you’ve ever had a case of writer’s block from choosing between two very similar words in your writing, yo...

inevitable - correct spelling

inevitable - adjective  Example: With his hard work, his success became inevitable....

inexorable - vocabulary

adjectiveUnalterable, unyielding, as in an inexorable truth; unrelenting, not to be moved, persuaded, affected by entreaties or prayers, as in an inexorable bill collector. And never ...

infer, imply - vocabulary

verbInfer: to derive by reasoning, to conclude or judge from evidence or premises.Imply: to suggest or indicate a conclusion without its being explicitly stated; ...

Infinitive - The "to" Verb

Academic tomes might go on for pages defining the meaning of the infinitive form of a verb. I, on the other hand, have developed a definition requiring only a single sentence:The infinitive form of a verb is the one you would ordinari...

infinitive phrase

Every verb has a base infinitive form. We think of the infinitive as the verb with the preposition to in front of it, as in to have, to hold, to love, to honor, to cherish. Infinitive phrases can act as (1) nouns...

infinitive verb

Every verb has a base infinitive form. We think of the infinitive as the verb with the preposition to in front of it: as in to have, to hold, to love, to honor, to cherish. Infinitives appear in t...

Discuss these letter quotes with the community:


We need you!

Help us build the largest grammar knowledge base and articles collection on the web!

Improve your writing now:

Download Grammar eBooks

It’s now more important than ever to develop a powerful writing style. After all, most communication takes place in reports, emails, and instant messages.