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Benefitted vs. Benefited

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Many writers are flummoxed at the spelling rules in English. In some cases, the consonant at the end of a word is doubled when adding a suffix, like in the words knit and knitting. Other times, the consonant is left alone, as with the words spite and spited. To make matters even more confusing, some words can follow either strategy, like the verb benefit when conjugated into the past tense, forming either benefited or benefitted. How should you spell this word? This article will cover the situations where each of these spellings might be considered more appropriate.

In this post, I will compare benefited vs. benefitted. I will outline each spelling, explaining when it is appropriate to use each. Plus, I will give you a memory tool to help you decide whether to use benefited or benefitted in your own writing.

Origin:

Benefit originated from late Middle English (originally denoting a kind deed or something well done): from Old French bienfet, from Latin benefactum ‘good deed’, from bene facere ‘do good (to)’.

Benefit as noun:

Benefit is used in English language where it means an advantage or profit gained from something.

Enjoy the benefits of being a member.

The members were benefitted most by the program.

Benefit is also a payment made by the state or an insurance scheme to someone entitled to receive it.

Part-time jobs supplemented by means-tested benefits.

An event such as a concert or game, intended to raise money for a particular player or charity is also called benefit.

The social season was highlighted by debutante balls and charity benefits.

Benefit as verb:

Benefit is also used as a verb in English language where it means to receive an advantage; profit.

Areas that would benefit from regeneration.

Use of benefited:

The word benefited is a past-tense form of the verb benefit, which means to confer an advantage. Benefited is the accepted spelling of this word in American English.

Examples:

The agency benefited from additional oversight.

The participants in the experimental group benefited significantly from the treatment.

The candidate had benefited from billions of dollars in free airtime.

His 2015 Clos de la Roilette Cuvée Christal ($18) was a bright, juicy, uncomplicated delight, while his Clos de la Roilette Cuvée Tardive ($25) was a rich, concentrated wine that benefited from decanting. –The Wall Street Journal

Use of benefitted:

Benefitted is an alternate spelling of the same word. It is applicable to all the same contexts as benefited, with the caveat that benefitted is the preferred form in British English.

Examples:

King George VI benefitted from the forbidden love between his elder brother and Wallis Simpson.

Wallis Simpson benefitted from being an engaging conversationalist and marrying into the royal family.

King Edward VIII benefitted from marrying the woman he loved, but it cost him his claim to the throne.

The FT, which strongly favoured Britain remaining in the European Union, has benefitted from the vote to leave on 23 June. –The Guardian

Benefitted or benefited:

Although benefited and benefitted mean the same thing, there are still clearly defined contexts where each is more appropriate. Americans use benefited. British spell the same word benefitted. Your intended audience will be the determining factor for which one you should choose. Since benefitted and Nottinghamshire are each spelled with a double T, remembering that this spelling is standard in English will be a simple task.

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"Benefitted vs. Benefited." Grammar.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 21 Nov. 2017. <http://www.grammar.com/benefitted_vs._benefited>.

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