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Guarantee vs. Guaranty

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In the modern world, guarantees are everywhere. We hear about them in commercials and we read them on product packaging. Sometimes it feels like every aspect of our lives is covered by a guarantee from someone or other. But what about a guaranty? Is this word another way to spell the same term, or does it have its own, separate meaning? Continue reading to learn more.

In this post, I will compare guarantee vs. guaranty. I will include example sentences for each word, so you can see it in its proper context. Plus, I will outline a memory tool that will help you remember whether you need guarantee or guaranty for your own writing.

Origin:

The word guarantee originated from late 17th century (in the sense ‘guarantor’): perhaps from Spanish garante, corresponding to French garant (see warrant), later influenced by French garantie ‘guaranty’.

Guarantee as noun:

Guarantee as noun means a formal assurance (typically in writing) that certain conditions will be fulfilled, especially that a product will be repaired or replaced if not of a specified quality.

We offer a 10-year guarantee against rusting.

Guarantee as verb:

Guarantee is used as a verb which means to provide a formal assurance, especially that certain conditions will be fulfilled relating to a product, service, or transaction.

The company guarantees to refund your money.

Guarantee also means to promise with certainty.

No one can guarantee a profit on stocks and shares.

Guaranty as noun:

Guaranty is related to guarantee, but it is a narrower, more specific term. Guaranty is only used as a noun, where it means a promise to pay money if another party does not. It is mostly used in banking and finance, but is rarely used outside of legal context.

The bank requires a binding guaranty from a separate cosigner.

Examples:

Spain’s Abengoa, facing a cash crunch in the next week, is negotiating a multi-million euro lifeline with creditor banks which have asked the company to guarantee with new assets, sources familiar with the talks said on Monday. (Reuters)

Expedia’s Best Price Guarantee, like most others, looks like a great deal — until you read the fine print. (The Chicago Tribune)

Here are five job-search mistakes that will virtually guarantee you won’t get the job, or even a second glance from employers. (Forbes)

The police department is a paramilitary organization and the Reno City Council should consider how Jason Soto has performed, not whether he meets some artificial standard which has no guarantee of success as a leader. (The Reno Gazette-Journal)

FFELP Loans are insured or guaranteed by state based on guaranty agreements among the United States Department of Education (ED) and these agencies. (Dakota Financial News)

Guarantee or guaranty:

Guarantee and guaranty refer to written agreements. Guarantee can refer to the agreement itself as a noun, and the act of making the agreement as a verb. Guaranty is a specific type of guarantee that is only used as a noun. Guarantees are everywhere, so the shared E between those words is the clue you need to remember that guarantee is applicable to most situations, while guaranty is very specific in scope.

If you ever need more help when choosing guaranty or guarantee, you can check back for a memory jog.

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"Guarantee vs. Guaranty." Grammar.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 24 Nov. 2017. <http://www.grammar.com/guarantee_vs._guaranty>.

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