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insidious, invidious

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Insidious is used to describe something that is subtly harmful or cunningly treacherous. Something is insidious if it lies in wait, seeks to entrap, or operates secretly or subtly so as not to arouse suspicion.

The word invidious means “offensive, repulsive.” The word often refers to discrimination.

Example: The insidious rumors spread by the enemy were so clever that they brought rise to many invidious accusations against Japanese Americans.

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"insidious, invidious." Grammar.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 24 Nov. 2017. <http://www.grammar.com/insidious-invidious>.

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