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Retch vs. Wretch

The English language doesn’t seem to be lacking in synonyms for the verb “vomit.” We have “upchuck,” “puke,” “hurl,” “heave,” and “retch,” to name a few. So do we really need to add another one, even if only as an alternate ...

added by angbeenc
5 days ago

Raise vs. Raze

Homophones are words that share the same pronunciation but differ in spelling and meaning, such as to, too, two; and so, sew, and sow. Homophones and confusingly similar words are the stuff that malapropisms are made of. A malapropism is the unintent...

added by angbeenc
5 days ago

Perspective vs. Prospective

English, like all languages, contains many words which differ from each other by only a few characters, yet have totally different meanings and usage cases. Prospective and perspective are two such words in English. These words are spelled only sligh...

added by angbeenc
5 days ago

Peer vs. Pier

Pier and peer are homophones, meaning they sound alike but are spelled differently, and mean different things. They are also easily confused words. The spell-check application in word-processing software doesn’t catch words that are spelled correct...

added by angbeenc
5 days ago

Peddle vs. Pedal

English spelling is full of apparent idiosyncrasies – native speakers and learners alike grapple with doubling consonants, how to form plurals, ‘i’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c’’, and have to dodge umpteen other potential pitfalls. Anot...

added by angbeenc
5 days ago

Overdo vs. Overdue

Ram is advised by his doctor not to overdo bicep exercises because of his fractured arm. Financial experts believe another recession is inevitable, perhaps even overdue. Though very commonly used, overdo and overdue still are sometimes confusing for ...

added by angbeenc
5 days ago

Moat vs. Mote

There are millions of tiny dust motes in the air. He fell in the moat around the castle. Consider the two sentences above and try to figure out what moat and mote mean from their respective sentences. Can you do that? If so, good for you, but if you ...

added by angbeenc
5 days ago

Corporation vs. Cooperation

English is a distinctive language where many words are so similar that they cause confusion in the readers and writers minds. Cooperation and corporation are an example of such words. Cooperatives and corporations may sound like one and the same thin...

added by angbeenc
12 days ago

Creak vs. Creek

The words creak, creek sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Consider the sentences below: From inside came the creak and moan of a swinging door. Let’s go on down to the creek. Can you tell the meanings of both the words from t...

added by angbeenc
12 days ago

Credible vs. Creditable

Talk about words that can be confused easily … creditable and credible are a prime example.  While they sound alike, and their meanings come close, they are two completely separate terms with definitions that deserve clarity. The student's eff...

added by angbeenc
12 days ago

Current vs. Currant

Homophones can be confusing, and in their misuse, hilarity sometimes ensues. If you write that someone was swept away by the currant and you aren’t relating a cautionary tale of drunken misadventure, then you had probably better read the rest of th...

added by angbeenc
12 days ago

Insight vs. Incite

Homophones are words that share the same pronunciation but differ in spelling and meaning, such as to, too, two; and so, sew, and sow. Homophones and confusingly similar words are the stuff that malapropisms are made of. A malapropism is the unintent...

added by angbeenc
12 days ago

Lend vs. Loan

English has many words that refer to the borrowing of goods and money. Two of the most common words that apply to this context are loan and lend. Do they mean the same thing? Or, are there specific circumstances in which one or the other is more appr...

added by angbeenc
12 days ago

Manner vs. Manor

The words manner and manor are homophones: they sound alike but have different meanings. Consider the sentences below: Nate's grandfather has an odd manner of laughing. The manor is now a popular tourist site. Do you think these sentences are right? ...

added by angbeenc
12 days ago

Allude vs. Elude

He eluded to the problem but did not mention it. The thief alluded the police. Can you spot the mistake in the above two sentences? Take a minute to read both sentences carefully and see if you can find a mistake. If you found it, you are a real geni...

added by angbeenc
19 days ago

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