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Allusion vs. Illusion

It’s not always easy to remember the meanings of English words. English contains many words borrowed or anglicized from a variety of earlier languages, so etymology is not always a clear indicator. Likewise, pronunciation varies from region to regi...

added by angbeenc
1 day ago

Elicit vs. Illicit

Some homophones, similar-sounding words that don’t mean the same thing, are harmless. But elicit and illicit are not among them. They are completely different parts of speech; choosing the wrong one would be an embarrassing mistake. Moreover, it co...

added by angbeenc
1 day ago

Illegal vs. Illicit

As more and more laws are written, they forbid more and more things. Luckily, English has a variety of options for describing something that is against the law. Illegal, illicit, and unlawful are three options that have been in use for centuries. Do ...

added by angbeenc
1 day ago

Hyper vs. Hypo

English has a lot of confusing words that mix up writers from time to time. Many of these words sound the same or are spelled the same or their definitions are so similar that it’s hard to tell them apart.Thankfully, this isn’t the case with the ...

added by angbeenc
1 day ago

Hooves vs. Hoofs

As languages evolve, spellings can change and some words may even develop more than one version. Hoofs and hooves, for instance, are two versions of the same noun. Both versions have been in use for many years, but today, one is much more common than...

added by angbeenc
1 day ago

Honor vs. Honour

It’s no secret that Americans and Britons spell words differently. American English features many streamlined or simplified spellings that some Americans feel more accurately represents the way the language is actually spoken. These spelling differ...

added by angbeenc
1 day ago

Illusion vs. Delusion

Many words in English are confusing. They may appear similar, and they may even have related meanings. In most cases, though, words have clear definitions and should be used carefully. Using the wrong word could confuse your reader, or it could cause...

added by angbeenc
1 day ago

Hands on vs. Hands-on

Short English phrases often begin as separate words, before eventually becoming hyphenated compounds, and finally evolving into closed compounds.Hands on and hands-on are probably in the middle of this process. The eventual progression to a closed co...

added by angbeenc
29 days ago

Hanged vs. Hung

There is a good amount of confusion surrounding the verb hang and its various tenses. Is hanged or hung correct? Are they interchangeable? If not, what is the difference between the two? In this post, I want to go over some basic tenses of the verb h...

added by angbeenc
29 days ago

Harbour vs. Harbor

If you need a place to dock your motorboat, should you look for a harbor or harbour? The answer depends on where your seafaring adventures have taken you. Harbor and harbour are two spelling variants of the same word. One is used in American English,...

added by angbeenc
29 days ago

Hardy vs. Hearty

We all love a good stew. After letting it simmer all day in the crock pot, it becomes a delicious and filling meal that can feed a family for days. But should we call it a hearty meal or a hardy meal? Separately, should you plant hardy plants in your...

added by angbeenc
29 days ago

Heal vs. Heel

Heal and heel are homophones. That means that they are pronounced the same when spoken aloud, but they don’t mean the same thing. Homophones are confusing for many writers, and heal and heel doubly so, since they can both be used as a verb in sente...

added by angbeenc
29 days ago

Homogenous vs. Homogeneous

If you are describing a society that is made up of very similar people, would you describe this society as homogenous or homogeneous? Despite their spelling similarities, these words are not synonyms. One is an outdated term from biology, while the o...

added by angbeenc
29 days ago

Homonyms vs. Homophones vs. Homographs

The words homonym, homophone, and homograph are grammatical terms that are easy to confuse with one another because their meanings are all closely related, so let’s go through each one of them and see what the differences are.Origin:The word homony...

added by angbeenc
29 days ago

Guarantee vs. Guaranty

In the modern world, guarantees are everywhere. We hear about them in commercials and we read them on product packaging. Sometimes it feels like every aspect of our lives is covered by a guarantee from someone or other. But what about a guaranty? Is ...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Gross vs. Net

The first time you looked at a paycheck, you may have seen a large number and been very happy, only to have your excitement dimmed when you cash the check for a much smaller amount. That is because gross pay and net pay refer to two different account...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Grill vs. Grille

Homophones are words that sound alike, but are spelled differently and mean different things. Grill and grille are homophones. It is impossible to discern any difference between them based on their pronunciations alone, but their meanings are actuall...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Great vs. Grate

Some people might be surprised to hear that this is a problem for certain writers, but for English language learners and those who have only heard the word spoken, the confusion makes a little more sense.In this post, I want to compare great vs. grat...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Gist vs. Jist

English has many words that are spelled differently and have different meanings, but which, when spoken, sound similar or even exactly the same. These words are called homophones, and they can make life confusing for someone who isn’t familiar with...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Gaol vs. Jail

As language evolves, some words drop out of common usage or change with the language. This could result in spelling changes, usage changes, or replacement with an entirely new word. This is a frequent occurrence for all modern languages, English incl...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Gage vs. Gauge

English has a lot of confusing words in it. Words that are spelled the same but pronounced differently; words that are spelled differently but pronounced the same; and you can’t forget those words that have such similar meanings it’s difficult to...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Flammable vs. Inflammable

If you are stuck in the wilderness with nothing to help you survive except a box of matches, you will want to know which things you can use to build a fire. Some things burn easily, and some things do not. Flammable and inflammable are adjectives tha...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Flyer vs. Flier

There is a lot of confusion about these two words, partly because there isn’t much consensus on how to use them, but today I want to address that confusion. What’s the difference between flier and flyer? Is it a dialectal difference? Are they use...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Forty vs. Fourty

It’s a common complaint among people who are learning English that the language lacks consistency. English was spoken in both the Old and New Worlds at a time when rapid communication across long distances was impossible, which has led to a differi...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

Forth vs. Fourth

English spelling can be a difficult concept to grasp. There are some words which are spelled differently depending on where they’re used, and some that are spelled in ways that don’t correlate at all with how they’re pronounced when spoken alou...

added by angbeenc
1 month ago

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