Editorial »

Recently Added Articles

Our vibrant community of passionate editors is making sure we're up to date with the latest and greatest grammar tips, articles and tutorials.

Cavalry vs. Calvary

As with so many other similar sounding English words, calvary vs. cavalry often get mixed up in people’s writing. While they aren’t a true set of homophones, they still sound similar enough to confuse people. Each word also contains the same seve...

added by anonymous
3 days ago

Bus vs. Buss

Have you ever wondered about the differences between public transportation and public displays of affection? Chances are good that you haven’t because those two things are not related to each other. The words buses and busses are almost identical, ...

added by anonymous
3 days ago

Canceled vs. Cancelled

There’s no doubt that those of us who live in a snowy area are familiar with these two words. Each and every year, winter snowstorms across the country disrupt travelers’ schedules and school operations by canceling flights and classes—or is it...

added by anonymous
3 days ago

Catalog vs. Catalogue

As you read English, you will notice that some words can be spelled multiple ways. Catalogue, for instance, is sometimes spelled without the -ue, forming catalog instead. This -ue ending derives from Greek suffixing conventions. Since English borrows...

added by anonymous
3 days ago

Caramel vs. Carmel

There are many delicious desserts and drinks that feature the taste of a familiar sweet treat. Most people know what it looks and tastes like, but many writers aren’t sure how this sugary brown ingredient should be spelled. Is the word caramel, pro...

added by anonymous
3 days ago

Calfs vs. Calves

Some English words form plurals easily. Words like rock, tree, and riverbed can be made plural by adding an –s to the end. These words are regular plurals. Other times, pluralization is more complicated. Words wolf, shelf, and calf follow different...

added by anonymous
3 days ago

Comradery vs. Camaraderie

English borrows heavily from other languages, and the Romantic languages are no exceptions. Many English words can be traced to their origins in Italian, Spanish, or French. Camaraderie is one of these words. Like the word comrade, camaraderie comes ...

added by anonymous
3 days ago

Bathe vs. Bath

The differences between American and British English are many and varied. Sometimes, the same word will be spelled differently depending on the region, or words may mean different things entirely. Such is the case with bath and bathe. Both of these w...

added by anonymous
10 days ago

Binging vs. Bingeing

As awareness of eating disorders has increased since the 1980s, so has use of the verb binge. As with many verbs, conjugating binge into various tenses can be challenging. Should the E remain in the progressive tense, to form bingeing, or should it b...

added by anonymous
10 days ago

Brooch vs. Broach

When two words that sound alike mean different things, they are called homophones. English is full of homophones, and some of them can be quite confusing.Brooch and broach sound the same, but they are completely different words. They are not even the...

added by anonymous
10 days ago

Breath vs. Breathe

Both breath and breathe have something to do with air in our lungs, but each word has a different function in the sentence. One refers to the air itself, and the other is the action of inhaling and exhaling.Stopping abruptly, he said, “I need to ca...

added by anonymous
10 days ago

Benefitted vs. Benefited

Many writers are flummoxed at the spelling rules in English. In some cases, the consonant at the end of a word is doubled when adding a suffix, like in the words knit and knitting. Other times, the consonant is left alone, as with the words spite and...

added by anonymous
10 days ago

Brake vs. Break

In English, there are countless words that sound exactly the same when you read them out loud but turn out to have completely different meanings. The grammatical term for words like these is homophone. This means they sound alike but are spelled diff...

added by anonymous
10 days ago

Bellow vs. Below

In English, even minor spelling differences can completely change the meaning of common words. In these cases, a simple typo can completely derail your sentence and turn your writing from polished prose to meaningless drivel. Luckily, you can catch m...

added by anonymous
10 days ago

Bale vs. Bail

English, like all languages, contain homophones, or words that sound alike, but don’t have the same meaning. Two such words, bail and bale, can be potentially disastrous if misused. For example, if you ask someone to bale you out of a situation and...

added by anonymous
17 days ago

Assume vs. Presume

There are a lot of tricky words in English, and it’s hard to keep track of them all. The two words presume vs. assume are no different. Both words have similar meanings, carrying with them the definition “to suppose.”I suppose you are still in ...

added by anonymous
17 days ago

Axe vs. Ax

Sometimes, words are spelled differently in British and American English, even if the words’ meanings don’t change. This can be confusing, but there is usually an easy way to remember.Ax and axe are a good illustration of this principle. The two ...

added by anonymous
17 days ago

Barbeque vs. Barbecue

If you eat meat, you have probably had delicious slow-cooked pork drenched in tangy, spicy sauce. This wonderful invention is called barbecue, and it descends from the traditional food ways of several cultures that found their way to the American Sou...

added by anonymous
17 days ago

Bear vs. Bare

There are actually three different words here, as bear has two different senses. Confusing these two words in your writing can cause you to look sloppy, so it’s important to keep track of what each word means and when it’s appropriate to use each...

added by anonymous
17 days ago

Artefact vs. Artifact

While exploring ancient ruins and forgotten temples, archaeologists and adventures love to stumble upon relics of a long-dead culture. Some of these objects have incredible cultural significance, while others are worth huge sums of money to collector...

added by anonymous
17 days ago

Base vs. Bass

Bass and base are homophones, which means they are pronounced similarly but have different meanings. To further complicate matters, each of these words can mean multiple things and be different parts of speech. Just because two words are confusing do...

added by anonymous
17 days ago

Ageing vs. Aging

Spelling differences between American and British English are enough to give writers fits. The same word is often spelled differently, depending on the background of the writer. There are many different spelling conventions between these two language...

added by angbeenc
24 days ago

Lonely vs. Alone

Have you ever been happy to be by yourself? Has there been another time when you were by yourself, but wishing for the company of others? In both of these situations, you were alone. But you were only lonely in one of them. Alone and lonely are two a...

added by angbeenc
24 days ago

Aluminium vs. Aluminum

English is a complicated language and it may confuse its learners and native speakers alike due to some very similar words or words that have more than one spellings. Aluminium and aluminum are an example of such words and many people confuse themsel...

added by angbeenc
24 days ago

Ambiance vs. Ambience

Let’s say you are trying to choose a restaurant for an anniversary dinner with your spouse. You will want to select a location that has an environment or atmosphere that you will both enjoy. You notice that some online reviews use the word ambiance...

added by angbeenc
24 days ago

We need you!

Help us build the largest grammar knowledge base and articles collection on the web!

Improve your writing now:

Download Grammar eBooks

It’s now more important than ever to develop a powerful writing style. After all, most communication takes place in reports, emails, and instant messages.