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Me vs. I

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A common mistake in people’s writing is to confuse I and me with each other. Both are personal pronouns, but they serve different purposes within the sentence. In many circles, this can be a costly mistake, as it’s usually considered a sign of sloppy writing. In other words, if you are writing a research paper, a press release, a resume, etc., you will want to know how to use I vs. me.

In this post, I will cover everything you need to know about these two words, and once you’re done reading, you won’t have any trouble determining when to use me or I.

Origin:

The word me originated from Old English mē, accusative and dative of I2, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch mij, German mir (dative), from an Indo-European root shared by Latin me, Greek ( e)me, and Sanskrit mā. The word I originated from Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch ik and German ich, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin ego and Greek egō.

Me as pronoun:

Me is used as a pronoun in English language where it is used by a speaker to refer to himself or herself as the object of a verb or preposition.

Do you understand me?

I as pronoun:

I is also used as a pronoun which is used by a speaker to refer to himself or herself.

Accept me for what I am.

Use of me:

Me is used as an objective pronoun. This means that it functions as an object in the sentences. As I is a subject, it is always near the verb or at the beginning of a sentence.

Examples:

I ordered a pizza.

I went to the mall.

Did you see John and me at the party?

Use of I:

I is used as a subjective pronoun. This simply means that it functions as the subject of a sentence. As me functions as an object, thus it appear after verbs or prepositions in a sentence.

Examples:

Ashley went to pool with Molly and me.

She thanked me for the car.

You and I went to the movies.

Me or I:

While these words can be tough to remember, it’s important to use them correctly. I is used as a subject. Me is used as an object. If you’re still not sure when to use me and you and you and me or and me or and I, here is a good trick that will help you remember. When you run across a sentence that confuses you, remove the other person from the sentence and try it out with just I or me. For example,

Tracy and (I/me) like this dress.

I like this dress. (Correct)

Me like this dress. (Incorrect)

Also,

The bus dropped (I/me) and Tracy near the park.

The bus dropped I near the park. (Incorrect)

The bus dropped me near the park. (Correct)

 

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"Me vs. I." Grammar.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 22 Nov. 2017. <http://www.grammar.com/me_vs._i>.

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