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possessive case

The personal pronouns (and the relative or interrogative pronoun who) exhibit case. The case of a pronoun reveals how the noun it replaces would act in the sentence. We have three cases: (1) subjective or nominative case, (2) objective case, and (3) possessive case.

The relative or interrogative pronoun who also exhibits case: who (subjective), whom (objective), and whose (possessive).

The following table reveals the possessive case of personal pronouns. You must use the possessive case when the pronoun replaces a noun that would have a possessive ending. Notice that two forms of possessive pronouns appear. The first is used when the possessive pronoun modifies a noun (my car), the second when the possessive pronoun stands by itself (the car is mine).

Singular Personal Pronouns  
Person Possessive Case
First Person my-mine
Second Person your-yours
Third Person his-his (masculine)
her-hers (feminine)
its-its (neuter)
Plural Personal Pronouns  
Person Possessive Case
First Person our-ours
Second Person your-yours
Third Person their-theirs

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