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Great vs. Grate

Some people might be surprised to hear that this is a problem for certain writers, but for English language learners and those who have only heard the word spoken, the confusion makes a little more sense.In this post, I want to compare great vs. grat...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Gist vs. Jist

English has many words that are spelled differently and have different meanings, but which, when spoken, sound similar or even exactly the same. These words are called homophones, and they can make life confusing for someone who isn’t familiar with...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Gaol vs. Jail

As language evolves, some words drop out of common usage or change with the language. This could result in spelling changes, usage changes, or replacement with an entirely new word. This is a frequent occurrence for all modern languages, English incl...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Gage vs. Gauge

English has a lot of confusing words in it. Words that are spelled the same but pronounced differently; words that are spelled differently but pronounced the same; and you can’t forget those words that have such similar meanings it’s difficult to...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Flammable vs. Inflammable

If you are stuck in the wilderness with nothing to help you survive except a box of matches, you will want to know which things you can use to build a fire. Some things burn easily, and some things do not. Flammable and inflammable are adjectives tha...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Flyer vs. Flier

There is a lot of confusion about these two words, partly because there isn’t much consensus on how to use them, but today I want to address that confusion. What’s the difference between flier and flyer? Is it a dialectal difference? Are they use...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Forty vs. Fourty

It’s a common complaint among people who are learning English that the language lacks consistency. English was spoken in both the Old and New Worlds at a time when rapid communication across long distances was impossible, which has led to a differi...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Forth vs. Fourth

English spelling can be a difficult concept to grasp. There are some words which are spelled differently depending on where they’re used, and some that are spelled in ways that don’t correlate at all with how they’re pronounced when spoken alou...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Foreword vs. Forward

When two words sound alike, but are not spelled the same and do not mean the same things, they are called homophones. There are many of these words in English.It’s easy to confuse two homophones in writing—after all, they are pronounced the same,...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Forego vs. Forgo

There are countless words in the English language that confuse people on a daily basis. Many of these words sound alike, many are spelled alike, and many have definitions that are so similar it’s difficult to tell them apart. Despite sounding ident...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Flush out vs. Flesh out

Here we have two popular phrases that get confused with each other every now and then, mostly among speakers. But, anticipating that this confusion might someday make its way into people’s writing, I want to take the time to write a preemptive post...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Fair vs. Fare

English has a lot of confusing words and among the most confusing of them all are homophones. These are words that sound exactly the same when you say them, but they are spelled differently. There are hundreds of examples of words like this in Englis...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Farther vs. Further

So is there any difference between the words “farther” and “further?” It seems like people use them interchangeably all the time, but is this correct? I get questions about these two words just about every week, and they can be tricky—after...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Favor vs. Favour

Languages can shift over time, even in different parts of the world. Many differences in spelling and usage have grown prominent between British and American English. Favor and favour, for instance, are American and British English spellings of the s...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Phase vs. Faze

Words that sound the same but mean different things are difficult to master when learning a new language. These words are called homophones, and like every language, English has many of them. Faze and phase are two common homophones in English. They ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Fish vs. Fishes

There are many creatures that live in the water. Some taste good, and some do not. Some have scales, and others have hard shells. Fish are one group of these animals. Some English speakers aren’t sure how to refer to more than one fish. Should you ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Flare vs. Flair

As I’m sure you are well aware, English has a lot of confusing words—and flare and flair are no exception. Both native and non-native English speakers alike commonly confuse these two words. They are a classic example of a set of homophones, mean...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Blatant vs. Flagrant

The majority of linguistic issues that writers face on a day-to-day basis really have nothing to do with grammar at all. More often than not they have to do with usage. This happens because there are a lot of English words that sound very similar to ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Extortion vs. Blackmail

Do you know the difference between blackmail and extortion? Unless you are a mafia enforcer, the difference probably isn’t germane to your everyday life, but you might still need to know the difference so that when someone else commits one of these...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Explicit vs. Implicit

There are many words in English that despite having very similar sounds have completely different meanings. This can lead to confusion and usage problems for native and non-native speakers alike, and the words implicit vs. explicit are no exception t...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Access vs. Excess

English can be a confusing language—for native and non-native speakers alike. Many words that have completely different meanings are both spelled and pronounced very similarly. The words access and excess are good examples of just how confusing cer...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Evoke vs. Invoke

While these two words aren’t quite homophones or homonyms, they still sound similar enough to cause some confusion—especially since we don’t use them on a daily basis. So what exactly the difference is between evoke and invoke? In this post, we...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Race vs. Ethnicity

There are few situations where word choice matters more than in discussions of race and ethnicity. Such topics are often politically-charged minefields of taut emotions and flared tempers. Even small mistakes can be distracting and even unintentional...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Ethics vs. Morals

In today’s world, which often seems lawless and relativistic, the difference between ethics and morals might seem like splitting hairs, especially since no one seems concerned with either of them. Nonetheless, you can be the last bastion of upright...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Jealousy vs. Envy

There are many words in English that have very similar definitions–so similar that it’s difficult to tell some of these words apart at times. Jealousy and envy are two such words. Oftentimes, people treat these words as synonyms, but do they have...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

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