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Entitled vs. Titled

There is a lot of information floating around about these two words. Are they both the same? Is one wrong to use? Is one more preferred than the other? There’s no need to worry, however. Once you know the functions of each word, using entitled vs. ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Envision vs. Invision

As languages evolve, spelling conventions change and some words that used to be correct become mistakes. Most writers no longer spell jail as gaol, for instance, even though this spelling used to be predominant. The word envision is the same way. A l...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Endemic vs. Epidemic

If you are a researcher for the World Health Organization, you will need to know how to describe the various diseases and populations that you study. Two words that describe diseases, endemic and epidemic, may seem similar, but they are actually two ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Either vs. Neither

Despite being just a single letter apart from each other, the two words either vs. neither have completely opposite meanings. This underscores just how important it is to use the correct word, since failing to do so could drastically change the meani...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Allude vs. Elude

Another set of words I get asked about frequently is the difference between allude and elude. Even though these two words aren’t a set of homophones, they’re still tough to tell apart. They are relatively similar in their spelling, both sharing t...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

E.g. vs. I.e.

I.e. and e.g. are two different abbreviations that many writers get confused, but, once you understand what each abbreviation means, they aren’t difficult to manage at all.In this post, we will go through the differences between the two, mention a ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Embed vs. Imbed

English is rife with words that are spelled almost the same but mean completely different things. Much less common in English are words that are spelled slightly differently but still have the same meaning. Imbed and embed belong is this second categ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Empathic vs. Empathetic

The English language has evolved over the centuries. It incorporates new words, and phases old words out of common use. Variants that had previously been considered inferior rise to prominence, and come to be accepted. Language shift can be a beautif...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Efficacy vs. Efficiency

The English language has a lot of similar words amongst its ranks. But while many of these words may be similar to one another, they are not the same. They often carry slightly different meanings or they place a different emphasis on the words around...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Effective vs. Affective

There are a lot of English words that have similar meanings to one another, making it difficult to tell them apart. Exactly which word is used for what and when? It’s tough to tell with some words because their meanings are so much alike. Luckily, ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Distrust vs. Mistrust

Sometimes, two words are so similar that even experienced writers have trouble remembering which is which. Distrust and mistrust are two such words. Their meanings are so similar that they are often substituted for one another. Careful writers, thoug...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Drier vs. Dryer

Some words sound alike but don’t mean the same thing. Such words are called homophones, and they are common in English and in other languages as well. Dryer and drier are just two examples of English homophones. There are quite literally hundreds o...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Donut vs. Doughnut

Everyone enjoys a doughnut every now and then—glazed, powdered, sprinkled, jelly filled. It’s hard not to love them. But what’s the correct spelling for this tasty treat? Is it doughnut or donut? The official dictionary spelling of the word is ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Eager vs. Anxious

There are many ways to enrich your writing. One of the easiest ways is by using adjectives. Adjectives describe or modify nouns. You wouldn’t want to use too many adjectives, or you could potentially make your writing ostentatious or ornate. The wo...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Eatable vs. Edible

Say you’re about to sit down and eat a meal with your family; what’s the best way to describe the food sitting on the dining room table? Is it eatable or edible? Chances are, you wouldn’t choose either of these words—unless you want to offend...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Disperse vs. Disburse

Everyday-spoken English is usually considered less formal than written English, and this informality sometimes extends to word pronunciation. Even some words that originally had distinct pronunciations have become homophones, or words that sound alik...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Disorganized vs. Unorganized

Do disorganized and unorganized mean the same thing?After all, how many different words do we need to describe something which is not organized? If you have ever lived or worked with someone who does not put a high value on cleanliness, you know that...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Me vs. I

A common mistake in people’s writing is to confuse I and me with each other. Both are personal pronouns, but they serve different purposes within the sentence. In many circles, this can be a costly mistake, as it’s usually considered a sign of sl...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Discreet vs. Discrete

It’s easy to mix up these two words; discreet and discrete, in English writing. They are a set of homophones, which means both discreet and discrete are pronounced in the same way. This, of course, only adds to the confusion between them, but once ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Dialogue vs. Dialog

If you were a novelist or a playwright, what word would you use to describe a conversation between two or more characters in your work? Are you writing dialogue or dialog between them? Or is there any difference at all?In this post, I want to outline...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Device vs. Devise

It is very easy to make spelling errors. Not even the most experienced writers are immune to these simple, but potentially embarrassing, mistakes. Usually, word processors will identify misspelled words and prompt you to correct them. In some cases, ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Dinner vs. Diner

When words have several related meanings, you have to rely on context to parse the meaning of a sentence. When very similar words have similar meanings, the task becomes much harder. Consider the following sentence:For their annual Christmas dinner, ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Disk vs. Disc

There are a lot of homophones in English that confuse both native and ESL writers alike. The two words disc vs. disk, however, aren’t exactly homophones. They are the same word, but—oddly enough—they are used to refer to different things. And t...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Dependant vs. Dependent

Because American and British English sometimes have different spellings for the same word, beginning writers and English language learners can easily become confused. In some cases, the spelling of a word also changes based on its usage in a sentence...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Denounce vs. Renounce

There are a lot of English words with similar meanings, spelling, pronunciations, etc., and they all serve to confuse writers. Which word is meant to be used and when? Such is the case with renounce vs. denounce. These words share a similar Latin ori...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

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