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Conditional Sentences

If you are paving your path to learn better English or trying to improve your grammar you must have come across the conditional sentences. You might get an idea of what a conditional sentence is by just looking at its name but there is more to it. In...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Adjective vs. Adverb

We all learned about the different parts of speech in high school and most of us can easily distinguish between a noun and a verb. But when it comes to an adjective and an adverb, it is a little hard for us to recall what the real difference between ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Career vs. Carrier

Carrier Carrier is pronounced as “kae-ri-year.” The ‘kae’ sound is same as ‘ca’ sound in cat or the ‘ca’ sound in carrot. It is a noun that can refer to something or someone that carries or conveys object, information or persons. Thin...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Very vs. Too vs. Enough

Too The too with the double o implies more than necessary, desirable or required. For example, ·         There is too much sugar in this tea. (more than I want or need) ·      &...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

I vs. Me

Consider the below example – I did this work. This work was done by me. Both sentences mean the same. The only difference is the voice. First one is active voice (focuses on subject ‘I’), second one is in passive voice (focuses on the work don...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

If I Was vs. If I Were

Was vs WereAs simple as that, in past tense, was is used for singular noun/pronoun and were for plural. For example, I was going to the market and we were going to the market.If I wasThis is a situation that could have happened. That’s because it h...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

So vs. Such

So So is a conjunction. It can join two sentences. ·         I like her, so, I want to date her. ·         I want to watch a movie, so I booked tickets for tonight’s ...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Possessive pronouns vs. Possessive adjectives

Possessive The word possessive itself is an adjective, which means expressing possession or ownership of something. Possessive pronouns Based on the definition above, we use possessive pronouns to tell about something that one owns. For example – ...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Adjectives and Adverbs

Simply put, Adjectives describe nouns. Remember this. Always. What does it mean to say ‘describe’? Let us take an example – “My brother is a good student.” There are different parts of speech in this sentence, the adjective here is ‘goo...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Envoy vs. Convoy

Both convoy and envoy are nouns. Convoy can be used as a verb too, as we will see later in the article.  Envoy Envoy is derived from the old French word ‘en voie’ meaning ‘on the way’. It refers to a person who is a representative of a c...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

The uses of ‘used to’

Used to Used+to – the combination usually lets the speaker tell about a habit. It could be in the past, present or future. When used in the past tense, it generally refers to habits that are now discontinued. For example – ·   &nb...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Tips for Teaching Grammar to ESL Students

10 Great Tips for ESL Students Needless to say, for ESL students it can be difficult to learn all the grammar rules to write correctly. In this short article, we are going to provide you with some hints from famous tutors to improve your grammar sk...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Beside vs. Besides

Beside Beside is a preposition of place. It means ‘next to’. The word has originated from the old English adverb ‘be sidan’ meaning by the side. Examples – ·    My house is beside Tom’s house. ·    We had a...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Raise vs. Rise

Raise Raise needs an object for reference. This means it is a transitive verb. One can raise funds, raise children, raise voice etc... where funds, children and voice are all objects without which raise will not make any sense. Examples – · &...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Employ vs. Deploy

Employ Employ is a verb that comes from the middle English imploy and means to give work to someone and pay for it. For example, a company employs people based on their skills. Some common synonyms of employ are hire, recruit, appoint. Examples – ...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Revenge vs. Avenge

Avenge Avenge is a verb that has its roots from the Latin vindicare. It means to cause harm to someone in return for an injury or wrong doing by them. Avengers is more in the context or sense of giving justice to someone. Examples – ·  &...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Elicit vs Illicit

Elicit Elicit is a verb which means to get or extract something (a fact, answer, reaction, information) from someone. It can be used in both positive and negative sense. The word draws its roots from the mid-17th century Latin word elacere (e+lacere ...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Phrasal verbs with ‘Get’

Get – as a separate word get means to acquire or have something. When combined with several prepositions, the meaning doesn’t remain the same. 1.       Get up – to wake up, or to move away from where you were sitti...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Vocabulary Usage

By reading a wide variety of authors and various types of writing you can build up your vocabulary and acquire the necessary skill in the proper use of words, phrases and idioms. Consciously or subconsciously, while reading, you develop an ear for wh...

added by janetdaetton
1 year ago

How to Stay Motivated to Finish a Book

How to start writing a book? How to stay motivated while writing a book? How to stay motivated to finish something that can turn into a long and complicated process? As with any creative endeavor, when you write a book - whether it is a novel you ar...

added by bailey_b
1 year ago

Cleft sentences and inversion

Inverted sentences – Consider the following example – We have never seen this kind of support before. Here, the subject is ‘We’, ‘have’ is the auxiliary verb. Let us change the order now – Never have we seen this kind of support befor...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

5 Ways to Overcome Grammar Issues

Why Literacy MattersThere are two basic reasons why you should work on your literacy and constantly improve it.1. The Increased Likelihood of Getting Low Marks for Written TasksProfessors do not like illiterate students. They consider them to be inat...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Insist vs. Persist

Insist To insist is to demand something forcefully or urge someone to do something. It can be used in positive as well as negative sense. A few examples – ●    Our CEO insisted that the company was doing well in-spite of the s...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

The ^caret symbol

Origin of the caret symbol Caret is a Latin word which means ‘to be separated’. It is also called as circumflex. Here are a few places where caret symbol is used – 1. Computer programming languages and regular expressions Many programming langu...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Subjunctive mood

What is mood? – a mood is a form a verb takes to show how it (the verb) should be regarded. For example, command, wish, request etc… Subjunctive moods tell about a wish or suggestion. Subjunctive sentences are not true and are based on certain as...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

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