Editorial »

Recently Added Articles

Our vibrant community of passionate editors is making sure we're up to date with the latest and greatest grammar tips, articles and tutorials.

Font size:

Most Common British/American English Spelling Mistakes

While both countries speak the same language, no one can deny that there are quite a few differences in the way that some words are spelled. In many cases, people often confuse the spelling of many words and they can’t tell which is correct and end...

added by Ashley_Wheeler
2 years ago

On Board vs. Onboard

Have you ever wondered if you are on board or onboard a train or a plane? What about the time you agreed to help your friend carry out a crazy plan? Are you on board with his crazy idea or onboard? The answer is same for both questions as even though...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Oneself vs. One’s Self

Oneself vs. One's self Some English words can be very tricky, because they sound and are spelled almost identically. You can often meet this problem with "oneself" and "one's self", for example, even though they should be used in completely diff...

added by malza
2 years ago

On Accident vs. By Accident

By accident…The traditionally correct phrase (adverb) is to use ‘by accident’. It means by mistake or something that’s done without the intention of doing it. For example, “she spilled the milk by accident.” We can also use the word ‘ac...

added by ramyashankar
2 years ago

Online vs. On-Line

Some words evolve – or change – as time goes on. So what should you do when you have to choose between two words, meaning the same thing, written similarly, but different because they are coming from two different times? Is it the older version t...

added by malza
2 years ago

Onto vs. On to

Content about Onto vs. On to has been temporarily removed......

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Translucent vs. Opaque

If you can see through something, is it opaque, translucent, or transparent? Two of these words might fit, depending on how clearly you can see through the object, but the other word is definitely not accurate. All three of these adjectives describe ...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Older vs. Elder

Sometime back, we wrote an article about oldest vs eldest. On similar lines, today let us explore the comparative version – older vs elder.Usually to talk about 2 or more things, we use old or older – say the pot is older than you think it is –...

added by ramyashankar
2 years ago

Common Dissertation Writing Mistakes to Avoid

Your dissertation sure is important! It can make or break your time at university. The thing is, as you’ve never written anything this long before, writing a text like this can be quite overwhelming and there are a lot of opportunities for new mist...

added by Ashley_Wheeler
2 years ago

Offense vs. Offence

Is there any notable difference between “offense” and “offence”? Some might think that it’s the same situation as “advise” and “advice”, that one is the verb and the other is the noun. Others already know for sure that there is no v...

added by malza
2 years ago

Octopi vs. Octopuses

How simple is it to identify the correct form of the plural of a word, in a rich vocabulary where there are plenty of rules regarding word formation, plural formation etc.? To get more specific, when referring to more than one "octopus", which is the...

added by malza
2 years ago

Obtain vs. Attain

With “obtain” and “attain”, confusions or doubts are not about their spellings. It’s quite easy to distinguish these verbs, as they are distinct from every point of view. Still, the pair of words is a great example of common confusion and m...

added by malza
2 years ago

Oftentimes vs. Often Times

Frequently occurring events can also be described as happening often. Can it also be said they are happening oftentimes? While both the words are adverbs, only often can be written before and after a verb. That makes often the modern, smaller, useful...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Obligated vs. Obliged

Obliged" is an old word in the English vocabulary, originating from the verb "to oblige", used to express the past tense or past participle of the initial action of forcing somebody to do something. "Obligated", on the other hand, is built as a regul...

added by malza
2 years ago

Subjective vs. Objective

Statements that are facts based on evidence and opinions taken from valued judgments need to be differentiated in today’s extremely practical life. To differentiate such statements two terms; subjective and objective are used. In this article, I wi...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Non-Profit vs. Not For Profit

At a first sight, "non-profit" and "not for profit" seem to mean the same. But these terms are used most commonly in economic contexts, where accuracy is essential. So if you have to choose the right spelling to include into your writing, especially ...

added by malza
2 years ago

Ninety vs. Ninty

Content about Ninety vs. Ninty has been temporarily removed......

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Not Surprising vs. Not Surprisingly

Not surprising vs. Not surprisinglyWhen you want to use the opposite meaning of a word, adding "not" before that word is a usual preference to express your message. When you refer to something that does not surprise you, therefore, adding "not" befor...

added by malza
2 years ago

No Later Than vs. No Later Then

Content about No Later Than vs. No Later Then has been temporarily removed......

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Fiction vs. Non Fiction

When looking for books to read, or even in daily conversation, we often read or hear about “fiction” and “non fiction”. A “fiction book”, a “non fiction story”, a fact that is “fiction”… While these concepts are frequently menti...

added by malza
2 years ago

No One vs. Nobody

In today’s world, with a rise in feminism, the application of basic masculine pronouns makes it difficult for writers to write without receiving criticism. That leads to the writers switching to the use of nobody and no one in their writings. In th...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

No One vs. Noone

Have you ever wondered why some pairs of words are shortened into a single word, but not other pairs? To make matters even more confusing, sometimes the pairs are used differently than in their shortened form (for example, log in and login). It can b...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Nerve Wracking vs. Nerve Racking

With today’s hectic schedules, everyone in their life experience at least one stressful situation every day. Anything which causes a feeling of stress or anxiety to an individual is referred to nerve-racking. However, there is another similar word ...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Never mind vs. Nevermind

Content about Never mind vs. Nevermind has been temporarily removed......

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

New vs. Knew

If two or more words sound the same when spoken out loud, but have different meanings, they are called homophones. Be careful not to confuse homophones with homographs, which also have different meanings but, instead, share a common spelling. Knew an...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

We need you!

Help us build the largest grammar knowledge base and articles collection on the web!

Improve your writing now:

Download Grammar eBooks

It’s now more important than ever to develop a powerful writing style. After all, most communication takes place in reports, emails, and instant messages.