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Counsellor vs. Counselor

Spelling differences in American and British English are widespread and well-documented. From consonant doubling to -ise and ize suffixes, American writers and British writers are likely to spell many common words differently, even when these writers...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Deceased vs. Diseased

English has a lot of confusing words in it. Some words are spelled the same with different meanings, some words are spelled differently but pronounced the same, and some words are spelled differently and pronounced differently, but they look and soun...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Criteria vs. Criterion

There is a bit of confusion that surrounds the use of criteria vs. criterion. What is the difference between them? Is there one? Is one singular and one plural? In this post, I want to answer these questions and compare both words: criteria vs. crite...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Dairy vs. Diary

Dairy and diary are confusing because they are spelled with the same letters, but with the two vowels reversed. Using one of these words in place of the other is as easy as making a simple typo. Unfortunately, these words do not mean the same things ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Cue vs. Queue

Cue and queue sound the same when spoken aloud, but they do not mean the same thing. This difference in meaning despite identical pronunciations makes them homophones. If you are writing about a game of billiards, you can avoid ridicule by using the ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Currant vs. Current

Languages have so many words that some of them are bound to be similar. In English, words that sound alike but do not mean the same thing are called homophones. Homophones can be confusing, and in their misuse, hilarity sometimes ensues. If you write...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Counsel vs. Council

There are many words that sound the same or nearly the same, but have different meanings. In English, these words are called homophones. Counsel and council are two often misused near homophones. To make matters worse, their contexts are often relate...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Certainly vs. Definitely

English is quite a confusing language when it comes to certain words which have very similar meanings and makes it hard for the speakers and writers to determine when to use which word. Among the list of these words, certainly and defi...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Coarse vs. Course

English contains many homophones, that is to say, many words which sound alike when spoken, but retain different meanings. Course and coarse are two such words. Not only do they mean different things, but they are also different parts of speech. One ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Coma vs. Comma

Have you ever been confused by two words which are spelled nearly the same, but have different meanings? Coma and comma are two such words. Their meanings do not overlap, even though there is only one letter’s difference in their spellings. One of ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Continual vs. Continuous

The English language is full of words that are both similar in sound and similar in meaning. Many of these words are classified as homophones, but many others don’t quite fit under that label. The two words continually vs. continuously, while not b...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Collaborate vs. Corroborate

When you work together with people toward a shared goal, are you corroborating with them, or collaborating with them? Likewise, what are you doing when you confirm someone else’s telling of events with your own account of what happened? If you cann...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Convince vs. Persuade

English is full of confusing words. If you’re not dealing with a confusing set of homophones or homonyms, you’re trying to understand the difference between two words with incredibly similar meanings, like convince vs. persuade. While many writer...

added by edgood
1 year ago

Cloth vs. Clothes

Sometimes, the materials used to make a product have similar names to the end product itself. This is the case with cloth and clothes. Clothes are made of cloth, but do either of these words have additional meanings? Continue reading to find out.In t...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Choir vs. Chorus

Several types of groups can perform music, from solo electronic DJs, to pipe bands, to philharmonic orchestras, to choirs. But what’s the difference between a choir and a chorus? Don’t both of these words describe a large group of singers? Yes, b...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Check vs. Cheque

One of the unintended consequences of the fiercely independent American ideology is that sometimes Americans and their British compatriots decide to spell things differently. These divergent spellings may not be as common as they once were, but they ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Chronic vs. Acute

As we age, our bodies start to wear out, and we start to have a variety of medical problems. These problems usually involve pain of some kind. When we talk to our doctors, we use many different terms to help us describe the nature of our problems, in...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Check-in vs. Check in

Some words can be used as multiple parts of speech. Check, for instance, has several senses as both a noun and a verb. It can also be used in the phrase check in. Check-in, a variant, adds to the versatility of this word. Continue reading to learn mo...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Center vs. Centre

Spelling differences between American and British English have confused writers for centuries. Center and centre exemplify this confusion. Like many similar words, centre is the older term; it later became Americanized as center during a period of ra...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Chord vs. Cord

English homophones are some of the most difficult words to differentiate from one another. Even if you use a word on a regular basis in speech, you might not know how to spell it with the meaning you are thinking. That’s what makes homophones trick...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Cavalry vs. Calvary

As with so many other similar sounding English words, calvary vs. cavalry often get mixed up in people’s writing. While they aren’t a true set of homophones, they still sound similar enough to confuse people. Each word also contains the same seve...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Bus vs. Buss

Have you ever wondered about the differences between public transportation and public displays of affection? Chances are good that you haven’t because those two things are not related to each other. The words buses and busses are almost identical, ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Canceled vs. Cancelled

There’s no doubt that those of us who live in a snowy area are familiar with these two words. Each and every year, winter snowstorms across the country disrupt travelers’ schedules and school operations by canceling flights and classes—or is it...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Catalog vs. Catalogue

As you read English, you will notice that some words can be spelled multiple ways. Catalogue, for instance, is sometimes spelled without the -ue, forming catalog instead. This -ue ending derives from Greek suffixing conventions. Since English borrows...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Caramel vs. Carmel

There are many delicious desserts and drinks that feature the taste of a familiar sweet treat. Most people know what it looks and tastes like, but many writers aren’t sure how this sugary brown ingredient should be spelled. Is the word caramel, pro...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

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