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Lie vs. Lye

Irregular verbs are a headache for even the most experienced writers. Take lie for example. As a present participle, the word is conjugated to lying. Given this irregular spelling, it makes sense that some writers would be tempted to include the Y in...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Libel vs. Slander

Both of these words can have legal consequences and fit broadly under the umbrella of defamation, but what do they actually mean?In this post, I want to compare slander vs. libel. I will go over their definitions, their legal uses, and give you a tri...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Coursework Writing Mistakes and Tips to Avoid them

This article has the goal to show students the most widespread mistakes they often make while writing their coursework. These mistakes are main reasons why you can get bad grades for this scientific work, and fail your academic career as we...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Longitude vs. Latitude

If you look at a globe or a map of the Earth, you might see horizontal and vertical lines that intersect each other and form a grid-like pattern. Some of them may have numbers printed near them. These are called latitude and longitude lines. Their tr...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Former vs. Latter

If you’re in school or reading any type of academic prose, you have mostly likely seen these two words in some of your assigned readings. They usually appear as a pair but not always, and many readers find them confusing. Once you know how to use t...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Attorney vs. Lawyer

If you are sued for gross negligence by someone who was injured as a result of your careless actions, who will represent you in court? You could represent yourself, but that might be a risky idea. Civil litigation is not a realm where amateurs genera...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Layout vs. Lay out

Graphic designers lay out layouts in clever ways to make information visually appealing and easy to read. Or do they layout lay outs? The choice between compounds and their individual words has plagued writers for centuries. Even most word processors...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Lead vs. Led

The English language has hundreds of different words that trip up writers on a regular basis. Many of these confusing English words are homophones, words that are pronounced alike but have different meanings and spellings. Another good portion is ver...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Leaned vs. Leant

As languages evolve, some words fall out of style. They are usually replaced, sometimes by a different version of the same word, or sometimes by a new word altogether. This is how languages change to fit the needs of the people who use them. Leant an...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Leaped vs. Leapt

There are many words in English that have more than one spelling. Leaped and leapt are two such words. They are both past tense conjugations of the same verb, but one is preferred in American English, while the other is preferred in British English.C...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Lath vs. Lathe

As with any modern language, English has many words that are differentiated by only a single character. Writers need to be careful to use these words correctly, since even an innocent typo can completely change the meaning of the sentence. Two such w...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Latter vs. Ladder

Homophones are words that have similar pronunciations but different meanings. Ladder and latter are two homophones that give many writers trouble. In reality, these two words are never interchangeable, since they are actually different parts of speec...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Labor vs. Labour

When some Americans pursued a distinctly American form of English, one of the changes they decided to make was to simplify the spelling of certain words to more closely represent the ways they are likely to be pronounced by American speakers. Whether...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Labelled vs. Labeled

American and British English have many pesky spelling differences, often between two versions of the same word. These differences can be maddening for beginning writers and for learners of English. When you mark something with its name or purpose, ar...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Knit vs. Knitted

English verbs follow several patterns of conjugation. Many verbs are irregular, and some of those don’t follow the same rules as other verbs at all. Other verbs, though, are regular, and are conjugated according to predictable rules and conventions...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Night vs. Knight

Another day and another set of confusing words. Like so many words in English, knight and night have identical pronunciations, but they have incredibly different meanings. In fact, their definitions are in no way related at all.Today, I want to brief...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Knew vs. New

If two or more words sound the same when spoken out loud, but have different meanings, they are called homophones. Be careful not to confuse homophones with homographs, which also have different meanings but, instead, share a common spelling.Knew and...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

4 Hard Issues in the English Language for Non-Native Speakers

Did you know that the letter “e” is the most frequently used symbol in English? Orthat the majority of the English words start with the letter “s”? And oh, here is agood one: the most commonly used words in English are “you” and “I”.I...

added by acronimous
2 years ago

Dive Deeper into the English Language with These Tips

Admit it – when someone tells you that he/she’s learning English, and it’s verydifficult, chances are that you don’t help or comfort them by giving some tips,sharing your personal hacks or doing anything that can make the studying processfor ...

added by acronimous
2 years ago

Expresso vs. Espresso

Coffee lovers have a special relationship with a certain type of concentrated, highly caffeinated coffee called espresso. Some English speakers pronounce the word with an X, like expresso. In coffee shops, more than in most businesses, keeping up app...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Eulogy vs. Elegy

The English language is full of confusing words that mix up writers and speakers alike, and most of this confusion surrounds English homophones. If two words have the same pronunciation but different meanings, they are called homophones. A classic se...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Inter vs. Intra

Did you play any sports in college? Well, if you didn’t play on the school’s football or basketball team, you might have played intramural sports—or is it intermural? These two English prefixes are tricky because they sound pretty close to each...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Valuable vs. Invaluable

Some English usage can look mystifying to outside observers. Often, though, even things which don’t seem to make sense on a superficial level actually do make sense after all. Invaluable and valuable, for example, seem to be opposites, but most Eng...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Jewelry vs. Jewellery

If your spouse has a birthday coming up, should you buy jewelry or jewellery? Choosing a birthday gift for a loved one can be a stressful shopping experience, but, luckily, knowing the difference between these two words do not have to be so nerve-rac...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Judgement vs. Judgment

The words judgment and judgement can cause a bit of confusion and unease in people’s writing because not many of writers are sure when to use which one. Are they just variants of the same word? Do they have different meanings or different functions...

added by angbeenc
2 years ago

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