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Fair vs. Fare

Reasonable and just, as in fair treatment.Fair hair is light yellow.Neither good nor bad. Greg is just a fair student.Weather is clear and sunny.An outdoor show of farm products and animals, often with entertainment, amusements, and rides.By the rule...

added by annie_l
1 month ago

For vs. Four

Intended to be used on or with. These markers are for posters.Meeting the needs of. I take citamins for my health.Over the time or distance of. We marched for miles.Due to. She has to travel for her job.In honor of, or on behalf of. He picked the flo...

added by annie_l
1 month ago

Beat vs. Beet

To hit someone or something many times.To defeat someone in a game or contest. Steve beat me at chess.The regular rhythm of a piece of music or of your heart.In cooking, if you beat a mixture, you stir it up quickly with a machine, spoon, or fork.A r...

added by annie_l
1 month ago

Sew vs. So

To make, repair, or fasten something with stitches made by a needle and thread.In this or that way. If you want to throw a sinking pitch, hold the baseball so.To that extent. I’m so hungry I could eat a horse.Very. The puppy is so cute.Very much. I...

added by annie_l
1 month ago

Wait vs. Weight

To stay in a place or do nothing for a period of time until someone comes or something happens. We waited an hour for the train.To look forward to something. Nilda waited all week for her best friend to return feom vacation.To be delayed or put off. ...

added by annie_l
1 month ago

Waist vs. Waste

The middle part of your body between your ribs and your hips.The part of a garment that covers the body around the waist area.If you waste something, you use or spend it foolishly or carelessly. Don’t waste your time.If someone wastes away, the per...

added by annie_l
1 month ago

Sundae vs. Sunday

Ice cream served with one or more toppings, such as syrup, whipped cream, nuts, or fruit.The first day of the week, after Saturday and before Monday....

added by annie_l
1 month ago

Son vs. Sun

Someone’s son is his or her male child.The star that the earth and other planets revolve around and that gives us light and warmth. Sometimes written Sun.Any star that is the center of a system of planets.Light and warmth from the sun. Don’t stay...

added by annie_l
1 month ago

Know vs. No

To be familiar with a person, place, or piece of information.Not so; a negative response to a question.Not at all. The newborn kitten was no larger than a child’s hand.A word used to show surprise, wonder, or, disbelief. No! That can’t be true!No...

added by annie_l
1 month ago

pro-drop

The property of a language in which a sentence does not require an overt subject. Spanish is a pro-drop language: it is perfectly normal in Spanish to say No canto bien (Don't sing well) rather than Yo no canto bien (I don't sing well). English is no...

added by Robert_Haigh
2 months ago

clipping

Clipping is a type of word-formation in which a short piece is extracted from a longer word and given the same meaning. Examples include bra from brassiere, gym from gymnasium, flu from influenza, cello from violoncello, phone from telephone and bus ...

added by Robert_Haigh
2 months ago

Likeable vs. likable

Both spellings are acceptable in both British and American English, but British English strongly prefers likeable, while American English slightly prefers likable....

added by Robert_Haigh
2 months ago

Copyright vs Copywrite

Copyright Copyright is a noun, which means exclusive legal rights of something – a work of art, music, document, poem, film name or any original work. This object or piece of work cannot be copied or used without permission from the owner or paymen...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

dissent vs. dissension

These words are not equivalent. Dissent is disagreement with an opinion, especially with a majority view. Dissension is serious and persistent disagreement among a group of people, especially ill-natured disagreement which leads to quarrels. ...

added by Robert_Haigh
2 months ago

dissatisfied vs. unsatisfied

When you are dissatisfied you are disappointed, unhappy or frustrated. When you are unsatisfied, you feel that you need more of something. Only a person can be dissatisfied, while an abstract thing like hunger or a demand for goods can be unsatisfied...

added by Robert_Haigh
2 months ago

waste vs. wastage

The word wastage is not a fancy equivalent for waste. Waste is failure to use something which could easily be used. But wastage is loss resulting from unavoidable natural causes, such as evaporation....

added by Robert_Haigh
2 months ago

obsolescent vs. obsolete

Something which is obsolescent is dropping out of use but is not yet entirely gone, while something which is obsolete has completely disappeared from use....

added by Robert_Haigh
2 months ago

childish vs. childlike

Though childish is occasionally used neutrally to mean 'appropriate to a child', as in my childish efforts at drawing, it is much more commonly encountered as a term of contempt applied to an adult, as in the familiar  Don't be so childish! ...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

ketchup, catchup, catsup

In British English, ketchup is the only form in use. American English still uses all three forms, though ketchup is the recommended form for American writers....

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

learnèd word

A word taken from a classical language. For example, instead of breakable, English often uses the Latin word fragile; instead of dog we sometimes use the Latin word canine; instead of saying that a disease is catching, we often prefer the L...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

diachronic

Pertaining to the time element in language; involving change in a language over time. A diachronic approach to the study of a language is the study of its development over a period of time....

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

tag question

A brief question which is tacked on to the end of a statement. English uses two different kinds of tag question, both of somewhat complex formation. Consider the statement Astrid is Norwegian. One kind of tag question extends this statement so as to ...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

minor sentence

Any piece of speech or writing which does not have the form of a complete sentence but which is normal in context. Examples: "Any news?"; "No smoking!"; "Hello."; "As if I would know."; "Wow!...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

double negative

Any construction in which two or more negative words occur in a single clause. Examples 1: "I didn't see nothing" (= I didn't see anything); Examples 2: "No football team can't win no championship without no defenders" (= No football team can win a c...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

COVID-19 Capitalization

The word "coronavirus" is not a proper noun, and is not the name of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. Therefore, "CoronaVirus", "Coronavirus", and "Corona Virus" are invalid. Adding a space, like in "corona virus", is also invalid.You can't say someon...

added by ryan_1
3 months ago

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