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Naught vs. Nought

Many of the languages in use today have been around for millennia. English has gone through many changes during that time, and while most of the language has evolved, a few words have survived to the 21st century almost intact. Naught and nought are ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Moustache vs. Mustache

Human men have hair on their faces. Some men style their facial hair in fashionable ways. Other men grow their hair into long, unruly tangles, which is also sometimes fashionable. Fortunately, just as there are several styles of facial hair, there ar...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Ethics vs. Morals

In today’s world, which often seems lawless and relativistic, the difference between ethics and morals might seem like splitting hairs, especially since no one seems concerned with either of them. Nonetheless, you can be the last bastion of upright...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Moral vs. Morale

If two words are spelled similarly, it can be tricky to remember which is which. That is the case with moral and morale. Both of these words can function as a noun in a sentence, but only one of them can function as an an adjective as well. Continue ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Moot vs. Mute

Language can be confusing at times, especially with words that sound similar to one another. Such is the case with mute and moot. Although they do have different pronunciations, they sound pretty close to each other when you say them out loud, and na...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Movable or Moveable

Ernest Hemingway’s memoir, which consists of portraits of famous literary expatriates and sketches of the author’s life as a young man in Paris, is a fascinating read for anyone interested in Hemingway or the American literary golden age of the 1...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Mucus vs. Mucous

The human body produces many fluids. Some of these fluids are mundane and some inspire disgust, but they are all necessary for the body’s daily operation and maintenance. One such fluid is found in many membranes in various places throughout the bo...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Monologue vs. Soliloquy

Theater geeks are an insular bunch, obsessed with the minutiae of stagecraft and drama. Even some of these sages of the stage cannot remember the difference between a monologue and a soliloquy, though. If you are an actor, as long as you can remember...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Modelling vs. Modeling

If you are an attractive human, you might be able to convince people to pay you to be photographed wearing expensive clothing and jewelry. If you are less attractive, you might need to resort to a career designing and maintaining complex simulation s...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Maybe vs. May be

A compound word is two or more words combined to form a new word. There are many compound words in English, like windmill, strawberry, granddaughter, and maybe. Maybe also has a near homophone in the phrase may be. Since, in this case, the words are ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Me vs. I

A common mistake in people’s writing is to confuse I and me with each other. Both are personal pronouns, but they serve different purposes within the sentence. In many circles, this can be a costly mistake, as it’s usually considered a sign of sl...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Monies vs. Moneys

If you have ever read a company’s financial filings, you are likely to discover a high volume of opaque jargon. Sometimes, these documents are designed to obscure the financial state of a company, rather than to clarify it. One word, however, is ea...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Mischievious vs. Mischievous

Some people are always causing trouble. Sometimes, the person might just be accident-prone. We might call such a person clumsy or hapless. Other people, though, seem to relish trouble, and seek it out at every turn. Rather than hapless and clumsy, we...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Mold vs. Mould

Americans and the British spell many words differently. Americans omit the U that appears in some British words as a second vowel directly before a consonant. This rule doesn’t extend to every such word, though, so it can be confusing to remember w...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Mistrust vs. Distrust

Sometimes, two words are so similar that even experienced writers have trouble remembering which is which. Distrust and mistrust are two such words. Their meanings are so similar that they are often substituted for one another. Careful writers, thoug...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Grammar Mistakes Leading to Plagiarism Issues in English Writing

When learning English, you have to deal with essays, reviews, research, and other types of papers. Assigning them, your tutors won't estimate mere grammar and vocabulary but also check if you didn't copy those papers from others. Plagiarism is a core...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

May vs. Might

The two words may and might cause a lot of confusion in English and many writers aren’t sure when to use which one. A lot of people use them interchangeably, especially in speech, but is there really no difference between the two? Today I want to c...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Can vs. May

These two words cause a lot of confusion in English and leave writers—and speakers especially—unsure about which word to use and when. Does can have a special function that may cannot be used for? Or are they completely interchangeable?Origin:The...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Math vs. Maths

By any name, writers as a group have encountered no enemy quite so intractable as the enemy of mathematics. Writers don’t understand numbers. We don’t trust them. Nonetheless, mathematics is part of life, and we must learn to accept the things we...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Material vs. Materiel

English, like any written language, has countless words that changing even one letter will spell an entirely different word. No writer is immune from these mistakes, and their presence has the potential to alter the meaning of your sentence to someth...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Master vs. Mister

The words master and mister are confusing. They are spelled with only one letter’s difference, but they do not reference the same meanings. To make things even more complicated, master has more than one meaning, and one has dropped out of modern us...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Many vs. Much

Quantities and volumes can be confusing in English. Some nouns can be counted as individual items, while others cannot. There is a large amount of shade during the late evening, and there are several shades of orange and gold in the sky during these ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Mantel vs. Mantle

If humans tried hard enough, we could probably devise a language rich enough so that every word had a single meaning, separate from all other words, and they would all be pronounced distinctly from one another to avoid confusion. Unfortunately, whoev...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Frequently Asked Questions

A lot or Alot? A or An? Accept or Except? Acronyms and Initialisms? Active or Passive Verbs? Affect or Effect? All Ready or Already? Allusion or Illusion? Among or Amongst? Among or Between? Amount or Number? And or But to begin a sentence? Annota...

added by anonymous
1 year ago

Why The English Language Is So Hard To Learn

The bandage was wound around the wound.The farm was used to produce produce.The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.We must polish the Polish furniture.He could lead if he would get the lead out.The soldier decided to desert his desser...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

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