Log In vs. Login



  malza  —  Grammar Tips
Having access to all types of platforms today on the internet, you have probably seen the words "login" and "log in" so many times before typing your username and password that you can't even count which version you have seen more often. But it can be confusing that you sometimes read it as one word, ("login"), while other times it appears as two words ("log in").

So which one is the correct form and how should you spell this word when you write it yourself?

Log in vs. Login

"Log in" written as two words is a verb, created with the verb "to log", followed by the preposition "in". "Logging" refers to writing a record of events such as an aircraft or ship. Followed by the preposition "in", its meaning changes. Therefore, "log in" is the verb referring to connecting to a system of computers by typing the username and the password.

"Login", on the other hand, written as one word, is a noun or an adjective, referring directly to the data (username and password) that are introduced in order to connect a computer to another system.

When do we use "log in"?

You can use "log in" only as a verb, referring to the action of introducing the data that allows you to connect to a specific system.

Example: Please log in to gain access to our information. - "log in" is a verb referring to connecting to a database by introducing username and password.

When do we use "login"?

"Login" can be used both as a noun and as an adjective, with the meaning of the data that allows the connection to a system.

Example 1: Please introduce your login details to connect to your account. - "login" is an adjective referring to the details regarding a connection.

Example 2: Login on our platform is only possible with an email account or a phone number. - "login" is a noun here, referring to the connection to a platform.

Conclusion

The essential is to remember that "log in" is a verb and "login" is a noun or an adjective. This is important to know in order to use them correctly in your sentences. But anyway, they refer to the same concept.

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