Offer vs. Offering



  Soulwriter  —  Grammar Tips

If "offer" and "offering" are confusing and causing you to question their accuracy in several phrases, then this article will certainly help you clarify some essential aspects about these words. Check the explanations below and remove any doubt regarding "offer vs. offering".

Offer vs. Offering

The truth is, both "offer" and "offering" can be used both as verbs and as nouns. And the reason for that is the fact that "offering" is actually the present-participle form of the verb "to offer" and, like most of the verbs in participle form, it can also become a noun and function accordingly in any phrase - just like in the case of "writing", "painting" or "drawing".

When do we use "offer"?

Let's start with the first and more complex word: "offer". As a verb, it describes the action of giving someone an opportunity, of asking someone if they would like something. It can also refer to saying you want to do something for another person, to say that you are willing to give or provide a certain amount of money, service or item.

Now let's get to "offer" as a noun. The word is used to define something to be given over - a product, act or service that can be provided to someone. Furthermore, it can also refer to a certain amount of money that one is willing to pay for something, a special arrangement or a deal for something one is willing to buy or exchange.

Example 1: Someone should offer that old lady a seat. - as a verb, "offer" means asking someone if they would like something.

Example 2: I will offer to drive her home, but I cannot help her in any other way. - "offer" can also refer to saying that you want to do something for another person.

Example 3: I can offer you $500 for your work. - "offer" can also be used as a verb referring to agreeing to pay a certain amount of money.

Example 4: Please let me offer you my advice. - the verb "to offer" can also mean to give something to someone else.

Example 5: I am thinking about accepting the job offer they gave me. - as a noun, "offer" defines the act of asking someone if they would like something; an opportunity for them to accept or deny.

Example 6: Can you make me a better offer for this product? I would love to get the best offer! - "offer" can also be used as a noun when referring to a price that is cheaper than usual, or a certain amount of money that someone is willing to pay for something.

When do we use "offering"?

First of all, "offering" is the present participle form of the verb "offering" and therefore, can be used as a verb with the exact same meaning as the verb that it originates from. But besides that, "offering" can also function as a noun, defining something that is given to someone else.

Example 1: He wasn't offering me a job, but the chance for a new life. - "offering" can be used as the present participle form of the verb "to offer", with the same definitions as the original verb.

Example 2: I want to make a peace offering, hoping to calm the tension for a while. - "offering" as a noun defines something given to someone else.

Conclusion

As common as it is, "offer" is also a complex English word, due to the relatively high number of meanings that it carries and contexts where it can be used. But keep in mind that it can function both as a noun and as a verb, whereas "offering", derived from "offer", is the present participle form that can also be used as a noun.

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