Editorial »

Most Popular Articles Page #3

Here are our most popular grammar articles — enjoy your reading!

Past Participle - The -ed Verb

Every verb also has a past-participial form, which, for most verbs, you create by adding ‑ed, ‑d, or ‑t. As with present participles, you’ll sometimes have to double up an ending consonant: The past participle of occur is occurred. Check ...

 53,892 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

nominal clause

A nominal clause is a group of words with a conjugated verb in it that acts as a noun. Also called a noun clause, this structure can fulfill virtually all functions of a noun. A nominal clause starts with words like that, the fact ...

 53,643 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

progressive tense

The progressive tense (also called the progressive aspect) is sometimes referred to as the imperfect tense.There are six progressive tenses: present, past, fut...

 53,535 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

Make Do vs. Make Due

When things don’t go the way we want them to, what do you do in such situations? You make do the best out of it. In medieval English language, the phrase make do had a substitute and that was the phrase of make due. However, in today’s current la...

 52,377 Views
added by angbeenc
3 years ago

Table of Personal Pronouns

You might want to bookmark this page.Now let’s put it all together. The first table below shows singular personal pronouns; the second, plural personal pronouns. ...

 51,773 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

enclosed please find, please find enclosed, enclosed herewith

Boot out all these expressions from your language. In the words of Bryan Garner, they are “archaic deadwood.” Garner, Oxford, p. 124.Instead, try these on for size: Here are the reports you wanted. I enclose the reports you wanted. Enclosed are t...

 50,941 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

Commas and Coordinate Adjectives

Long, Hot SummerWhen each of two adjectives modifies the same noun, put a comma between them. As a test, put the word and between the two adjectives. If it fits, then the adjectives are called coordinate adjectives: It is going to be a ...

 50,939 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

Catalog vs. Catalogue

English is a language used in various countries and those countries have made modifications to the language according to their own requirements. Those modifications include changing spellings of numerous words including the pair we will be discussing...

 49,835 Views
added by angbeenc
4 years ago

Oftentimes vs. Often Times

Frequently occurring events can also be described as happening often. Can it also be said they are happening oftentimes? While both the words are adverbs, only often can be written before and after a verb. That makes often the modern, smaller, useful...

 49,779 Views
added by angbeenc
3 years ago

“Fewer” vs. “Less”

Nine Items or FewerA couple of adjectives cause many writers a lot of trouble: less vs. fewer. Let’s straighten out the problems. Write with fewer lesses. Many writers confuse fewer and less...

 49,725 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

Oneself vs. One’s Self

Oneself vs. One's self Some English words can be very tricky, because they sound and are spelled almost identically. You can often meet this problem with "o...

 49,525 Views
added by malza
3 years ago

Lie vs. Lye

Words like lie are considered an irregular verb in the English language. Being a present principle ‘lie’, it refers to being untruthful. However, writing the same word with the alphabet ‘y’ makes it entirely different, giving off a different ...

 49,344 Views
added by angbeenc
4 years ago

“Whose” and “Of Which”

When a possessive form is called for by the sentence, the word that has to bow out and rely on which to borrow a preposition to show possession. An example will show what I mean: Congress passed the statute, the purpose of which was to lower taxes....

 49,023 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

Past Indefinite Tense

...

 47,476 Views
added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Prepositions – At vs. In vs. On

In, at and on are commonly used prepositions and are used in different situations – be it telling adate, or time, or about a place and so on. Let’s discuss these prepositions and their uses in detailwith reference to time.Use...

 46,217 Views
added by acronimous
3 years ago

Center vs. Centre

Both "center" and "centre" refer to the same thing. As nouns, they signify the "middle" part or point of an area. As verbs, they refer to the action of placing something into the middle of something else.So why are they spelled differently, what is t...

 46,211 Views
added by malza
4 years ago

Perfect Tenses - How to Form

In addition to the three main tenses of present, past, and future, the English language allows us to make three statements about accomplished facts. We use one of the three perfect tenses to show an action that has taken place as of the prese...

 45,830 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

Future Indefinite Tense

Tenses hold the pillars of English grammar and keep it standing. Without tenses, English or any other language for that matter cannot exist or make sense. Whi...

 45,286 Views
added by angbeenc
2 years ago

Disorganized vs. Unorganized

Disorganized vs. Unorganized Alright, so we have two words referring to the same property, of "not being organized": "disorganized" and "unorganized". It is, therefore, a normal thing to ask yourself whether one of these words is wrong, whether they ...

 45,251 Views
added by malza
4 years ago

Specially vs. Especially

Specially Specially is an adverb that is used to indicate something done for a specific or special purpose. ...

 45,207 Views
added by ramyashankar
2 years ago

No One vs. Nobody

In today’s world, with a rise in feminism, the application of basic masculine pronouns makes it difficult for writers to write without receiving criticism. That leads to the writers switching to the use of nobody and no one in their writings. In th...

 44,553 Views
added by angbeenc
3 years ago

however

Mr. Strunk and Mr. White in The Elements of Style urge writers to avoid starting a sentence with “However.” It’s not a grammatical mistake to start a sentence with However. It’s just that good writers don’t do it. Instead, they start a con...

 44,005 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

Anyone vs. Any one

Have you ever wondered what the difference is between anyone and any one? Consider the sentences below; ...

 43,715 Views
added by angbeenc
4 years ago

Four Principal Parts or Forms of Verbs

Drink, Drank, Drunk, DrinkingMain verbs appear in four different forms:1. infinitive 2. finite 3. present participle 4. past participleIn Miss Hamrick’s class, we learned the principal parts of verbs, which are similar to my four ...

 43,462 Views
added by edgood
4 years ago

Inter vs. Intra

Prefixes and suffixes are a great component of grammar that allows new words to be created, in order to express certain messages more accurately. But some of them are really similar and it is sometimes hard to identify which one to use depending on t...

 43,109 Views
added by malza
4 years ago

Discuss these top articles page with the community:

0 Comments

    We need you!

    Help us build the largest grammar knowledge base and articles collection on the web!


    Improve your writing now:

    Download Grammar eBooks

    It’s now more important than ever to develop a powerful writing style. After all, most communication takes place in reports, emails, and instant messages.



    Browse Grammar.com