Joined: Jun 2020

Editorial »

Robert_Haigh   Junior Editor

My main artistic interests are music (I play guitar and ukulele, sing and write songs), photography (mainly landscapes, travel and family) and poetry. I began writing poems (not counting the few I wrote in school) in the 1990s, and I continue to enjoy writing them, along with the occasional short story. I have lived the whole of my life in West Yorkshire, England.

Latest Entries: (10 total)

racket vs. racquet

 The bat used in playing tennis and related games is either a racket or a racquet. Both forms are standard, so use either. However, the game resembling squash is always rackets in British English but racquets in Ameri...

added
9 days ago

show vs. shew

Professor R. L. Trask (Ph.D. in linguistics) has the following to say on show and shew: Except in quotations and in certain legal contexts, the spelling shew for show is now obsolete and should not be used. The past t...

added
9 days ago

sulphur vs. sulfur

For many years there has existed a difference in the spelling for the name of element number 16 with the symbol S. British English spelt it "sulphur" while North American Engli...

added
10 days ago

government vs. administration

In Britain, a government is the tenure of a particular prime minister, or the people who hold office during that tenure, as in the Blair government. The American equivalent is administration, as in the Obama adm...

added
10 days ago

despite vs. in spite of

These are equivalent in meaning. "The event went ahead despite the weather." "The event went ahead in spite of the weather."...

added
10 days ago

neologism

A neologism is a newly coined word, or a new use for an old word. An example of a neologism is the word webinar, for a seminar on the web or the Internet....

added
15 days ago

optimal vs. optimum

Both of these are technical terms in certain mathematical disciplines. Optimal and optimum both mean “best possible” or “most favorable.” Optimal is used solely as an adjective, as in “optimal method of completion, while optim...

added
16 days ago

normality vs. normalcy

Until recently normality was the established word, and normalcy was frowned upon by advocates of careful writing. Nowadays, however, normalcy is gaining momentum and is (almost) regarded as an accepted alternative to normality....

added
19 days ago

crimson vs. scarlet

Crimson denotes a deep shade of red. Scarlet denotes a bright shade of red....

added
19 days ago

comic, comical

Something is comic if it is intended to be funny. The word is mainly applied to skits, songs, plays and the like. "Tom Lehrer was famous for his comic songs."Something is comical if it is unintentionally funny. "Her portrayal of O...

added
19 days ago

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