Found 96 articles starting with R:

Race vs. Ethnicity

There are few situations where word choice matters more than in discussions of race and ethnicity. Such topi...

raillery - vocabulary

nounGood-humored satire, ridicule, or banter. There is a simple but effective test of satire, one that hails back to Aristotle. "Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor," he said, "for a sub...

Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein

Some words exist in English language which have same sounds but different meanings. Rain, reign and rein also fall in this category. These three words have almost similar pronunciations but their meanings and usage is totally different. Here are f...

raise - correct spelling

raise - verb and noun  Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses raise, rise, and rear. Click here...

Raise vs. Raze

Homophones are words that share the same pronunciation but differ in spelling and meaning, such as to, too, two; and so, sew, and sow. Homophones and confusingly similar words are the stuff that malapropisms are made of. A malapr...

Ranges of Numbers

You may use the hyphen (or the en dash) to show a range of numbers: These statistics appear on pages 54-56.  Previous: Chapter 10 - Hyphen ...

rapacious - vocabulary

adjectiveDisposed to seize by violence or by unlawful or greedy methods; extremely greedy, predatory, extortionate. The American goes to Paris, always has, and comes back and tells his neighbor, always...

raspberry - correct spelling

raspberry - noun  Example: The chef added one raspberry for color.Example: The cabbie gave him a ...

ravenous - vocabulary

adjectiveExtremely hungry, voracious, famished. The will to domination is a ravenous beast. There are never enough warm bodies to satiate its monstrous hunger. Once alive, this beast g...

Realise vs. Realize

There are many spelling differences between American and British English. In some cases, the same word will be spelled one way in American English and another way in British English. There are times when this inconsistency is ver...

realistic - correct spelling

realistic - adjective  Example: We have a realistic chance for success....

realistically - correct spelling

realistically - adverb  Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Cli...

realize - correct spelling

realize - verb  Example: She failed to realize the danger she faced.Example: The company will ...

Realize vs. Realise

She realized her mistake after it was too late. Or is it realised? Have you ever wondered what is the difference between realise with s and realize with a z...

really - correct spelling

really - adverb  Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here...

really, real

Real is an adjective meaning “genuine” or “authentic,” or having a “verifiable existence.”Really is an adverb ...

reason - correct spelling

reason - noun and verb  Example: She cited her boss’s stubbornness as the reason for her resignation. noun...

rebellion - correct spelling

rebellion - noun  Example: The tax increase started a rebellion in Boston....

recant - vocabulary

verbTo formally withdraw or disavow one's belief, position, or statement about something previously believed or maintained. I cannot and will not recant anything, for to go against conscien...

recapitulate - vocabulary

verbTo repeat again the principal points of; to summarize. “But, for heaven’s sake, don’t get hot!” said Stepan Arkadyevitch, touching his brother-in-law’s knee. “The matter is not ended. If you will allow ...

recede - correct spelling

recede - verb  Example: The waters started to recede....

receipt - correct spelling

receipt - noun  Example: He kept a receipt to prove the expense....

receive - correct spelling

receive - verb  Example: She will receive her guests in the garden....

recipe - correct spelling

recipe - noun  Example: He concocted a new recipe for deviled eggs....

reciprocal pronoun

We have only two of these pronouns, and they come in pairs: each other and one another. We use them to show some sort of a relationshi...

recluse - vocabulary

nounOne who lives in seclusion, often for religious meditation.Note: The adjective form is either recluse or reclusive. Henry David Thorea...

recognize - correct spelling

recognize - verb  Example: She failed to recognize him at first.Example: The company will ...

Recognize vs. Recognise

Recognize and recognise are the two spellings of the same word that are both acceptable and exchangeable but one spellings are more commonly used in one part of the world while the ...

recommend - correct spelling

recommend - verb  Example: I want to recommend a good book on grammar....

recuperate - correct spelling

recuperate - verb  Example: She went to the beach to recuperate....

redolent - vocabulary

adjectiveSmelling sweet and agreeable; also, suggestive or reminiscent.Note: The word redolent is often followed by the preposition of. They are very proper f...

redoubtable - vocabulary

adjectiveArousing awe or fear, formidable; commanding respect or reverence. In "Otto Preminger: The Man Who Would Be King," Brooklyn College film historian Foster Hirsch weaves interviews with industry...

reek, wreak

Reek means “to smell” or “to smoke.”Wreak means “to bring about,” “to cause,” or “to inflict.”The past tense and ...

reference - correct spelling

reference - noun and verb  Example: He will serve as my personal reference. nounExampl...

referred - correct spelling

referred - verb (past tense and past participle of the verb refer)  Not refered.Example: Sh...

referring - correct spelling

referring - verb (present participle of the verb refer)  Not refering.Example: The speaker was ...

reflexive pronoun

These are the ‑self words, as in myself, yourself, himself, herself, itself, ourselves, themselves. They are called reflexive and intensive pronouns and are used in two ways: (1) to...

refrigerator - correct spelling

refrigerator - noun  Not refridgerator.Example: Our grandchildren’s pictures adorn our refrigerator....

regale - vocabulary

verbTo entertain agreeably or lavishly, with food or drink; delight.Note: The word regale also acts as a noun, as in steaks were grilled for the regale of the guest...

regular verb

Verbs have four principal parts: (1) the infinitive, (2) the past, (3) the past participle, and (4) the present participle. A re...

rehearsal - correct spelling

rehearsal - noun  Example: At the orchestra’s rehearsal, the flute player fainted....

reign - correct spelling

reign - noun and verb  Example: During his first reign, the king expanded his territory. noun...

reign, rein, rain

To reign means “to rule.”A rein keeps your horse attached to the hitching post.Raindrops keep falling on your head.Example: He tugg...

relative pronoun

We have five relative pronouns in the English language: that, which, who (whoever), whom (whomever), and whose. Note that the personal relative pronouns (who, whom, whose) exhibit ...

relegate - vocabulary

verbTo send off or consign to an inferior position or remote destination; to assign or commit a task to a person; to banish or exile. Children need people in order to become human . . . . It is primarily th...

relevant - correct spelling

relevant - adjective  Example: He used Google® to find relevant information....

relieve - correct spelling

relieve - verb  Example: The relief pitcher will relieve him in the next inning....

relieving - correct spelling

relieving - verb (present participle of the verb relieve)  Example: We will be relieving our friend...

religious - correct spelling

religious - adjective and noun  Example: The religious man was shocked at the scenes in the movie. ...

remedy - correct spelling

remedy - noun and verb  Example: This cold remedy provided instant relief.Example: This should ...

remembrance - correct spelling

remembrance - noun  Not rememberanceExample: He left the flowers by the grave as a remembrance....

reminisce - correct spelling

reminisce - verb  Example: We got together to reminisce about the old days....

reminiscence - correct spelling

reminiscence - noun  Example: He wrote a reminiscence for his departed friend....

remiss - vocabulary

adjectiveNegligent, slow, careless in performing a task or duty; also, languid, sluggish. Perhaps this hut has never been required to shelter a shipwrecked man, and the benevolent person who promised t...

rendezvous - correct spelling

rendezvous - noun and verb  Example: The old inn by the sea was the couple’s rendezvous. noun...

renovate - correct spelling

renovate - verb  Example: My son and his wife will renovate their house next year....

renowned - correct spelling

renowned - adjective  Example: The paintings by the renowned artist brought top dollar....

repertory - vocabulary

nounA place where things are stored or gathered together, a collection; also, a type of theatrical presentation in which the theater group presents several works. Each writer is born with a repertor...

repetition - correct spelling

repetition - noun  Example: The writer used repetition of words to ensure a smooth flow....

replete - vocabulary

adjectiveFull to the uttermost, abundantly provided or supplied, filled with; complete, as in a legal brief replete in its citations to authority. The highway is replete with ...

representative - correct spelling

representative - adjective and noun  Example: These reports are representative of his writing style. ...

repute - vocabulary

nounEstimation in the view of others; reputation, as in a house of ill repute.verbTo believe a person or thing to be as specified; to regard.Note: The ...

requisite - vocabulary

nounA required thing, something necessary or indispensable.adjectiveNecessary or required for a particular purpose, as in the requisite skills. No wealth ca...

resemblance - correct spelling

resemblance - noun  Example: She bears a striking resemblance to Oprah Winfrey....

reservoir - correct spelling

nounExample: The swimmers used the reservoir to practice scuba diving....

Resign vs. Re-sign

Do you intend to re-sign the employment contract? ...

resistance - correct spelling

nounExample: “I am just a poor boy, though my story’s seldom told. I have squandered my resistance, For a pocketful of mumbles, such are promises. All lies ...

resource - correct spelling

nounExample: The library is a valuable resource for any student....

respectability - correct spelling

nounExample: She earned respectability through her good works....

respite - vocabulary

nounInterval of rest; a delay or cessation of anything trying or distressing. Whatever choice Elizabeth Bouvia may ultimately make, I can only hope that her courage, persistence and example will cause our s...

resplendent - vocabulary

adjectiveVery bright, shining brightly, gleaming, splendid, as in the dancers resplendent in their native costumes. In the luxuriance of a bowl of grapes set out in ritual display, in a bottle...

responsibility - correct spelling

nounExample: He took full responsibility for the actions of his staff....

restaurant - correct spelling

nounExample: The Italian restaurant featured the most wonderful pasta....

restrictive clause

A restrictive clause is also called a defining clause. The great grammarian Henry Fowler coined the term defining clause. A restrictive clause looks to the noun (or pronoun) modified and si...

Retch vs. Wretch

The English language doesn’t seem to be lacking in synonyms for the verb “vomit.” We have “upchuck,” “puke,” “hurl,” “heave,” and “retch,” to name a few. So do we really need to add another one, even if only as an alternate spell...

reticence, reticent - vocabulary

nounReticence: the quality of habitually keeping silent or being reserved in utterance.adjectiveReticent: disposed to be silent or reserved. Ted ha...

retroactive - vocabulary

adjectiveOperative on, affecting, or having reference to past events, transactions, responsibilities; pertaining to a pay raise effective in the past. In June, the Judiciary Committee subpoenaed the do...

retrospective - vocabulary

nounAn exhibition of art or performance of works produced by an artist or composer over time.adjectiveDirected to past events or situations; looking backward, looking back on. ...

revile - vocabulary

verbTo address or speak of with abuse; vilify, berate, disparage. You shall not revile God, or curse a leader of your people. —Exodus 22:28Old Testament...

rheumatism - correct spelling

nounExample: His rheumatism acts up when the weather changes....

rhythm - correct spelling

nounExample: My friend can’t dance. He has no rhythm....

rhythmical - correct spelling

adjectiveExample: The rhythmical motions of the dancers entranced the audience....

ridiculous - correct spelling

adjectiveExample: This ridiculous proposal has no chance of success....

rife - vocabulary

adjectiveOf frequent or common occurrence; in widespread existence, prevalent, use, or activity; abundant, numerous, plentiful. I love to see that Nature is so rife with life that myri...

Rifle vs. Riffle

...

right - correct spelling

adjective, noun, adverb, and verbGrammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses right, write, and rite. ...

right, write, rite

To be right means to be “correct” or “appropriate.”To write means “to form letters or words on a surface with an instrument such as a pen, pencil, or computer screen.”A r...

rise, raise, rear

All these words can be used to describe the movement of something from a lower to a higher level. The key to choosing one is: who is doing the movement and what is being moved.Rise is used when you are lifting yourse...

role - correct spelling

nounNot roll.Example: He knows the role he must play....

roll - correct spelling

verb and nounNot roleExample: The wagon will roll down the hill. v...

roommate - correct spelling

nounExample: Her roommate was neat and tidy....

rough - correct spelling

adjective, noun, adverb, and verb (complement verb rough up)Example: The ...

Rule of Parallel Structure

Though we’ll study parallel construction in the eBook Developing a Powerful Writing Style, I must introduce the concept here, for producing a parallel series re...

Rules on Direct Quotation

Many writers violate rules governing the use of quotation marks. They mix up the rules on which of the other punctuation marks go inside or outside the ending quotation marks. You'll find independent treatment of this issue in each chapter on each ma...

ruminate - vocabulary

verbTo chew over again, as food previously swallowed and regurgitated; to meditate about, ponder. Let's start with their explication of depression, which has metastasized in the West over the past two gener...

run-on sentence

A run-on sentence happens when a semicolon is omitted between two independent clauses not joined by a coordinating or correlative conjunction...

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