Word of the Day April 29, 2017

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Today's word: Tediumˈti di əm

This page provides all possible meanings and translations of the word Tedium

Princeton's WordNet

  1. boredom, ennui, tedium(noun)

    the feeling of being bored by something tedious

  2. tediousness, tedium, tiresomeness(noun)

    dullness owing to length or slowness

Wiktionary

  1. tedium(Noun)

    boredom or tediousness; ennui

  2. Origin: taedium, from taedere.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Tedium(noun)

    irksomeness; wearisomeness; tediousness

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Tedium

    tē′di-um, n. wearisomeness: irksomeness. [L. tædiumtædet, it wearies.]

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Tedium in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Tedium in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Sample Sentences & Example Usage

  1. Arnold Bennett:

    Having once decided to achieve a certain task, achieve it at all costs of tedium and distaste. The gain in self-confidence of having accomplished a tiresome labor is immense.

  2. Henry W. Fowler:

    Quotation ... A writer expresses himself in words that have been used before because they give his meaning better than he can give it himself, or because they are beautiful or witty, or because he expects them to touch a cord of association in his reader, or because he wishes to show that he is learned and well read. Quotations due to the last motive are invariably ill-advised the discerning reader detects it and is contemptuous the undiscerning is perhaps impressed, but even then is at the same time repelled, pretentious quotations being the surest road to tedium.

  3. Henry W. Fowler, A Dictionary of Modern English Usage (1926):

    Quotation ... A writer expresses himself in words that have been used before because they give his meaning better than he can give it himself, or because they are beautiful or witty, or because he expects them to touch a cord of association in his reader, or because he wishes to show that he is learned and well read. Quotations due to the last motive are invariably ill-advised; the discerning reader detects it and is contemptuous; the undiscerning is perhaps impressed, but even then is at the same time repelled, pretentious quotations being the surest road to tedium.

Images & Illustrations of Tedium


Translations for Tedium

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

Get even more translations for Tedium »

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