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Jewelry vs. Jewellery

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If your spouse has a birthday coming up, should you buy jewelry or jewellery? Choosing a birthday gift for a loved one can be a stressful shopping experience, but, luckily, knowing the difference between these two words do not have to be so nerve-racking. Even if your spouse wants something else as a gift, it is still a good idea to be aware of the difference between these two words. In reality, they are two versions of the same noun. One is used by American writers, and the other by British writers, so your gift choice might depend on whether you are living in America or England.

In this post, I will compare jewelry vs. jewellery. I will use each of these words in example sentences, so you can see them in context. Plus, I will show you a helpful memory tool that will allow you to choose jewellery or jewelry correctly every time.

Origin:

The word jewelry originated from late Middle English: from Old French juelerie, from juelier ‘jeweller’, from joel meaning jewel.

Jewelry as noun:

The word jewelry is used as a noun in English language where it means personal ornaments, such as necklaces, rings, or bracelets, that are typically made from or contain jewels and precious metal.

She had silver hair and chunky gold jewelry.

Use of jewelry:

Jewelry are the common spellings used in America, Canada and Australia etc. These are considered correct in these regions while all other spelling variations are considered wrong.

Examples:

Police in Rosenberg are hoping the public can help them find more than 30 watches stolen from a jewelry store last month. [Houston Chronicle]

Downtown Denver jeweler Damon Musselman is in his first season as a beekeeper. [Denver Post]

One of his favorite gifts is a jeweled white robe presented by Elvis Presley, adorned with the words “The People’s Champion.” [CNN]

Use of jewellery:

Jewellery is an alternate spelling of the same word. It is the preferred spelling in British English, while jewelry is the preferred spelling in American English. So if you belong to England or are writing for British audience, you should use these spellings.

Example:

Malka said the safe-deposit boxes were used to store both jewellery and loose diamonds in packets. –The Guardian

Jewelry or jewellery:

Jewelry and jewellery are alternate forms of the same word. The only difference between them is where they are used. American English writers have standardized around jewelry. British writers have made jewellery the standard form in their language community. Since jewellery has an extra L, like the city of London, England, it should be easy to remember that jewellery is the British version of this word.

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"Jewelry vs. Jewellery." Grammar.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2017. Web. 21 Nov. 2017. <http://www.grammar.com/jewelry_vs._jewellery>.

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