Found 268 articles starting with A:

aficionado - correct spelling

aficionado nounPlural aficionados.Example: John is a wine aficionado....

again - correct spelling

again adverbExample: Try to use your DVD player again....

against - correct spelling

against prepositionExample: We were young and strong, we were runnin' Against the wind. —Bob Seger....

Ageing vs. Aging

Spelling differences between American and British English are enough to give writers fits. The same word is often spelled differently, depending on the background of the writer. There are many different spelling conventions betwe...

aggrandize - vocabulary

aggrandizement - noun Aggrandizement: the act of increasing the size or importance of something or somebody. aggrandize - verb Aggrandize: to widen or increa...

aggravate - correct spelling

aggravate verbExample: Your constant exercise will aggravate your injury....

aggressive - correct spelling

aggressive adjectiveExample: Her aggressive attitude helped her succeed in sales....

agree

Watch out. Those who diminish our language have turned the intransitive verb agree into a transitive verb. R...

agree - correct spelling

agree verbExample: A subject must agree with its verb in number....

Aid vs. Aide

The English language is full of confusing words that sound alike and are spelled alike. Today’s two words are no exception. Aid and aide are homophones, which means they sound the same when verbally spoken, but they are spelled d...

aide, aid

The word aid is a verb that means “help.” We should note that aid may also be used as a noun in the same way that “help” can be us...

ail - correct spelling

ail verbExample: He will ail with this sickness....

air - correct spelling

air noun and verbExample: He wanted to clear the air. nounExample: He was able to ...

Air vs. Heir

Homophones in English are the words that have the same pronunciation but very different meanings and spellings. Air and heir are an example of a pair of homophones and cause a lot of confusion for beginners of English language an...

aisle - correct spelling

aisle nounExample: After years of dating, he was ready to walk down the aisle....

Aisle vs. Isle

Aisle and isle are one of the most confusing pair of words as they sound exactly alike and their spellings are almost similar too. There is however, a great difference between ...

alacrity - vocabulary

alacrity - noun A state of cheerful willingness, readiness, or promptness; liveliness or briskness, as in He accepted the promotion with alacrity. I have not that alacrity...

ale - correct spelling

ale nounExample: Let me buy you a bottle of ale....

alight - correct spelling

alight verb and adjectiveExample: He wanted to alight from the limo in style. verbExam...

all ready - correct spelling

all ready See already.See already, all ready in Grammar.com's section on Problem Words.As two words, ...

all ready, already

To figure out which of these is correct, look for a time element. Already as one word implies that there was a time limit and the task was completed ahead of it. (In casual conversation it is also sometimes used to add empha...

all right - correct spelling

all right adjective and adverbNote: The spelling alright is likely to raise the eyebrows of your readers. The fused words already and altogether...

all right, alright

Use two words: all right. The one-word alright is incorrect in American English....

all together - correct spelling

all together See altogether....

all, all of

allIn formal writing, omit the of after all. Remember the folk song: All My Trials Not:All ...

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