dennisc.52159

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dennisc.52159
  Junior Editor

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  November 2021     2 years ago

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Grammar.com
Apologies for the redundant comment. I thought the first failed to go through, so I tried again, rewriting in the process.

2 years ago

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Grammar.com
A surviving idiomatic usage, even in America, is illustrated thus: "If we fail in that, then all our effort will have been for naught" or "...will come to naught." Also, it's important to distinguish between its being a synonym for the word "zero" and its being the name for the numeral. The former is old-fashioned, the latter remains current, at least in Britain. 

2 years ago

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Grammar.com
While it's true that either word in the sense of "nothing" is old-fashioned, an example of its still-current idiomatic usage would be "If we fail in that, all our efforts will have been for naught" or "... will come to naught." Also, I'd say it remains current as the name of the numeral zero, but is old-fashioned as a general synonym for the word. 

2 years ago

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Quiz

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Identify the sentence with correct use of the gerund as the object of the preposition:
A She avoids to speak in public.
B They are good at to play the piano.
C He is not capable to understanding the situation.
D I am interested in learning new things.