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Fortunately vs. Luckily

FortunatelyFortunately is the adverb form of the word fortunate meaning a good or favorable situation that happened by chance. Fortune is derived from Latin and English and is a relatively new word (compared to luckily). For example:I only took $20 c...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

How to Come Up with a Niche and Ways to Make Your Blog Thrive

Don’t RushRegardless of your reason for creating one, the overall topic of your blog should be something you're passionate about. However, it’s important that you take things slow and come up with a plan. Rushing often leads to you making mistake...

added by acronimous
3 months ago

How to Improve Your English

Tips to improve English Both spoken and written English are integral skills for complete command over the language. Here we give you some important and sure-shot tips that will help you improve both your spoken and written English. Watch movies with ...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

Deal vs. Dealer

Deal vs. Dealer The word "dealer" dealer holds the same suffix “er” as "worker", "painter" or "cooker". If you understand these, there won't be any difficulty in understanding how "dealer" is formed from the word "deal". Adding the suffix "-er" t...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Dear vs. Deer

Dear vs. Deer We'll discuss what "dear" and "deer" mean in a minute. But before we start, let's quickly go through a short explanation on the coincidence that appears when pronouncing "dear vs. deer". Both words sound the same because of their almost...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Delegate vs. Delegation

Delegate vs. Delegation Just like the similar words "dental vs. dentist" or "reward vs. rewarding", "delegate vs. delegation" is a pair of words that are included in the same word family. This means that they both refer to the same concept, but have ...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Dental vs. Dentist

Dental vs. Dentist Both words, "dental" and "dentist" are related to teeth. They both refer to concepts related to the word teeth, therefore they are part of the same word family and it's understandable why they would have similar spellings. Even so,...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Fair vs. Fare #2

Are these two words similar to the "mold vs. mould" scenario?  The same definition spelled differently in UK and US English? Or are there more notable aspects to learn about "fair vs. fare"? Read this article and find out! Fair vs. Fare Let's st...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

In vs. Inn

So in order to give you a better idea of how common "in" is and how often it is used with multiple and distinct meanings in English phrases, let's explain both "in" and "inn" with relevant examples! In vs. Inn If things start nice and simply with "in...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Miss vs. Missing

Miss vs. Missing An important misunderstanding, in regard to the word "missing", is the false impression that it functions as a noun. That happens because some people tend to associate it with words such as "drawing" or "painting", which become nouns...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Mold vs. Mole

Even though "mold" and "mole" may look almost identically for the simple reason of coincidence, they refer to completely different things that we are going to discuss right away! Keep reading for some more detailed explanations and illustrative examp...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Odd vs. Odds

Odd vs. Odds Clarifying any misunderstandings is our top priority here, at Grammar.com. We want to make sure that we prepare the best explanations for the most confusing sets of words. This is certainly the case for "odd vs. odds", which can be misle...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Of vs. Off

It may be confusing and hard to know when to use "of" and when to use "off" in your writing. Frankly speaking, there is actually little you can do to logically understand these. You have to make sure you memorise these for good, and simply learn by h...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Quiz vs. Test

Quiz vs. Test Both "quiz" and "test" refer to some kind of evaluation or assessment - whether it is in an academic context or not. We seem to see the word "quiz" used often on the internet, rather than the word "test" usually in fun mini games where ...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Ram vs. RAM

Ram vs. RAM Practically, they are spelled with exactly the same letters. Obviously, they are both written and pronounced identically. So what distinguishes one from the other? And how can one actually explain how the same word, written with capital l...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Reward vs. Rewarding

The pair of words "reward" and "rewarding" can be very tricky. Especially when it's not clear for you which one is the verb and which one is the noun - or even an adjective? Let's help to get your thoughts in order, shall we? Reward vs. Rewarding Re...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Run On Sentences

Run on sentences are two sentences combined. They have a comma in between. Everyone has made a run on sentence. The way you can fix that is just put a period in between the two sentences. If you put a comma then that will be referred to as a comma. S...

added by GrammarX500
5 months ago

Offer vs. Offering

If "offer" and "offering" are confusing and causing you to question their accuracy in several phrases, then this article will certainly help you clarify some essential aspects about these words. Check the explanations below and remove any doubt regar...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Pail vs. Pale

Confusing them, sometimes often, is a natural result of how similar they are - so you are owed a clear explanation of their definitions, in order to understand once and for all, when to use "pail" and when to use "pale". So, if you're looking for tha...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Pain vs. Pane

Pain vs. Pane The first thing to remember regarding the differences between "pain" and "pane" is their grammatical functions, which are distinct. "Pain" can function both as a verb and as a noun in a sentence, whereas "pane" is always used as a noun ...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Peak vs. Peek

Let's take a closer look to what "peak" and "peek" mean in order to clarify every puzzling aspect of "peak vs. peek". Peak vs. Peek Not only are these words phonetically similar, but also syntactically, as both "peak" and "peek" can appear as verbs a...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Peal vs. Peel

"Peal" and "peel" may sound almost the same. This, for a non-native English user, might be confusing. If you find yourself wondering which spelling is correct for your context, or aim to understand what each word means and how it is correctly used, y...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Pedal vs. Peddle

You cannot replace one with the other, which makes it essential to clearly understand the definition and correct use of each. Read the explanations below to sort things out right now! Pedal vs. Peddle Besides the fact that they are spelled different...

added by Soulwriter
5 months ago

Learn about tense.

Past tense means that it already happened.He ran to the store.ran is the past tenseif it was present tense it would be:He run to the store.You wouldn't see that type of writing much.He will run to the store.That would be future tense.Most of the...

added by GrammarX500
5 months ago

families or family's

They are the last generation of their respective families. or They are the last generation of their respective family's....

added by sallyl.54909
6 months ago

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