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Future vs Feature

Future Perhaps, we use the word ‘future’ everyday to refer to what is going to happen next. Future is a time after the present (now). In English (and other languages), future is a verb tense that indicates a time which is yet to come. Future is u...

added by ramyashankar
3 years ago

Pi vs. Pie

Pi (π) is a mathematical constant that represents the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. It is an irrational number, meaning it cannot be expressed as a finite decimal or a fraction. The value of pi is approximately 3.14159, alt...

added by annie_l
3 years ago

Confirm Vs Conform

Confirm The more common of the two words, confirm is used to establish something as true using proof or facts. For example, to confirm a theory is to prove it using some facts, to confirm a plan is to make it 100%, to confirm a decision is to accept ...

added by ramyashankar
3 years ago

pro-drop

The property of a language in which a sentence does not require an overt subject. Spanish is a pro-drop language: it is perfectly normal in Spanish to say No canto bien (Don't sing well) rather than Yo no canto bien (I don't sing well). English is no...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

clipping

Clipping is a type of word-formation in which a short piece is extracted from a longer word and given the same meaning. Examples include bra from brassiere, gym from gymnasium, flu from influenza, cello from violoncello, phone from telephone and bus ...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Likeable vs. likable

Both spellings are acceptable in both British and American English, but British English strongly prefers likeable, while American English slightly prefers likable....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Copyright vs Copywrite

Copyright Copyright is a noun, which means exclusive legal rights of something – a work of art, music, document, poem, film name or any original work. This object or piece of work cannot be copied or used without permission from the owner or paymen...

added by ramyashankar
3 years ago

dissent vs. dissension

These words are not equivalent. Dissent is disagreement with an opinion, especially with a majority view. Dissension is serious and persistent disagreement among a group of people, especially ill-natured disagreement which leads to quarrels. ...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

dissatisfied vs. unsatisfied

When you are dissatisfied you are disappointed, unhappy or frustrated. When you are unsatisfied, you feel that you need more of something. Only a person can be dissatisfied, while an abstract thing like hunger or a demand for goods can be unsatisfied...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

waste vs. wastage

The word wastage is not a fancy equivalent for waste. Waste is failure to use something which could easily be used. But wastage is loss resulting from unavoidable natural causes, such as evaporation....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

obsolescent vs. obsolete

Something which is obsolescent is dropping out of use but is not yet entirely gone, while something which is obsolete has completely disappeared from use....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Childish vs. Childlike

Childish vs. Childlike: Navigating Distinctions in Behavior Understanding the differences between "childish" and "childlike" involves recognizing variations in behavior and connotations. This article aims to clarify the distinctions between "childish...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

ketchup, catchup, catsup

In British English, ketchup is the only form in use. American English still uses all three forms, though ketchup is the recommended form for American writers....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

learnèd word

A word taken from a classical language. For example, instead of breakable, English often uses the Latin word fragile; instead of dog we sometimes use the Latin word canine; instead of saying that a disease is catching, we often prefer the L...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

diachronic

Pertaining to the time element in language; involving change in a language over time. A diachronic approach to the study of a language is the study of its development over a period of time....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

tag question

A brief question which is tacked on to the end of a statement. English uses two different kinds of tag question, both of somewhat complex formation. Consider the statement Astrid is Norwegian. One kind of tag question extends this statement so as to ...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

minor sentence

Any piece of speech or writing which does not have the form of a complete sentence but which is normal in context. Examples: "Any news?"; "No smoking!"; "Hello."; "As if I would know."; "Wow!...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

double negative

Any construction in which two or more negative words occur in a single clause. Examples 1: "I didn't see nothing" (= I didn't see anything); Examples 2: "No football team can't win no championship without no defenders" (= No football team can win a c...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

COVID-19 Capitalization

The word "coronavirus" is not a proper noun, and is not the name of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. Therefore, "CoronaVirus", "Coronavirus", and "Corona Virus" are invalid. Adding a space, like in "corona virus", is also invalid.You can't say someon...

added by ryan_1
3 years ago

plurale tantum

 A NOUN which is invariably plural in form, even though it may be singular in sense. Examples include oats, cattle, remains, pants, scissors, binoculars, pyjamas, shorts and tweezers. Such nouns are awkward to count: we cannot say *a pants or * ...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

phoney vs. phony

Which spelling is correct? Both are acceptable. British English prefers phoney, while American English prefers phony....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Snicker vs. Snigger

Meanings: Snicker: The term "snicker" refers to a suppressed or stifled laugh, expressing amusement subtly. It conveys a lighthearted sense of mirth without an overt display. A snicker is often a discreet expression of amusement that does not carry s...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Forbid vs. Prohibit

Forbid vs. Prohibit: Navigating Distinctions in Restriction Understanding the differences between "forbid" and "prohibit" involves recognizing variations in language and the nuances of restriction. This article aims to clarify the distinctions betwee...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Derisive vs. Derisory

Derisive vs. Derisory: Navigating Distinctions in Criticism Understanding the differences between "derisive" and "derisory" involves recognizing variations in criticism and language. This article aims to clarify the distinctions between "derisive" an...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

imposter vs. impostor

The spellings imposter and impostor are both widely used, and both are acceptable, but some authorities prefer impostor. Etymology To grasp the disparities between "imposter" and "impostor," it is essential to understand their etymological roots. Bo...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

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    Quiz

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    Identify the sentence with correct use of the past continuous tense:
    A We will be arriving at the airport shortly.
    B She has already finished her work.
    C He finished his book before the movie started.
    D They were playing tennis when it started to rain.