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show vs. shew

Professor R. L. Trask (Ph.D. in linguistics) has the following to say on show and shew: Except in quotations and in certain legal contexts, the spelling shew for show is now obsolete and should not be used. The past tense of show is always showe...

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

sulphur vs. sulfur

For many years there has existed a difference in the spelling for the name of element number 16 with the symbol S. British English spelt it "sulphur" while North American English used the phonetic spelling "sulfur". In the late 20thC, the Internation...

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

government vs. administration

In Britain, a government is the tenure of a particular prime minister, or the people who hold office during that tenure, as in the Blair government. The American equivalent is administration, as in the Obama administration. In the US, the g...

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

despite vs. in spite of

These are equivalent in meaning. "The event went ahead despite the weather." "The event went ahead in spite of the weather."...

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

neologism

A neologism is a newly coined word, or a new use for an old word. An example of a neologism is the word webinar, for a seminar on the web or the Internet....

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

optimal vs. optimum

Both of these are technical terms in certain mathematical disciplines. Optimal and optimum both mean “best possible” or “most favorable.” Optimal is used solely as an adjective, as in “optimal method of completion, while optimum functions a...

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

normality vs. normalcy

Until recently normality was the established word, and normalcy was frowned upon by advocates of careful writing. Nowadays, however, normalcy is gaining momentum and is (almost) regarded as an accepted alternative to normality....

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

crimson vs. scarlet

Crimson denotes a deep shade of red. Scarlet denotes a bright shade of red....

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

comic, comical

Something is comic if it is intended to be funny. The word is mainly applied to skits, songs, plays and the like. "Tom Lehrer was famous for his comic songs."Something is comical if it is unintentionally funny. "Her portrayal of Ophelia was comical."...

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

Rules For Using Single Quotation Marks

When it comes to punctuation rules, even the most experienced writers have hesitations. These rules are vague. So, if you found yourself doubting whether you need that quotation mark and which one should go there, read the following recommendations. ...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Active Voice vs. Passive Voice

Active and passive voice sounds like something complex and complicated, but really, it's not. It's about the relation existing between the subject and the action of a sentence, more exactly about who does what. But the best way to understand these is...

added by malza
1 year ago

Come get it vs. Come and get it

Some expressions are so often used on the internet wrongly, that they start to seem right and, sometimes, they actually become acceptable, at least informally. “Come get it” and “come and get it” is one of these examples – they are expressi...

added by malza
1 year ago

Use of the word southern

please share your quote for replacing the portion of the fence bordering your property's southern border...

added by Bgj721
1 year ago

Multiple meaning words

Word number 1: SpareFirst meaning: Spare someone's life-let someone liveE.g. The knight decided to spare the dragon's life.Second meaning: Spare as in spare tire-additionalE.g. Do you have a spare tire for my car? Word number 2: ScaleFirst meani...

added by Sir Almond
1 year ago

Discreet and discrete difference

Discreet means to be careful, undetected, example: a discreet cough. Discrete means to be individual, detached, for example, the grammar discrete is at the next page...

added by Sir Almond
1 year ago

Difference between glimpse and glance

The difference is that a glance is deliberate. For example, you glanced at the new toy yearningly. A glimpse is also a short look just like glance, but its not on purpose-its accidental. For example, out of the corner of my eye, I caught a glimpse of...

added by Sir Almond
1 year ago

Lose vs. Loss

Lose and loss are a pair of words that have somewhat similar meanings which cause the most people to confuse them and use them in each other’s place.Today I will discuss the meanings and usage of both these words with examples so learners of Englis...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Destroy or Destruct

Destroy and destruct are synonyms to each other.Synonyms are the pair of words which have similar meanings to each other and may be used in each other’s place.Destroy as verb:In English language, destroy is used as a verb which means to end somethi...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Closer vs. Closure

Homophones are words in English language that are pronounced the same way but have different spellings and meanings. One such pair of words is closer and closure.I will discuss their meaning and usage in English language in detail today.Closer as nou...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Aspiration vs. Inspiration

Aspiration and inspiration are two words that have little spelling difference but a huge difference in their meanings.Today I will talk about both these terms in detail to differentiate in their meaning and usage in English language.Aspiration as nou...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Into vs. In to

Although considered an easy and simple language, English language has its fair share of confusions. There are many words that are spelled and spoken the same way but have some minor differences in writing and huge differences in meaning. One such exa...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Generalise vs. Generalize

There are some minor differences in spellings of the same world in different parts of the world. Generalize and generalise also belong to the same category of words.Generalize as verb:Generalize is a verb used in English language and it originated fr...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

To vs. Too

There are some pairs of words that are easily mixed up with one and another. One example of such pair of words is too and to.Today I will discuss both of them in detail.To as preposition:To is used as a preposition which means to express motion in a ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Poser vs. Poseur

There are some very confusing pairs of words in English language which have very different meanings from each other.Poser as noun:In English language poser is used as a noun which means someone who poses or stands or sits in a specific manner.Example...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Instrumental Compounds

Among many other complex English grammar terms and elements, one is instrumental words or compounds.Today I will talk about their meaning and usage in English language and grammar.Instrumental Compound:A compound which is mostly an adjective in which...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

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