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Adverb vs. Verb

A word usually used to describe a verb or adjective.A word that expresses an action or a state of being....

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Advance vs. Advanced

To move forward or to make progress.Happening before something else, as in advance warning.To lend money.A movement forward made by a group of soldiers.If something has reached an advanced stage, it's nearly finished or fully developed.Advanced work ...

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Across vs. Cross

From one side of to the other side of.On the other side of.To go from one side to the other.Angry and not pleased.The shape x is a cross.An upright post with a horizontal bar that crosses it or a pendant shaped this way.To draw a line through.To inte...

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Account vs. Accountant

A description of something that has happened, as in an account of the accident.An arrangement to keep money in a bank, as in a checking or savings account.Records of money earned and spent.If you account for something, you explain it.An expert in mon...

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Accept vs. Except

To take something that you are offered.To agree to something.Apart from.But for the fact that....

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Academic vs. Academy

To do with study and learning.Someone who teaches in a university or college or someone who does research.A private junior high, middle school, or high school.A school that teaches special subjects, as in a military academy....

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Absorb vs. Absorbent

To soak up liquid.To take in information.If something absorbs you, it takes up all your attention.Something that soaks up liquid, such as a washcloth, towel, or sponge, is absorbent....

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Aboard vs. Abroad

On or into a train, ship, or aircraft.In or to another country....

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Abbreviate vs. Abbreviation

To make something shorter, such as a word.A short way of writing a word....

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Abandon vs. Abandoned

To leave forever.To give up.Deserted or no longer used....

added by annie_l
10 months ago

Check out vs Checkout

Check out Check out is a phrasal verb of the word check, which has 2 meanings: to look at someone/somethingto sign for something (like a will) You can also add a noun or pronoun between the words, like ‘check this out’, ‘check the items out’ ...

added by ramyashankar
10 months ago

Won’t vs. Wouldn’t

Won’tWon’t is a modal verb. It is the short form (contraction) for ‘will not’. It is the negative of the word ‘will’. It is used to talk about future tense. It is always used with an apostrophe (‘).Examples:I will not go to college toda...

added by ramyashankar
11 months ago

Warrant vs. Justify

WarrantWarrant is a notification, warning or advice to someone. It can also be used to caution someone against a potential danger. Warrant is usually used for mentioning things (not people). For example, if something warrants an action, then that act...

added by ramyashankar
11 months ago

In Year vs. On Year

in (the/this) <year>We use the preposition ‘in’ to indicate something that’s inside. In the context of time, ‘in’ is used for long durations of time. For example, a month, week or year. Usually, we specify the year when we use ‘in...

added by ramyashankar
11 months ago

Wedding vs Marriage

Wedding Wedding is the name given for the rituals, events and ceremonies that take place when two people take vows to live together for rest of their life. It is an indication of social acceptance of the relationship. Wedding is used to indicate the ...

added by ramyashankar
11 months ago

Story vs. Storey

Story An absolutely common word, story is used by everyone to describe events that are real or imaginary, usually told for entertainment. Story can be short or long and can describe past, present, or possible future events. Story is a noun, and its p...

added by ramyashankar
12 months ago

Subjective Vs Subjunctive

Subjective Subjective is an adjective that means a report or statement submitted based on a person’s individual ideas and opinions. Subjective statements are usually lengthy and represent personal opinions rather than facts. Subjective ideas and st...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Felicitate vs Facilitate

Felicitate To felicitate someone means to congratulate someone, give them respect. The word originated from the Latin word ‘felix’ meaning happy which was translate to late Latin ‘felicitare’ meaning pronounce as happy or fortunate. It is pro...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Destruction Vs Distraction

Destruction The noun destruction means to ruin or demolish something. It can be a car, a person’s career, a house etc. Destruction is used to indicate some mishap that has occurred on a large scale. The verb for destruction is destroy which is the ...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Override vs Overwrite

Override Override means to add to or enhance something apart from its existing behaviour. It is used very commonly in programming languages. For example, you have generic procedures and rules that all the employees of your company should follow, but ...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Future vs Feature

Future Perhaps, we use the word ‘future’ everyday to refer to what is going to happen next. Future is a time after the present (now). In English (and other languages), future is a verb tense that indicates a time which is yet to come. Future is u...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

Confirm Vs Conform

Confirm The more common of the two words, confirm is used to establish something as true using proof or facts. For example, to confirm a theory is to prove it using some facts, to confirm a plan is to make it 100%, to confirm a decision is to accept ...

added by ramyashankar
1 year ago

pro-drop

The property of a language in which a sentence does not require an overt subject. Spanish is a pro-drop language: it is perfectly normal in Spanish to say No canto bien (Don't sing well) rather than Yo no canto bien (I don't sing well). English is no...

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

clipping

Clipping is a type of word-formation in which a short piece is extracted from a longer word and given the same meaning. Examples include bra from brassiere, gym from gymnasium, flu from influenza, cello from violoncello, phone from telephone and bus ...

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

Likeable vs. likable

Both spellings are acceptable in both British and American English, but British English strongly prefers likeable, while American English slightly prefers likable....

added by RobertHaigh
1 year ago

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