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Run On Sentences

Run on sentences are two sentences combined. They have a comma in between. Everyone has made a run on sentence. The way you can fix that is just put a period in between the two sentences. If you put a comma then that will be referred to as a comma. S...

added by GrammarX500
2 years ago

Offer vs. Offering

If "offer" and "offering" are confusing and causing you to question their accuracy in several phrases, then this article will certainly help you clarify some essential aspects about these words. Check the explanations below and remove any doubt regar...

added by Soulwriter
2 years ago

Pail vs. Pale

Confusing them, sometimes often, is a natural result of how similar they are - so you are owed a clear explanation of their definitions, in order to understand once and for all, when to use "pail" and when to use "pale". So, if you're looking for tha...

added by Soulwriter
2 years ago

Pain vs. Pane

Pain vs. Pane The first thing to remember regarding the differences between "pain" and "pane" is their grammatical functions, which are distinct. "Pain" can function both as a verb and as a noun in a sentence, whereas "pane" is always used as a noun ...

added by Soulwriter
2 years ago

Peak vs. Peek

Let's take a closer look to what "peak" and "peek" mean in order to clarify every puzzling aspect of "peak vs. peek". Peak vs. Peek Not only are these words phonetically similar, but also syntactically, as both "peak" and "peek" can appear as verbs a...

added by Soulwriter
2 years ago

Peal vs. Peel

"Peal" and "peel" may sound almost the same. This, for a non-native English user, might be confusing. If you find yourself wondering which spelling is correct for your context, or aim to understand what each word means and how it is correctly used, y...

added by Soulwriter
2 years ago

Pedal vs. Peddle

You cannot replace one with the other, which makes it essential to clearly understand the definition and correct use of each. Read the explanations below to sort things out right now! Pedal vs. Peddle Besides the fact that they are spelled different...

added by Soulwriter
2 years ago

Learn about tense.

Past tense means that it already happened.He ran to the store.ran is the past tenseif it was present tense it would be:He run to the store.You wouldn't see that type of writing much.He will run to the store.That would be future tense.Most of the...

added by GrammarX500
2 years ago

families or family's

They are the last generation of their respective families. or They are the last generation of their respective family's....

added by sallyl.54909
2 years ago

Halt vs. Halter

Introduction English is a language known for its complexity, and it often presents words that share similar sounds but have distinct meanings. 'Halt' and 'halter' are two such words that may occasionally be used interchangeably due to their phonetic ...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Halftime vs. Halfway

Introduction English is a language renowned for its intricacies, often offering words that, while distinct, may seem similar due to their phonetic likeness. 'Halftime' and 'halfway' are two such words that, because of their shared prefix, can occasio...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Hairdo vs. Hairy

Introduction English is a language rich in homophones, words that sound similar but have different meanings. 'Hairdo' and 'hairy' are two such words that may occasionally be used interchangeably due to their phonetic resemblance. This essay aims to e...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Haircut vs. Hairdresser

Introduction English is a language rich in vocabulary and often presents words that share similar themes and can be confusing when used interchangeably. 'Haircut' and 'hairdresser' are two such words that, while related, have distinct meanings and ro...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Gas Mask vs. Gas Station

Introduction English is a language renowned for its nuances and occasional similarities between words that can lead to confusion. 'Gas mask' and 'gas station' are two such words, both involving the term 'gas,' but with entirely different meanings and...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Gas vs. Gasoline

Introduction English is a language known for its subtleties and occasional similarities between words that can lead to confusion. 'Gas' and 'gasoline' are two such words, both including the word 'gas,' but with different meanings and grammatical role...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Gangplank vs. Gangway

Introduction English is a language known for its subtleties and occasional similarities between words that can lead to confusion. 'Gangplank' and 'gangway' are two such words, both used in the context of ships and maritime activities. However, they h...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Gang vs. Gangster

Introduction The words 'Gang' and 'Gangster' are frequently encountered in various contexts, but their precise meanings can be confusing due to their overlap in certain situations. In this essay, we will delve into their differences and similarities,...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Frequency vs. Frequent

Introduction Words like 'Frequency' and 'Frequent' are commonly used in everyday language, often interchangeably. However, they serve different linguistic purposes and have unique grammatical features. In this essay, we will delve into their differen...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

French Fries vs. French Horn

Introduction The words 'French Fries' and 'French Horn' both incorporate the adjective 'French,' which can sometimes lead to confusion, but they refer to entirely different concepts in the English language. In this article, we will delve into their d...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Freight vs Freighter

Introduction The words 'Freight' and 'Freighter' are encountered frequently in logistics and transportation contexts, often leading to confusion due to their apparent similarity. However, they serve different linguistic functions and have distinct hi...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Fate vs. Fateful

Introduction The words 'Fate' and 'Fateful' are often used in literature and everyday conversation, sometimes interchangeably. However, they have subtle differences in meaning and usage, making it essential to distinguish between them. In this articl...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Emu vs. Emulsion

Introduction The words 'Emu' and 'Emulsion' may appear similar at first glance due to their shared letter sequence 'em,' but they refer to entirely different concepts in the English language. In this article, we will explore their differences and sim...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Elder vs. Elderly

Introduction The words 'Elder' and 'Elderly' are often used to describe individuals of advanced age, but they have nuanced differences that can lead to confusion. In this article, we will explore their distinctions and similarities, focusing on gramm...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Economize vs. Economy

Introduction The words 'Economize' and 'Economy' are often used in discussions related to saving resources or managing finances. However, they serve different linguistic purposes and have unique grammatical features. In this article, we will delve in...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Economical vs. Economics

Introduction The words 'Economical' and 'Economics' are closely related but serve different linguistic purposes and are often used in different contexts. In this article, we will delve into their differences and similarities, with a focus on grammar,...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

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    Quiz

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    Identify the sentence with correct use of the past perfect continuous tense:
    • A. I have played the piano yesterday.
    • B. We were visiting the museum all day.
    • C. She had been studying for hours before the exam.
    • D. He had sings a song for the audience.