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double negative

Any construction in which two or more negative words occur in a single clause. Examples 1: "I didn't see nothing" (= I didn't see anything); Examples 2: "No football team can't win no championship without no defenders" (= No football team can win a c...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

COVID-19 Capitalization

The word "coronavirus" is not a proper noun, and is not the name of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. Therefore, "CoronaVirus", "Coronavirus", and "Corona Virus" are invalid. Adding a space, like in "corona virus", is also invalid.You can't say someon...

added by ryan_1
3 years ago

plurale tantum

 A NOUN which is invariably plural in form, even though it may be singular in sense. Examples include oats, cattle, remains, pants, scissors, binoculars, pyjamas, shorts and tweezers. Such nouns are awkward to count: we cannot say *a pants or * ...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

phoney vs. phony

Which spelling is correct? Both are acceptable. British English prefers phoney, while American English prefers phony....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Snicker vs. Snigger

Meanings: Snicker: The term "snicker" refers to a suppressed or stifled laugh, expressing amusement subtly. It conveys a lighthearted sense of mirth without an overt display. A snicker is often a discreet expression of amusement that does not carry s...

added by courtneye
3 years ago

Forbid vs. Prohibit

Forbid vs. Prohibit: Navigating Distinctions in Restriction Understanding the differences between "forbid" and "prohibit" involves recognizing variations in language and the nuances of restriction. This article aims to clarify the distinctions betwee...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Derisive vs. Derisory

Derisive vs. Derisory: Navigating Distinctions in Criticism Understanding the differences between "derisive" and "derisory" involves recognizing variations in criticism and language. This article aims to clarify the distinctions between "derisive" an...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

imposter vs. impostor

The spellings imposter and impostor are both widely used, and both are acceptable, but some authorities prefer impostor. Etymology To grasp the disparities between "imposter" and "impostor," it is essential to understand their etymological roots. Bo...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Bosphorus vs. Bosporus

Both Bosporus and Bosphorus are acceptable spellings for the narrow, natural strait and internationally significant waterway located in northwestern Turkey. ...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Euphemism vs. Euphuism

Euphemism vs. Euphuism: Navigating Distinctions in Language Understanding the differences between "euphemism" and "euphuism" involves recognizing variations in language and communication. This article aims to clarify the distinctions between "euphemi...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

"A" and "AN" - How to use?

Hi friends,The general rule is that, “an” is to be used before a vowel and “a” is to beUsed before a consonant.This rule is applicable in most of the situations.But in some cases the word “an” is used before consonant and at the same time...

added by ahilankan
3 years ago

Why is Learning Foreign Languages Exciting?

At school, we learn a foreign language for several years, in most cases, because of the academic program. For our age and brief life experience, we underestimate the importance of knowing a different language and speaking fluently in it. Following gr...

added by acronimous
3 years ago

Saccharin vs. Saccharine

Saccharin vs. Saccharine: Navigating Distinctions in Sweeteners Understanding the differences between "saccharin" and "saccharine" involves recognizing variations in terminology and usage. This article aims to clarify the distinctions between "saccha...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

racket vs. racquet

 The bat used in playing tennis and related games is either a racket or a racquet. Both forms are standard, so use either. However, the game resembling squash is always rackets in British English but racquets in American English....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

show vs. shew

Professor R. L. Trask (Ph.D. in linguistics) has the following to say on show and shew: Except in quotations and in certain legal contexts, the spelling shew for show is now obsolete and should not be used. The past tense of show is always showe...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

sulphur vs. sulfur

For many years there has existed a difference in the spelling for the name of element number 16 with the symbol S. British English spelt it "sulphur" while North American English used the phonetic spelling "sulfur". In the late 20thC, the Internation...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Government vs. Administration

Government vs. Administration: Navigating Distinctions in Governance Understanding the differences between "government" and "administration" involves recognizing variations in roles and functions within the framework of governance. This article aims ...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

despite vs. in spite of

These are equivalent in meaning. "The event went ahead despite the weather." "The event went ahead in spite of the weather."...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

neologism

A neologism is a newly coined word, or a new use for an old word. An example of a neologism is the word webinar, for a seminar on the web or the Internet....

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Optimal vs. Optimum

Optimal vs. Optimum: Navigating Distinctions in Usage Understanding the differences between "optimal" and "optimum" involves recognizing variations in usage and preference. This article aims to clarify the distinctions between "optimal" and "optimum,...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

normality vs. normalcy

Normality vs. Normalcy: Navigating Distinctions in Usage Understanding the differences between "normality" and "normalcy" involves recognizing variations in usage and acceptance. This article aims to clarify the distinctions between "normality" and "...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

crimson vs. scarlet

Crimson vs. Scarlet: Navigating Distinctions in Colors Understanding the differences between "crimson" and "scarlet" involves recognizing variations in color terminology. This article aims to clarify the distinctions between "crimson" and "scarlet," ...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

comic, comical

Something is comic if it is intended to be funny. The word is mainly applied to skits, songs, plays and the like. "Tom Lehrer was famous for his comic songs."Something is comical if it is unintentionally funny. "Her portrayal of Ophelia was comical."...

added by RobertHaigh
3 years ago

Rules For Using Single Quotation Marks

When it comes to punctuation rules, even the most experienced writers have hesitations. These rules are vague. So, if you found yourself doubting whether you need that quotation mark and which one should go there, read the following recommendations. ...

added by acronimous
3 years ago

Active Voice vs. Passive Voice

Active and passive voice sounds like something complex and complicated, but really, it's not. It's about the relation existing between the subject and the action of a sentence, more exactly about who does what. But the best way to understand these is...

added by malza
4 years ago

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    Quiz

    Are you a grammar master?

    »
    Identify the sentence with correct use of the gerund as the object of the preposition:
    A I am interested in reading books.
    B He is not capable of understanding the situation.
    C She avoids speaking in public.
    D They are good at playing the guitar.