Found 86 articles starting with H:

hackney - vocabulary

verb
To make stale or trite by frequent use or repetition.Note: As a noun, hackney means a carriage or coach for hire. As a proper noun, Hackney...

Haircut vs. Hairdresser

When you get a haircut, someone cuts and styles your hair.Someone who cuts and styles people’s hair....

Hairdo vs. Hairy

The way hair is styled or arranged.Covered with air.Dangerous and frightening....

halcyon - vocabulary

adjective
Calm, peaceful, as in halcyon weather; rich, wealthy, as in halcyon days of peace; happy, carefree, as in the halcyon days of our youth. It was a halcyon...

half - correct spelling

half - noun, adjective, and adverb
Example: She ordered only a half. noun...

Halftime vs. Halfway

A short break in the middle of a game such as football, basketball, or hockey.Half the distance from one point to another.Not thorough or complete.To or at half the distance....

Halt vs. Halter

To stop.A rope or strap used to lead or tie an animal such as a horse.A woman's top with a band that ties behind the neck, leaving the back and shoulders bare....

hammer - correct spelling

hammer - noun and verb
Example: “If I had a hammer, I’d hammer in the mo...

handful, handfuls

The proper plural is handfuls, not handsful.Consider this usage note from Dictionary.com
. The plurals of nouns ending...

handfuls - correct spelling

handfuls - noun
The preferred spelling is handfuls.Example: He gave the poor man several handfuls of coins.Consider ...

handkerchief - correct spelling

handkerchief - noun
Not hankerchief.Example: She always used her handkerchief when she sneezed....

Hands on vs. Hands-on

Hands-on" approach, "hands-on" experience, "hands-on" work - using this structure has become very common especially during the last years, in the English vocabulary. It is a very popular way of presenting one's practical experience in a CV, a letter ...

handsful - incorrect spelling

handsful  See handfuls
....

Hanged vs. Hung

The traitor was hanged for treason. ...

hanged, hung

Both hanged and hung are past-participial and past-tense forms of the ...

happily - correct spelling

happily - adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for t...

happiness - correct spelling

happiness - noun
Example: “Money can’t buy happiness.” ** "Money can buy material things, but real happiness must be truly earned.” N...

harass - correct spelling

harass - verb
Not harrass.Example: These annual fundraisers will harass the listeners again....

harass - vocabulary

verb
To bother continually; to torment, usually with troubles or cares; to pester.Note: You may pronounce it either way, with the accent on the first syllable or the last. In American English, the b...

harass, harrass

The correct spelling is harass.You may pronounce it either way, with an accent on the first syllable or the last. In American English, the better pronunciation accents the second syllable....

harbinger - vocabulary

noun
One who or that which foreruns and announces the coming of any person or thing; anything that foreshadows a coming thing or event. Now the bright morning star, day’s harbinger, Comes da...

Harbour vs. Harbor

It might seem difficult to make a difference between "harbour" and "harbor", but it shouldn't at all. Everything here is about the different spellings preferred by American and British English, or more exactly by US and UK English.More exactl...

Hardy vs. Hearty

Hardy" and "hearty" are both common English words, frequently used in descriptions. But the fact that they look and sound almost identical due to their similar spellings can create confusions among the readers. You might actually think they mean the ...

Heal vs. Heel

Heal" and "heel" define ever so different concepts and this explains why it is so important that you don't confuse them. If you use "heel" instead of "heal", or vice versa, they will certainly be major misspellings, even if they are spelled so simila...

healthful, healthy

There is a very technical distinction between these two that is slowly wearing away. In their strictest senses, healthy means “possessing good health” and healthful nmeans “conducive to good health,” but the...

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