Found 85 articles starting with H:

hackney - vocabulary

verb
To make stale or trite by frequent use or repetition.Note: As a noun, hackney means a carriage or coach for hire. As a proper noun, Hackney...

Haircut vs. Hairdresser

When you get a haircut, someone cuts and styles your hair.Someone who cuts and styles people’s hair....

Hairdo vs. Hairy

The way hair is styled or arranged.Covered with air.Dangerous and frightening....

halcyon - vocabulary

adjective
Calm, peaceful, as in halcyon weather; rich, wealthy, as in halcyon days of peace; happy, carefree, as in the halcyon days of our youth. It was a halcyon...

half - correct spelling

half - noun, adjective, and adverb
Example: She ordered only a half. noun...

Halftime vs. Halfway

A short break in the middle of a game such as football, basketball, or hockey.Half the distance from one point to another.Not thorough or complete.To or at half the distance....

Halt vs. Halter

To stop.A rope or strap used to lead or tie an animal such as a horse.A woman's top with a band that ties behind the neck, leaving the back and shoulders bare....

hammer - correct spelling

hammer - noun and verb
Example: “If I had a hammer, I’d hammer in the mo...

handful, handfuls

The proper plural is handfuls, not handsful.Consider this usage note from Dictionary.com
. The plurals of nouns ending...

handfuls - correct spelling

handfuls - noun
The preferred spelling is handfuls.Example: He gave the poor man several handfuls of coins.Consider ...

handkerchief - correct spelling

handkerchief - noun
Not hankerchief.Example: She always used her handkerchief when she sneezed....

Hands on vs. Hands-on

Hands-on" approach, "hands-on" experience, "hands-on" work - using this structure has become very common especially during the last years, in the English vocabulary. It is a very popular way of presenting one's practical experience in a CV, a letter ...

handsful - incorrect spelling

handsful  See handfuls
....

Hanged vs. Hung

The traitor was hanged for treason. ...

hanged, hung

Both hanged and hung are past-participial and past-tense forms of the ...

happily - correct spelling

happily - adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for t...

happiness - correct spelling

happiness - noun
Example: “Money can’t buy happiness.” ** "Money can buy material things, but real happiness must be truly earned.” N...

harass - correct spelling

harass - verb
Not harrass.Example: These annual fundraisers will harass the listeners again....

harass - vocabulary

verb
To bother continually; to torment, usually with troubles or cares; to pester.Note: You may pronounce it either way, with the accent on the first syllable or the last. In American English, the b...

harass, harrass

The correct spelling is harass.You may pronounce it either way, with an accent on the first syllable or the last. In American English, the better pronunciation accents the second syllable....

harbinger - vocabulary

noun
One who or that which foreruns and announces the coming of any person or thing; anything that foreshadows a coming thing or event. Now the bright morning star, day’s harbinger, Comes da...

Harbour vs. Harbor

It might seem difficult to make a difference between "harbour" and "harbor", but it shouldn't at all. Everything here is about the different spellings preferred by American and British English, or more exactly by US and UK English.More exactl...

Hardy vs. Hearty

Hardy" and "hearty" are both common English words, frequently used in descriptions. But the fact that they look and sound almost identical due to their similar spellings can create confusions among the readers. You might actually think they mean the ...

Heal vs. Heel

Heal" and "heel" define ever so different concepts and this explains why it is so important that you don't confuse them. If you use "heel" instead of "heal", or vice versa, they will certainly be major misspellings, even if they are spelled so simila...

healthful, healthy

There is a very technical distinction between these two that is slowly wearing away. In their strictest senses, healthy means “possessing good health” and healthful nmeans “conducive to good health,” but the...

healthy - correct spelling

healthy - adjective
Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses healthy and healthful. Click here for that discussion....

hear - correct spelling

hear - verb
Not here
.Example: He will usually hear only what he wants to ...

heard - correct spelling

heard - verb (past tense and past participle of the verb hear)  Example: We have he...

heavy - correct spelling

heavy - adjective
Example: The heavy equipment arrived at the construction site....

height - correct spelling

height - noun
Not heighth.Note: Pronounce this word with a hard ending “t” sound, not a “th” sound.See Problem Words for a discussion of ...

height, heighth

The proper spelling, of course, is height. Yet because many people improperly pronounce the word with an ending ‑th, you’ll sometimes see the word heighth. In the Richm...

heinous - correct spelling

heinous - adjective
Example: The heinous crime against the child brought cries for legal reform....

heinous - vocabulary

adjective
Odious, hateful, totally reprehensible. If you commit a big crime then you are crazy, and the more heinous the crime the crazier you must be. Therefore you are not responsible...

heir - correct spelling

heir - noun
Example: As the sole heir to the fortune, the young son assumed control of the company....

helping verb

A helping verb is an auxiliary verb.For a brief discussion, see auxiliary verb
.For a thorough discussion, consult the section on Verbs in Parts of Speech on Grammar.com. ...

hemorrhage - correct spelling

hemorrhage - noun and verb
Example: The sudden hemorrhage surprised the surgeons. noun...

here - correct spelling

here - adverb, noun, and adjective
Not hear
.Example: Please put your drink ...

heroes - correct spelling

heroes - noun (plural of the noun hero)  Example: His heroes motivated him to excel....

heroine - correct spelling

heroine - noun
Example: The heroine of the movie rescued the small children....

hesitancy - correct spelling

hesitancy - noun
Example: Without any hesitancy, the father jumped in front of the car to save his children....

hideous - correct spelling

hideous - adjective
Example: His hideous behavior ensured his isolation from the town....

himself - correct spelling

himself - reflexive pronoun and intensive pronoun
Not hisself.Example: He hurt himsel...

hindrance - correct spelling

hindrance - noun
Example: He viewed the project as a hindrance that would waste corporate resources. ...

Historic vs. Historical

The words historical and historic were synonymous t...

historical, historic

There are significant differences between these two words, and savvy writers should know them.The word historic refers to something that is historically significant. A building might be historic...

Hoard vs. Horde

Grandfather has a hoard of old gold coins which he like to brag about to a horde of people. ...

hoarse - correct spelling

hoarse - adjective
Example: The speaker’s hoarse voice caused him to forget his well-rehearsed lines....

holiday - correct spelling

holiday - noun
Example: The young couple enjoyed their holiday at the beach....

homage

Pronounce this word with a strong h. To pronounce it ah-mage reveals a speaker’s lack of knowledge....

homepage - correct spelling

homepage - noun
Here’s a usage note from Dictionary.com
. The transition from World Wide Web site to Web site to ...

homogeneous - vocabulary

adjective
Composed of elements or parts of the same kind; essentially alike. Israel's new deputy prime minister on Sunday called for a near-total separation between Arabs and Jews in the Holy Land, spar...

Homogenous vs. Homogeneous

If you haven’t yet figured out what’s different in both the words, it is just the extra ‘e’. Yet, there is no similarity in the meaning of homogenous and homogeneous.In this Grammar.com article, let us understand some impo...

homograph

The following discussion from The Columbia Guide to Standard American English (1993) aptly describes homographs, homonyms, and homophones: Homographs are words spelled alike but with different meanings and usually with differ...

homonym

 See homograph
....

Homonyms vs. Homophones vs. Homographs

Homonyms vs. Homophones vs. HomographsThe most frequently confused words in English are used wrongly mainly bec...

homophone

 See homograph
....

Homophones

The most common example is the colour “red” and the past tense of the verb “read” which is also pronounced as “red” bu...

Honor vs. Honour

Is someone close to you getting married and you need to print out the wedding card? Are you confused about the phrase Maid of Honor and wondering if it’s Maid of Honour? The difference in the spellings of honor and honour...

hoodwink - vocabulary

verb
To deceive, trick, cheat, swindle. British spy chiefs have grave doubts that Iran has mothballed its nuclear weapons programme, as a US intelligence report claimed last week, and believe the CIA has bee...

Hooves vs. Hoofs

Hooves vs. HoofsPlural is not a very difficult notion in English, and rules that apply in order to form plural ...

hopeless - correct spelling

hopeless - adjective
Example: The politician now faces a hopeless situation....

hoping - correct spelling

hoping - verb (present participle of the verb hope)  Example: He is hoping to enter medical school ...

horrific - correct spelling

horrific - adjective
Example: He tried to rectify the horrific conditions in the mining industry....

hors d'oeuvre - correct spelling

hors d'oeuvre - noun (plural hors d'oeuvres)  Example: He piled his plate with hors d'oeuvres at...

hospital - correct spelling

hospital - noun
Note: Writers in England usually omit any article before the noun hospital. They would write, “She went to hospital.”Example: After the acci...

How Many Words Does an Average Person Know?

According to thelinguist.com, a research done on vocabulary size and auditory syllable recognition am...

How to Avoid Grammar Mistakes in Your Writing?

The truth is, it is nearly impossible to write a 3000-word essay that is completely free of grammar and spelling errors. However, there is a great chance that you can minimize the errors so much that the reader will not notice the small issue...

How to form correct sentences – basic grammar

Let us say the verb is “go”. The second form is “went”. The third form is “gone”. ...

How to form embedded questions?

...

How to Improve Your English

Tips to improve English Both spoken and written English are integral skills for complete command over the language. Here we give you some important and sure-shot tips that will help you improve both y...

How to Stay Motivated to Finish a Book

How to start writing a book? How to stay motivated while writing a book? How to stay motivated to finish something that can turn into a long and complicated process? ...

How To Write An Amazing Blog Post

Picture a cheese sandwich — a truly terrible one. What does it look like? If you’re anything like me, you’re thinking of something like a single square of processed cheese (I see it curling and brownin...

however

Mr. Strunk and Mr. White in The Elements of Style urge writers to avoid starting a sentence with “However.” It’s not a grammatical mistake to start a sentence with However. It’s just that g...

humorous - correct spelling

humorous - adjective
Example: The humorous play delighted the audience....

Humour vs. Humor

Humor me! Or, Humour me? This amusing word has two alternative spellings which are most widely used in the English language and guess what? Both of them are correct. Humor without the ...

hurried - correct spelling

hurried - adjective and verb (past tense and past participle of the verb hurry)  Example: The ...

hurrying - correct spelling

hurrying - verb (present participle of the verb hurry)  Example: She will be hurrying over to our h...

hygiene - correct spelling

hygiene - noun
Example: His personal hygiene left a lot to be desired....

Hyper vs. Hypo

Content about Hyper vs. Hypo has been temporarily removed......

Hyphen

Punctuation is the basic element of English grammar and without it a sentence is not only incomplete but als...

Hyphens and Compound Adjectives

Introduction to the Complicated Topic of Hyphenating Phrasal AdjectivesSome general observations should help you understand the principles behind the rule on hyphenating compound adjectives and therefore increase the likeliho...

Hyphens and Compound Nouns

Most Not HyphenatedMost compound nouns are not hyphenated: master builder fellow employee attorney general Complete WordsOthers have migrated and be...

Hyphens and Compound Words

IntroductionIn chapter 3 of the eBook Understanding the Parts of Speech, you’ll learn about compound adjectives, those multiword, often made-up ...

hypocrisy - correct spelling

hypocrisy - noun
Example: The hypocrisy of the preacher became evident to all when the scandal broke....

hypocrite - correct spelling

hypocrite - noun
Example: The hypocrite gave speeches about morality right before he started accepting bribes....

Discuss these grammar articles with the community:

0 Comments


    We need you!

    Help us build the largest grammar knowledge base and articles collection on the web!


    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Check your text and writing for style, spelling and grammar problems everywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Check your text and writing for style, spelling and grammar problems everywhere on the web!

    Browse Grammar.com

    Free Writing Tool:

    Instant
    Grammar Checker

    Improve your grammar, vocabulary, and writing -- and it's FREE!


    Improve your writing now:

    Download Grammar eBooks

    It’s now more important than ever to develop a powerful writing style. After all, most communication takes place in reports, emails, and instant messages.