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Won’t vs. Wouldn’t

Won’tWon’t is a modal verb. It is the short form (contraction) for ‘will not’. It is the negative of the word ‘will’. It is used to talk about future tense. It is always used with an apostrophe (‘).Examples:I will not go to college toda...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Warrant vs. Justify

WarrantWarrant is a notification, warning or advice to someone. It can also be used to caution someone against a potential danger. Warrant is usually used for mentioning things (not people). For example, if something warrants an action, then that act...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

In Year vs. On Year

in (the/this) <year>We use the preposition ‘in’ to indicate something that’s inside. In the context of time, ‘in’ is used for long durations of time. For example, a month, week or year. Usually, we specify the year when we use ‘in...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Wedding vs Marriage

Wedding Wedding is the name given for the rituals, events and ceremonies that take place when two people take vows to live together for rest of their life. It is an indication of social acceptance of the relationship. Wedding is used to indicate the ...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Story vs. Storey

Story An absolutely common word, story is used by everyone to describe events that are real or imaginary, usually told for entertainment. Story can be short or long and can describe past, present, or possible future events. Story is a noun, and its p...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

Subjective Vs Subjunctive

Subjective Subjective is an adjective that means a report or statement submitted based on a person’s individual ideas and opinions. Subjective statements are usually lengthy and represent personal opinions rather than facts. Subjective ideas and st...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

Felicitate vs Facilitate

Felicitate To felicitate someone means to congratulate someone, give them respect. The word originated from the Latin word ‘felix’ meaning happy which was translate to late Latin ‘felicitare’ meaning pronounce as happy or fortunate. It is pro...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

Destruction Vs Distraction

Destruction The noun destruction means to ruin or demolish something. It can be a car, a person’s career, a house etc. Destruction is used to indicate some mishap that has occurred on a large scale. The verb for destruction is destroy which is the ...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

Override vs Overwrite

Override Override means to add to or enhance something apart from its existing behaviour. It is used very commonly in programming languages. For example, you have generic procedures and rules that all the employees of your company should follow, but ...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

Future vs Feature

Future Perhaps, we use the word ‘future’ everyday to refer to what is going to happen next. Future is a time after the present (now). In English (and other languages), future is a verb tense that indicates a time which is yet to come. Future is u...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

Confirm Vs Conform

Confirm The more common of the two words, confirm is used to establish something as true using proof or facts. For example, to confirm a theory is to prove it using some facts, to confirm a plan is to make it 100%, to confirm a decision is to accept ...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

pro-drop

The property of a language in which a sentence does not require an overt subject. Spanish is a pro-drop language: it is perfectly normal in Spanish to say No canto bien (Don't sing well) rather than Yo no canto bien (I don't sing well). English is no...

added by Robert_Haigh
5 months ago

clipping

Clipping is a type of word-formation in which a short piece is extracted from a longer word and given the same meaning. Examples include bra from brassiere, gym from gymnasium, flu from influenza, cello from violoncello, phone from telephone and bus ...

added by Robert_Haigh
5 months ago

Likeable vs. likable

Both spellings are acceptable in both British and American English, but British English strongly prefers likeable, while American English slightly prefers likable....

added by Robert_Haigh
5 months ago

Copyright vs Copywrite

Copyright Copyright is a noun, which means exclusive legal rights of something – a work of art, music, document, poem, film name or any original work. This object or piece of work cannot be copied or used without permission from the owner or paymen...

added by ramyashankar
5 months ago

dissent vs. dissension

These words are not equivalent. Dissent is disagreement with an opinion, especially with a majority view. Dissension is serious and persistent disagreement among a group of people, especially ill-natured disagreement which leads to quarrels. ...

added by Robert_Haigh
5 months ago

dissatisfied vs. unsatisfied

When you are dissatisfied you are disappointed, unhappy or frustrated. When you are unsatisfied, you feel that you need more of something. Only a person can be dissatisfied, while an abstract thing like hunger or a demand for goods can be unsatisfied...

added by Robert_Haigh
5 months ago

waste vs. wastage

The word wastage is not a fancy equivalent for waste. Waste is failure to use something which could easily be used. But wastage is loss resulting from unavoidable natural causes, such as evaporation....

added by Robert_Haigh
5 months ago

obsolescent vs. obsolete

Something which is obsolescent is dropping out of use but is not yet entirely gone, while something which is obsolete has completely disappeared from use....

added by Robert_Haigh
5 months ago

childish vs. childlike

Though childish is occasionally used neutrally to mean 'appropriate to a child', as in my childish efforts at drawing, it is much more commonly encountered as a term of contempt applied to an adult, as in the familiar  Don't be so childish! ...

added by Robert_Haigh
6 months ago

ketchup, catchup, catsup

In British English, ketchup is the only form in use. American English still uses all three forms, though ketchup is the recommended form for American writers....

added by Robert_Haigh
6 months ago

learnèd word

A word taken from a classical language. For example, instead of breakable, English often uses the Latin word fragile; instead of dog we sometimes use the Latin word canine; instead of saying that a disease is catching, we often prefer the L...

added by Robert_Haigh
6 months ago

diachronic

Pertaining to the time element in language; involving change in a language over time. A diachronic approach to the study of a language is the study of its development over a period of time....

added by Robert_Haigh
6 months ago

tag question

A brief question which is tacked on to the end of a statement. English uses two different kinds of tag question, both of somewhat complex formation. Consider the statement Astrid is Norwegian. One kind of tag question extends this statement so as to ...

added by Robert_Haigh
6 months ago

minor sentence

Any piece of speech or writing which does not have the form of a complete sentence but which is normal in context. Examples: "Any news?"; "No smoking!"; "Hello."; "As if I would know."; "Wow!...

added by Robert_Haigh
6 months ago

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