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Or vs Orwith

"Or" and "orwith" may seem very similar at first; consider these two sentences: "The steak comes with beans or rice." and "The steak comes with beans orwith rice.".They mean the same thing... right? No.An important part of "orwith"'s identity is bein...

added by calin_baenen
1 year ago

Meat vs. Meet

"Meat" is a noun that refers to the flesh of animals that is typically used as food. Examples of meat include beef, pork, chicken, and fish. "Meet", on the other hand, is a verb that means to come together or be introduced to someone for the first t...

added by courtneye
1 year ago

Cereal vs. Serial

"Cereal" refers to a type of food that is made from grains and is typically eaten with milk for breakfast. Examples of cereal include oats, cornflakes, and Rice Krispies. On the other hand, "serial" refers to something that is composed of or present...

added by courtneye
1 year ago

Is "thanks a lot" sarcastic?

When used sincerely, "thanks a lot" is a common way to express gratitude or appreciation. For example, if someone helps you with a task or does something kind for you, you might say "thanks a lot" to show your appreciation. However, in certain conte...

added by courtneye
1 year ago

Also vs. As well

"Also" is a more common word and can be used in various positions within a sentence. It is used to add emphasis to a statement or to show that something is included in addition to what has already been mentioned. For example, "I'm allergic to cats. A...

added by courtneye
1 year ago

Should I use "oldest friend" or "longest friend"?

"Oldest friend" typically refers to a friend that a person has known for the most amount of time, regardless of how often they may see or communicate with each other. It emphasizes the length of the friendship, and suggests a deeper connection or his...

added by courtneye
1 year ago

Born in vs. Born at

In English, prepositions such as "at" and "in" are used to convey different types of information about time and place. When referring to a person's birthplace, "born at" and "born in" are two common expressions used to convey information about the sp...

added by courtneye
1 year ago

Chiasmus and Antimetabole

Chiasmus Chiasmus (pronounced ki-AZ-muss) is an ancient literary device, as old as ancient Greek verse and Hebrew scripture, which when used appropriately can be an effective way to transform your writing. It is basically, a rhetorical figure of spe...

added by JokerGem
1 year ago

A Comprehensive Guide to the World's Most Difficult Grammars

Top 5 languages with the most difficult grammar Learning a new language may be thrilling and challenging at the same time. While learning certain languages is very simple, learning others takes more time and effort. The top five languages with the m...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Correcting Spoken Grammar Errors

Most of us will make the occasional mistake when speaking, whether we confuse an irregular verb tense or pronounce a word incorrectly. Whether English is our mother tongue or a second language, we might feel a bit embarrassed when our mistakes are ca...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Acronym vs Anacronym

Do you know the difference between the words Acronym vs Anacronym? At first glance, we might be tempted to think that the two words, “an acronym,” mistakenly merged into the one word, “anacronym” – indeed, it appears that way! But, in ...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Personification vs Anthropomorphism

Do you know the difference between Personification vs Anthropomorphism? Personification and anthropomorphism are two kinds of literary devices that are used to give depth and emotion to our descriptions. In this article, Personification vs ...

added by Teril
1 year ago

May vs Might

Most of us use “may” and “might” interchangeably. We often choose one or the other without giving it much thought and both sound right in most situations. But there are contexts and nuances to take into consideration. In this articl...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Irony vs Sarcasm

Irony and Sarcasm are both language devices that are used to shape meaning.Meaning can be expressed in complex ways. We are able to create double meanings; we can say things that we don’t mean, while our meaning hides in that which is unsaid; we ca...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Cognitive Dissonance vs Cognitive Consonance

Cognitive Dissonance and Cognitive Consonance are the opposite of each other, but they certainly live side by side: if you pay attention to your mental state, you might discover that you are feeling either one or the other. • How do you deal w...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Dog Language: Words from A Dog’s World

If you are thinking about getting a dog, or if you already have a dog, it is important to know some of the vocabulary in the dog world. In this article, you will find:• Words that describe the life of a dog• Words that describe the jobs that...

added by Teril
1 year ago

The Use of Repetition as a Rhetorical Device: Anaphora, Epistrophe, and Symploce

Do you know these three words: Anaphora, Epistrophe, and Symploce?In this article, The Use of Repetition as a Rhetorical Device, I will:1. Discuss the use of repetition as a rhetorical device. 2. Define Anaphora, Epistrophe, and Symploce - ...

added by Teril
1 year ago

People Is” vs “People Are”

Let’s begin with the most simplistic statement: “People are…” is correct. “People is…” is not correct.Well, wait a minute!• Does that mean that the word “people” is a singular noun or a plural noun? • And how is it use...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Coffeehouse Language: Vocabulary for a Great Cup of Coffee

Did you know that coffee grows on trees?The goal of this article is to clarify and organize some basic concepts relating to coffee and its consumption.We will first describe the process used to bring coffee to you, from tree to table. We will th...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Compared To vs Compared With: What is the Difference?

The phrases “compared to” and “compared with” are used interchangeably and are usually assumed to have the same meaning. But do they?  In this article, we will take a closer look at the verb “compare” when it is coupled with the...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Backup and Back up? What’s the Difference?

We all use the word Backup. Or is it Back Up? ·       Are they identical, both equally right and acceptable? ·       Is one spelled correctly and the other simply wrong? ·       Do they...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Common Yiddish Idioms in English

Did you know that the word “bagel” is taken from Yiddish?How about the origin of the word “glitch”? Did you ever use the word “schlep”?  Also from Yiddish!Continue reading to learn about Common Yiddish Idioms in English:&nb...

added by Teril
1 year ago

6 American Football Expressions

Many expressions from American football have made their way into our everyday speech and we use football expressions without even realizing that we are echoing the language of the football stadium.This article defines 6 American Football Expressions,...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Idolatry vs. Idiolatry vs. Ideology: What’s the Difference

Idolatry, idiolatry, ideology. These three words look somewhat the same. They sound somewhat the same. Do you think that these three words are similar in their meaning, as well?Continue reading to learn the definition of these words and how...

added by Teril
1 year ago

Fake News: How to Check Your Facts

Fake news is essentially false information that is presented as true and appears at first glance to be from a trustworthy source. But don’t believe all that you read.In this article, we will define the term fake news and discuss the importance...

added by Teril
1 year ago

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    Quiz

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    Choose the sentence with correct use of the present perfect continuous tense:
    A He is living in this city since 2010.
    B We have visited the museum last week.
    C I have played the piano yesterday.
    D She has been studying for hours.