Editorial »

Recently Added Articles

Our vibrant community of passionate editors is making sure we're up to date with the latest and greatest grammar tips, articles and tutorials.

Font size:

spurious - vocabulary

adjectiveNot genuine, authentic, or true; not from the pretended or proper source; counterfeit. Jargon is the verbal sleight of hand that makes the old hat seem newly fashionable; it gives an air of novelty and specious profundity to ideas that, if s...

added by edgood
3 years ago

Commas and Introductory Clauses or Phrases

You should put a comma after an introductory clause or phrase: Though the agency had studied this issue before, it went ahead with another study. (Introductory dependent clause.)If I were you, I would research the case thoroughly. (Introductory depen...

added by edgood
3 years ago

because, as, since, for

See as, because, since, for....

added by edgood
3 years ago

altogether - correct spelling

altogether adverbNote: The two-word expression all together means “in a group.” The one-word expression altogether means “wholly, entirely, completely.” Though indistinguishable in speech, these expressions should appear properly spelled in w...

added by edgood
3 years ago

definitive - correct spelling

definitive adjectiveNote: The adjectives definite and definitive both describe something precisely defined or explicitly set forth. The word definitive, however, refers to something serving as a standard. The definitive decision of the court is a fin...

added by edgood
3 years ago

incidental - correct spelling

incidental - adjective and noun (often plural)  Example: Though the contact was incidental, he was arrested for battery. adjectiveExample: We paid for the office supplies and other incidentals. noun...

added by edgood
3 years ago

pleasant - correct spelling

pleasant - adjective  Example: The pleasant breeze wafted through the cabin....

added by edgood
3 years ago

though - correct spelling

subordinating conjunction and adverbExample: He still disputes the point, though he knows he’s wrong. subordinating conjunctionExample: We can expect some rain, though. adverb...

added by edgood
3 years ago

icon, iconoclast - vocabulary

nounIcon: An image, picture, likeness, or representation; an enduring symbol; a person who is the object of devotion or attention. In the computer world, a graphical image or symbol on a screen that represents an underlying file or program. “Grille...

added by edgood
3 years ago

denouement - vocabulary

denouement - noun The final resolution of a plot or play; also used to describe the ultimate outcome of a doubtful series of events. A young professor I watched in action at one of our large eastern colleges used to stand with his back to the class a...

added by edgood
3 years ago

Adverbial Phrases Between Subject and Verb

Put preceding and trailing commas around any adverbial phrase coming between the subject and the verb: Ms. Smith, after commenting on the evidence, ruled in favor of the supervisor. The court, in a manner surprising to all, excluded the press from th...

added by edgood
3 years ago

besides, beside

As prepositions, these two are commonly interchanged, but their meanings do differ, according to traditionalists.Besides means “other than” or “in addition to” while beside means “next to.”If you say there is no one beside you on the bus,...

added by edgood
3 years ago

always - correct spelling

always adverbExample: He always works on weekends....

added by edgood
3 years ago

delicious - correct spelling

delicious adjectiveExample: The child munched on the delicious apple....

added by edgood
3 years ago

incidentally - correct spelling

incidentally - adverb  Not incidently.Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that discussion.Example: They met incidentally at the convention a year before their marriage....

added by edgood
3 years ago

please - correct spelling

please - adverb and verb  Example: Would you please turn off the radio. adverbExample: He wanted to please the public. verb...

added by edgood
3 years ago

thought - correct spelling

noun and verb (past tense and past participle of the verb think)Example: He had a thought about how to fix the situation. nounExample: He thought about the trouble he had caused. verb...

added by edgood
3 years ago

idiosyncrasy - vocabulary

nounA characteristic, mental quality, or habit peculiar to an individual or group. “What’s to be done? Here’s the cottage, taking one time with another, will produce, say seventy pounds a year. I think we may safely put it down at that. Well!...

added by edgood
3 years ago

venerable - vocabulary

adjectiveMeriting or commanding high esteem because of age or high dignity; impressive or interesting because of great age; hallowed or historic. Heaven and earth are grand; father and mother are venerable. —Chinese Proverb...

added by edgood
3 years ago

Adjectival Clauses and Phrases

Restrictive vs. NonrestrictiveIf the adjectival clause or phrase is nonrestrictive, put commas around it. If the clause or phrase is restrictive, do not put commas around it. See the discussion of that vs. which in chapter 4 of the eBook Developing a...

added by edgood
3 years ago

breath, breathe

Breathe (pronounced with a long “e”) is a verb, and breath (short “e”) is a noun.Example: He tried to take a breath but was unable to breathe....

added by edgood
3 years ago

amateur - correct spelling

amateur noun and adjectiveExample: As an amateur, Tiger Woods played at Augusta National. nounExample: He excelled as an amateur golfer. adjective...

added by edgood
3 years ago

dependent - correct spelling

dependent adjective and nounExample: Our success is dependent on our willingness to work. adjectiveExample: He learned all about the dependent clause. adjectiveExample: She claimed one dependent on her tax returns. noun...

added by edgood
3 years ago

increase - correct spelling

increase - verb and noun  Example: These additional sales will increase the company’s profits. verbExample: The city saw a disturbing increase in violent crime. noun...

added by edgood
3 years ago

pleasure - correct spelling

pleasure - noun and verb  Example: He took great pleasure in handing out the awards. nounExample: The flowers will pleasure the hospital patient. verb...

added by edgood
3 years ago

We need you!

Help us build the largest grammar knowledge base and articles collection on the web!

Improve your writing now:

Download Grammar eBooks

It’s now more important than ever to develop a powerful writing style. After all, most communication takes place in reports, emails, and instant messages.