Grammar Tips & Articles »

imperative mood

This Grammar.com article is about imperative mood — enjoy your reading!


48 sec read
3,309 Views
  Ed Good  —  Grammar Tips
Font size:

The mood of verbs shows how the speaker regards the utterance. The speaker might regard the utterance as a statement: that's the indicative mood. The speaker might ask a question: that's the interrogative mood. The speaker might issue a command: that's the imperative mood. Or the speaker might state a possibility, hope, wish, or hypothetical: that's the subjunctive mood.

You form the imperative mood by using the second-person conjugation and ordinarily leaving out the subject. The subject is the implied you. Sometimes, the speaker includes the subject, either at the beginning of the sentence or postponed to the end. For emphasis, the speaker can even put a comma after the subject.

Here are some examples of the imperative mood. Notice in the “Frances” examples thatFrancesis the third person. But the imperative mood is formed by using the second-person form of the verb:

  • Close the window.
  • Come here!
  • You come here.
  • Frances, write the report.
  • Write the report, Frances.
Rate this article:

Have a discussion about this article with the community:

0 Comments

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this article to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "imperative mood." Grammar.com. STANDS4 LLC, 2024. Web. 13 Apr. 2024. <https://www.grammar.com/imperative-mood>.

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Check your text and writing for style, spelling and grammar problems everywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Check your text and writing for style, spelling and grammar problems everywhere on the web!

    Browse Grammar.com

    Free Writing Tool:

    Instant
    Grammar Checker

    Improve your grammar, vocabulary, and writing -- and it's FREE!


    Quiz

    Are you a grammar master?

    »
    Choose the sentence with correct use of the coordinating conjunction:
    A He is tired so he keeps working.
    B She likes both chocolate and vanilla ice cream.
    C She is tall and her brother is short.
    D I neither like apples nor oranges.

    Improve your writing now:

    Download Grammar eBooks

    It’s now more important than ever to develop a powerful writing style. After all, most communication takes place in reports, emails, and instant messages.