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mitigate, militate

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  Ed Good  —  Grammar Tips
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The word mitigate means “to make less severe or less intense.” The word militate means “to influence strongly.” The word militate is intransitive and is usually accompanied by the preposition against. The word mitigate, on the other hand, is transitive and may affix itself directly to a noun.

Example: His astute knowledge of the markets mitigated the risk and militated against failure.

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