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Adviser vs. Advisor
Are you a student who needs academic guidance about your future studies? You will be advised to visit the academic adviser. Or is it adadvisor? Does it confuse you which advisor to go when you need c…
advisor - correct spelling
advisor noun
Example: Take this matter to your advisor.
Frequently Misspelled Words
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Moat vs. Mote
There are millions of tiny dust motes in the air. He fell in the moat around the castle. Consider the two sentences above and try to figure out what moat and mote mean from their respective sentences…
counsel - correct spelling
counsel noun and verb
Not council.
Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses council and counsel. Click here for that discussion.
Example: Please hee…
4. What Are the Comparative and Superlative Forms?
Recall in the section on adjectives that we can show various degrees of the descriptive qualities of adjectives: hot plate (positive) hotter plate (comparative)
Counsel vs. Council
The pronunciations of “counsel” and “council” are almost identical, and this is the reason why they are so often confused. But despite their similarity, they have distinct meanings and should be used…
Tense

Grammar of a language is composed of many components that’s together are responsible for the formation of that language. Likewise, English grammar is also a very vast and diverse term which consi…
Lay vs. Lie
The words lay and lie are one the most confusing pair of words, which are often mistaken for each other. The words have different spellings, meanings and pronunciations but their very close spellings…
What Nouns Do
What do nouns do in our language? It’s crucial that you know, for you cannot begin to engage in any kind of grammatical analysis without knowing the roles of all eight parts of speech.
The main ro…
Base vs. Bass
Even though they are correctly pronounced differently, the fact that “base” and “bass” have quite similar spellings often determines some English users to pronounce them almost identically and, conse…
Desert vs. Dessert
I would love to enjoy a cold dessert in a desert. Dessert and desert is the most common pair of words that is confused with each other very often. Both the words rhyme with each other and are very si…
Education vs. Experience: Where to Place What, Where on Your Resume
When it comes to deciding if you should place education before experience or vice versa on your resume, the truth of the matter is that it depends on a number of considerations. Regardless of how you…
Frequently Asked Questions
A lot or Alot?
A or An?
Accept or Except?
Acronyms and Initialisms?
Active or Passive Verbs?
Affect or Effect?
All Ready or Already?
Allusion or Illusion?
Among or Am…
Improve Your Writing & Credibility as a Writer with Proper Grammar
Since we all age and forget the basic grammar rules we learn in grade school, I have provided a short guide on grammar for your review. Also, test yourself when you are giving birth to a masterpiece …
Perfect Tenses - How to Form
In addition to the three main tenses of present, past, and future, the English language allows us to make three statements about accomplished facts. We use one of the three perfect tenses to show an …
Present Perfect Tense

Are you aware of the term tense? It is a grammatical concept of English language that depends on the verb and decides the time of the action taking place.In today’s article, I will throw light up…
Future Perfect Tense
Tenses are the main component of English grammar which contribute to the main structure and formation of the language. Tenses make the language sensible and comprehendible for the writers, speakers a…
Future Indefinite Tense
Tenses hold the pillars of English grammar and keep it standing. Without tenses, English or any other language for that matter cannot exist or make sense. While learning English, it is very important…
Future Perfect Continuous Tense
Tenses refer to the part of English grammar that contribute to the formation and structure of each and every sentence. It actually refers to the verb and the time of it occurrence in a specific sente…
Future Continuous Tense
Early learners of English language come across tenses and have to master them before moving further with the learning process. Tenses play a very important role in language and hold its grammar and l…
vernacular - vocabulary
adjective
Concerning language, indigenous or native, as opposed to learned or literary; using plain, ordinary language; also pertaining to a style of architecture employing techniques, decorative …
Rain vs. Reign vs. Rein
Some words exist in English language which have same sounds but different meanings. Rain, reign and rein also fall in this category. These three words have almost similar pronunciations but their mea…
Neighbor vs. Neighbour
New neighbors just moved in the big white house. Consider this sentence for a moment. Does the word neighbors make you think again that maybe the spellings of neighbor aren’t really like these? Maybe…
Gaol vs. Jail
As language evolves, some words drop out of common usage or change with the language. This could result in spelling changes, usage changes, or replacement with an entirely new word. This is a frequen…
Vacate vs. Evacuate
Evacuate Evacuate (verb) is a stronger term which means emptying a space because of some emergency for safety purpose. Commonly, this word is used when there is a problem and a large number of people…
Case of Pronouns - The Rule
In formal settings, you must follow the rules governing the case of pronouns.
If your sentence calls for the subjective case, you must use I, you, he, she, it, we, you, they (see …
Chart Showing Various Uses
Learn the various ways the word there can act in our language. Word Function Example there pronoun taking the place of ensuing noun There is a …
Chapter 12 - “Bring” vs. “Take"
“Bring along this advice when you go to work.”
I wish the writers of the Seinfeld series paid attention to the differences between bring and take. For hundreds of episodes, they r…
Phrasal verbs with back
1. Back up Back up someone – to give support to someone. Examples – ·         We had to back her up till her room as she was very tired. ·   …
Present Indefinite Tense

Tense is a common word which means stressed but did you know that tense also has grammatical significance in English language. Tense is one of the main component of English language and the gramm…
Present Continuous Tense

Tenses are a vital component of English language and grammar or the whole language is standing on the pillars of tenses.In today’s article, I will be discussing about what tense is, what are its …
Present Perfect Continuous Tense

Tense does not only mean stress or tightness but tense also has a grammatical meaning and role in English language. It is one of the main components of English grammar and decides the existence o…
Past Indefinite Tense

The term tenses is used in English language to describe the occurrence of verb. Tense also has other meanings but grammatically speaking, this is the only meaning of the term.In today’s article, …
Past Continuous Tense

Most of us English learners are aware of the term tenses and what it means in the grammatical language. What most of us don’t understand is the importance tense has in the formation of the langua…
Past Perfect Continuous Tense
Beginners of English language sometimes face difficulties in understanding and applying the correct tenses while writing and speaking. One little mistake in tense of a sentence can lead to a big chan…
Past Perfect Tense
Tenses hold vital importance in English grammar and language. The term tense has literal meaning of stress or tension but in English grammar it depicts something entirely different.Today I will discu…
Lonely vs. Alone
Everyone knows what "lonely" and "alone" both refer to: a single person, not surrounded by people. It's about the state of being only "one". But the fact that they do refer to the same concept is als…
Cavalry vs. Calvary
The similarity between the spellings of “cavalry” and “calvary” can easily confuse you, especially because none of these words is frequently used nowadays, so the contexts aren’t very helpful in iden…
Wedding vs Marriage
Wedding Wedding is the name given for the rituals, events and ceremonies that take place when two people take vows to live together for rest of their life. It is an indication of social acceptance of…
Check out vs Checkout
Check out Check out is a phrasal verb of the word check, which has 2 meanings: to look at someone/somethingto sign for something (like a will) You can also add a noun or pronoun between the words, li…
Arrival va. Arrive
The act of getting to a place.Someone or something that has gotten to a place.
To reach a place.To come.
In vs. Inn
So in order to give you a better idea of how common "in" is and how often it is used with multiple and distinct meanings in English phrases, let's explain both "in" and "inn" with relevant examples! …
endemic - vocabulary
adjective
Characteristic of or natural to a particular place or people; indigenous; native; belonging exclusively to or confined to particular place. Dr. Hooker has recently shown that in the S.E.…
prescience, prescient - vocabulary
noun
Prescience: knowledge of events before they take place.
adjective
Prescient: perceiving significance of events before they take place.
Note:…
quiescent - vocabulary
adjective
Being quiet, at rest, still, motionless, as in quiescent thoughts. There is a brief time for sex, and a long time when sex is out of place. But when it is out of place as an activity the…
Cheap vs. Cheep
Cheap vs. Cheep Cheap and cheep both sound same but their meanings are entirely different. The words with similar sounds but different meaning and spellings are known as homophones. Homophones are mi…
Altogether vs. All together
It was an altogether decision to agree to all terms all together.If the above sentence has confused you to the core and you cannot decide if it’s right or wrong, worry not. We are here to help you wi…
Biannual vs. Biennial
Biannual and biennial are treated as if they are interchangeable or they mean the same. Some people who know the difference but still get confuse about which is which. Consider the two sentences belo…
Peddle vs. Pedal
English spelling is full of apparent idiosyncrasies – native speakers and learners alike grapple with doubling consonants, how to form plurals, ‘i’ before ‘e’ except after ‘c’’, and have to dodge ump…
Cash vs. Cache
English is a complicated language. There are some words in English that sound exactly the same but have different spellings and meanings. These words are called homophones and they are a cause of con…
Colonize vs. Colonise
The Greeks colonized Sicily and southern Italy. Our organization is seeking to protect the rights of the newly colonised people. Which of the above two sentences is correct? What are the right spelli…
Prepositions – At vs. In vs. On
In, at and on are commonly used prepositions and are used in different situations – be it telling adate, or time, or about a place and so on. Let’s discuss these prepositions and their uses in detail…
Auxiliary verbs
BE ‘To be’ means to exist. ‘Be’ can be used in many ways. ·    To form continuous tenses – present, past, future – be takes the form of am, is, are, was, were, will be – o  …
Oldest vs. Eldest
Eldest is used while referring to age with respect to seniority. It is used to refer to related members of family. The word has been derived from old English ieldest and can also be said as ‘most gro…
Perfect vs. Prefect
Perfect (adjective) means something that is flawless or complete. ·         No one is perfect in this world. ·      &nbs…
File vs. Fill
Fill Fill as we know is to occupy a space with something. For example, fill the bottle with water. Filling can be used in more than one way. For one, it is the continuous form of fill. For example, …
A General Summary of Nouns
At this stage, we are still just exploring the eight parts of speech. The first is the noun. Above, we learned that nouns serve to name things, people, places, ideas, feelings, and other abstractions…
Verb "To Be"
To Be or Not To Be
The eBook Developing a Powerful Writing Style thoroughly discusses the problem of overusing the verb to be. We urge you to read it. When you do, notice that the…
Infinitive - The "to" Verb
Academic tomes might go on for pages defining the meaning of the infinitive form of a verb. I, on the other hand, have developed a definition requiring only a single sentence:
The infiniti…
Verb Conjugation
Verb Conjugation in English
Every verb in the English language has two states or dimensions—two realms, if you will. In the infinitive state, the verb reveals only the activity de…
Split Infinitives
Perhaps no “rule” of grammar sparks more controversy than the “rule” against splitting infinitives. Leading experts on the English language, however, point out that the split infinitive appeared in t…
3 Basic Grammar Rules for Academic Writing
Rule #1. Use Proper PunctuationWe assume that you already know the basic rule that you should write complete sentences that have subjects and verbs, and ensure that you start each new sentence with a…
Relive vs. Relieve
Relive Relive is to live an experience or memory again (re+live). Relive can be written with the ‘-‘ symbol as re-live as well. It is a verb that became more popular in its usage during 2000’s. When …
Favorite vs. Favourite
While reading or writing, do you ever pause upon favorite and wonder what the correct spellings of it are? His favorite restaurant is that small place in the suburbs. Or should it be like: His favour…
Employ vs. Deploy
Employ Employ is a verb that comes from the middle English imploy and means to give work to someone and pay for it. For example, a company employs people based on their skills. Some common synonyms o…
Beside vs. Besides
Beside Beside is a preposition of place. It means ‘next to’. The word has originated from the old English adverb ‘be sidan’ meaning by the side. Examples – ·    My house is beside Tom’…
Conditional Sentences
If you are paving your path to learn better English or trying to improve your grammar you must have come across the conditional sentences. You might get an idea of what a conditional sentence is by j…
Adjective vs. Adverb
We all learned about the different parts of speech in high school and most of us can easily distinguish between a noun and a verb. But when it comes to an adjective and an adverb, it is a little hard…
Auxiliary Verb
Verbs are one of the first parts of speech a child learns about in high school. They are the main building blocks of a sentence and English grammar is incomplete about them. We all know that a verb i…
People vs. Peoples vs. Pupils
Person When we refer to a human being, we say a person. For example, a nice person, the last person to attend the conference and so on… When there are many human beings or individuals, we refer to th…
Dangling Modifier
A modifier literally means something or someone that modifies or adjusts something. But when it comes to English language and more specifically English grammar, a modifier is a word or phrase that de…
Grammatical Person
Person is a very common word of English language and anyone with basic English understanding knows and understands what this means. But there are only a handful of people that know what a grammatical…
Participle
We read about the term participle somewhere around in grade 2 or 3 when our English teacher was telling us something about the tenses. Participle is a common term in English grammar and one should kn…
Cognate Object
An object is a part of a sentence that represents the noun on which the action is taking place.Example:Sara don’t like Adam at all.In the above example, Adam is the object as the action is taking pla…
The Most Difficult Words to Spell in English
And, then come those complex words that don’t even enter our tongue, leave alone learning or using them. But why are those words there? • For most English language exams, knowledge of these w…
Among vs. Amongst
Amongst" is obviously formed by adding the suffix "-st" to the preposition "among". But you have probably always seen both of these terms used in the same context, just like they mean the same. Then …
Dairy vs. Diary
Simply inverting the order of two letters in a word can completely change its meaning. This is exactly the situation for "dairy" and "diary", which are two nouns spelled very similarly. This similari…
Illusion vs. Delusion
Illusion" and "delusion" are spelled quite similarly and also used in similar contexts. But can they replace one another and can they be called synonyms right away, or are there some significant diff…
Incidents vs. Incidence
Another pair of words written and pronounced very similarly is represented by "incidents" and "incidence". But, as in most of the cases, it is also wrong to replace one with the other because their m…
Access vs. Excess
Access” and “excess” are often confused due to their spelling similarities. But these words have completely different meanings and must never be used one instead of the other.
We have prepared a c…
Their vs. There
Belonging to or to do with them.
To, in, or at that place.A word used to introduce a sentence in which the verb comes before the subject.That place.
Miss vs. Missing
Miss vs. Missing
An important misunderstanding, in regard to the word "missing", is the false impression that it functions as a noun. That happens because some people tend to associate it with wo…
antecedent
A pronoun takes the place of a noun. When writing, you'll use a pronoun and that pronoun will refer to some noun close by. That noun (the referent) is called the antecedent. The prefix ante might mak…
compound verb
A compound verb is a multiword verb form consisting of one or more auxiliary verbs and a main verb, as in I have seen the movie, She has gone home, We will have decided this issue sometime next week.…
demonstrative pronoun
We have four demonstrative pronouns in the English language: this, that, these, those. The first two are singular, the last two plural. Demonstrative pronouns take the place of a noun, and when you u…
direct object
Action verbs come in two varieties: transitive and intransitive. A transitive verb has the intrinsic ability to attach directly to a noun, and that noun is called the direct object. Thus, in the sent…
interrogative mood
First, understand this: The word mood has nothing to do with frame of mind, as in happy or sad. It actually refers to mode, which is the attribute of a verb suggesting the speaker's attitude toward t…
noun
A noun is a person, place, thing, or idea or emotional state. Nouns are characterized by their ability to form plurals and to take possessive endings. The noun serves a variety of roles in our senten…
noun absolute
The noun absolute is a power structure that belongs in your style. All great writers routinely use noun absolutes. In fact, you won't find a great work of fiction without oodles of noun absolutes. Yo…
noun chain
These days writers write long chains of nouns that befuddle the reader. A noun chain is a string of nouns, some acting as noun modifiers and one finally serving the noun function in the sentence. The…
pronoun
We have seven kinds of pronouns in the English language.
A pronoun is a word that takes the place of a noun. Personal pronouns (words like I, me, my, we, our, us, you, your, he, she, him, his, her…
proper noun
A proper noun names a specific person, place, time period, work of literature or art, and so on. It begins with a capital letter. Examples include: New York City Friday Shakespeare's play Hamlet Fred
almost
Place almost directly before the word it modifies.
The following is incorrect: There was almost a threatening edge to his voice. Instead: There was an almost thre…
besides, beside
As prepositions, these two are commonly interchanged, but their meanings do differ, according to traditionalists.
Besides means “other than” or “in addition to” while besi…
dessert, desert
A dessert is something you eat after dinner.
A desert is a hot place with a lot of sand. Desert can also be used as a verb meaning “to abandon” o…
diary, dairy
A diary is a written record of daily events.
A dairy is a place that produces milk or milk products. Dairy is also used as an adjective to descri…
imply, infer
Both of these words have to do with the communication of ideas through an indirect but logical process. The difference lies in who is making (or attempting to make) the logical connection.
A write…
site, sight, cite
Cite means either “to quote” or “to commend” and is usually a verb. As a noun, cite means “a short citation or reference.”
Site means “a place or…
than, then
Than is a word used only in comparisons (greater than, less than, etc.).
Then is used to place an action in time or a thought in…
who, whom, or whose
The word who is the subjective or nominative case. It acts as a subject of a clause (The runner who won the race) or as a predicate nominative, that is, a pronoun li…
byte - correct spelling
byte
noun
Note: Werner Buchholz coined this term in 1956 when he participated in the early design of the IBM Stretch computer. It mutated from the word bite to avoid any confus…
abstemious - vocabulary
abstemious - adjective A state of self-denial or abstinence, regarding the use (usually overuse) of food or drink. When [Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (121–180)] was eleven years old, he…
beset - vocabulary
beset - verb To attack on all sides, to assail, to harass, as in beset by financial difficulties; to surround or hem in, as in the little town beset on all sides with housing develop…
circumscribe - vocabulary
circumscribe - verb To draw a line around, to encircle, as in to circumscribe a village on a map; to enclose with bounds, to delimit, as in His ambition is circumscribed by his lack …
comport - vocabulary
comport - verb To conduct or behave (oneself), as in He comported himself with dignity; to be in agreement with (usually followed by with), as in Our policy must comport with the pri…
denizen - vocabulary
denizen - noun Inhabitant or resident; one who frequently inhabits a place, as in the denizens of the local pub. A tanned skin is something more than respectable, and perhaps olive is a fitter color …
discomfit - vocabulary
discomfit - verb Discomfit, to confuse, disconcert; to thwart, to frustrate the plans of, to foil. Whether the issue is birth control or global warming or clean air, this administration has already a…
egoism, egotism - vocabulary
egoism, egotism - noun Egoism: a philosophical doctrine that morality has its foundations in self-interest.
Egotism: an excessive preoccupation with self.
eminent, imminent - vocabulary
adjective
Eminent: high in station or rank, prominent, distinguished; prominent; conspicuous. To show the highest in stature, use preeminent (no hyphen).
In law, the power of e…
grizzly, grisly - vocabulary
adjective
Grizzly: grayish; also, as a noun, a large bear.
Grisly: causing a feeling of horror; gruesome; horrible, as in a grisly murder. I often look upon a …
liable, libel - vocabulary
adjective
Liable: legally responsible; subject or susceptible to; likely or apt. Note: Liable is often interchangeable with likely in constructions with a followi…
precedence, precedent, precedential - vocabulary
noun
Precedence: the fact or act of preceding, as in The first patent application receives precedence in Europe; priority in place, time, or rank because of superiority, as in The…
repertory - vocabulary
noun
A place where things are stored or gathered together, a collection; also, a type of theatrical presentation in which the theater group presents several works. Each writer is born with a
resplendent - vocabulary
adjective
Very bright, shining brightly, gleaming, splendid, as in the dancers resplendent in their native costumes. In the luxuriance of a bowl of grapes set out in ritual display, in a bottle of…
solecism - vocabulary
noun
A nonstandard or ungrammatical usage, as in There’s lots of cars on the road.
A solecism can also refer to a social impropriety, especially in British English. “This [feeding fruitcake to …
supplant - vocabulary
verb
To force out another, through strategy or schemes; to take the place of. Socialists propose to supplant the competitive planning of capitalism with a highly centralized plann…
unique - vocabulary
adjective
Being the only one of its kind.
Note: Be careful and refrain from using adverbs to modify unique, such as very unique, the most unique, extremely unique. Unique means…
vicarious - vocabulary
adjective
Suffered, done, received, or exercised in place of another, as in vicarious punishment; serving as a substitute; felt or enjoyed through imagination of experience of others, as in a vica…
Sample Page
This is an example page. It's different from a blog post because it will stay in one place and will show up in your site navigation (in most themes). Most people start with an About page that introdu…
The Awful “Like” Word – Part I
If you have a “like” habit, the time has come: Break it. Many people cannot make it through a single sentence without scores of “I’m like” and “She was like” and “She’s all . . . .” For g…
Cancelled vs. Canceled
A student’s best friend and a party lover’s worst enemy, cancel, has two possible forms of past tense, cancelled/canceled. Consider this: The English class has been cancelled today as the teacher is …
Then vs. Than
The policeman’s strategy was better than the burglar’s so he waited for him to make a move first and then arrested him. Did you notice than and then in the above sentence? Do you sometimes get confus…
Admit vs. Confess
Ever wondered about the difference between admission and confession? And don’t say there isn’t because there IS! Admit and confess is a pair of words that usually tips of writers while writing their…
Immigrate vs. Emigrate
Alan emigrated from America and immigrated to Australia.The above sentence might be a little confusing for you as the two words which you thought had the same meaning imply differently. The words imm…
Historic vs. Historical
The words historical and historic were synonymous to each other back in the 18th century meaning something that belonged to or is representative of the past. Historic was used as a shortened for…
Principal vs. Principle
Our principal made it compulsory to follow all school principles.Principal and principle are a pair of words that are called homophone, meaning they have same pronunciation but very different meaning…
Capital vs. Capitol
The legislators were called to the capitol to discuss the issues of country’s capital.The above sentence constitutes two words, capital and capitol, which are both homophones. This means that capital…
Broach vs. Brooch
She sat on the couch, handed me a pearl brooch and broached the sensitive subject of her declining health.Broach and broach are two words that have same pronunciation and almost similar spellings (wi…
Paralyze vs. Paralyse
“The patient’s spinal cord is paralyzed,” said the doctor. Did the author use right spellings of paralyze in the above sentence? Are you in doubt about the spellings and need more information to deci…
Pretence vs. Pretense
This not very common word is often confused for its alternative half making it difficult for young writers to make a decision on what the right spellings of the word are. Consider the following sente…
Addition vs. Edition
He bought a car in addition to the truck he got last week. The new edition of the book will be published next month. Addition and edition are homophones that is, they sound the same but spell and mea…
Further vs. Farther
Further research is necessary. The red car is farther away than the blue car. Contrary to popular opinion, further and farther don't have the same meaning. Basically, further refers to something that…
Allusion vs. Illusion
The nouns allusion and illusion sound quite similar, and they both have connotations of intangibility. As a result, they are sometimes confused by writers. Consider the sentences below; The Simpsons …
Allude vs. Elude
He eluded to the problem but did not mention it. The thief alluded the police. Can you spot the mistake in the above two sentences? Take a minute to read both sentences carefully and see if you can f…
Creak vs. Creek
The words creak, creek sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. Consider the sentences below: From inside came the creak and moan of a swinging door. Let’s go on down to the creek. C…
Retch vs. Wretch
The English language doesn’t seem to be lacking in synonyms for the verb “vomit.” We have “upchuck,” “puke,” “hurl,” “heave,” and “retch,” to name a few. So do we really need to add another one, even…
Aluminium vs. Aluminum
English is a complicated language and it may confuse its learners and native speakers alike due to some very similar words or words that have more than one spellings. Aluminium and aluminum are an ex…
Enrol vs. Enroll
Enrol vs. EnrollThere are many spelling differences between American and British English. One involves the doubling of consonants before suffixing. The British are much more likely to do so than thei…
Homophones
The most common example is the colour “red” and the past tense of the verb “read” which is also pronounced as “red” but the spelling is same as the base verb – read. E.g. I have read all the words m…
How to form embedded questions?
What is your favorite color? I guess the answer isn’t black. If it is black, then fine because I love black too. Let’s ask this question a bit differently. Would you tell me what your favorite color …
Passive voice and why we need it
Here are some more practical examples of passive voice usage - 1.      The cameras are watching you – it doesn't make much sense to say this. Instead, “You are being watched”…
When to use “When”
When as an interrogative pronoun Quite simply, when is used to ask questions related to time. For example, When are you planning to come? When will Tony reach London? When was the last time you met y…
The verb GO
Go -ing (not a phrasal verb) This is not a phrasal verb but I am discussing it to clear doubts in forming sentences using ‘going’ When you use going, you need not use any prepositions afterwards. For…
Much, Many, More...
Much A typical example of much is ‘how much?’ which tells about an uncountable quantity. No one knows how to count the ‘much’. For example ‘Much has been spoken about the topic but without any concl…
Imitate, Intimate & Intimidate
Imitate (verb) – simply put, imitate is to copy someone or something, do same things as someone else. For example, ·        Monkeys imitate what humans do · …
Conditional verbs
1.   Zero conditional     When your action gives a 100% result.
If you want a receipt, press this button. If you heat ice, it melts. If you want to leave a message, speak…
Eve vs. Even vs. Evening
Evening (noun) – is the time between afternoon and night. The exact time can vary, but essentially it is the time from 4pm-7pm. For example, “nice Sunday evening”, “Let us meet tomorrow evening to …
Principle vs. Principal
Principal As an adjective, Principal means something of prime importance. That is, first and foremost. For example – ·         Manhattan’s principal pla…
Amber and Igor - Primitive Ancestors
You might think of nouns as naming words. It’s not hard to see why our primitive ancestors dreamed them up, at roughly the same time my eighth-grade English teacher, Miss Hamrick, came on the scene. …
Nouns - Words That Name
Let’s start with the noun. Here, you’ll learn about the nature of the noun and three of its main functions in our language: (1) subjects, (2) objects, and (3) complements. Then, in later sections, we…
Groups of Words Acting as Nouns
I realize that you are glued to this website, riveted by the compelling material and scintillating presentation. But just in case your attention is wandering a bit, LET ME SHOUT AT YOU AND WAKE YOU U…
Noun Function 5 - Indirect Object
Here’s a function of the noun we skipped over in our general overview above. Look at the following example. Then we’ll discuss the nature of the indirect object.
5. Indirect Object
Noun Function 8 - Noun Modifiers
Nouns often modify other nouns, as in noun modifier or sentence structure. We have thousands of terms where a first noun modifies an ensuing noun: hotdog bun football
Noun Function 10 - Noun Absolutes
And now we reach the end of the list and find one of the most potent structures the English language makes available to aspiring writers.
But before visiting noun absolutes, let’s review. Here’s t…
Finite Verb - Tense, Person, Number, Mood
A finite verb is just that: finite. It’s finite in time, as in present, past, future, and other time dimensions.
Tense, What Is It?
When we talk about time in relation to verbs…
Irregular Verbs
In the English language, we have fewer than 200 irregular verbs. (A fairly complete list appears in Garner Oxford, pp. 195-97.) Below are some causing the most trouble. Remember, use the past tense f…
Past Tense - How to Form
Here’s the tense the novelist should use, for the past tense describes what took place yesterday and not right now on the beach. Thus, from our novel of purple beach prose above: Juan looked<…
Future Tense - How to Form
When the activity you describe isn’t happening right now (present tense) and didn’t happen yesterday (past tense), perhaps it’ll take place tomorrow (future tense).
Other Ways of Expressin…
Conditional Structures of Verbs
The Conditionals: If p, then q
In the English language, we often express conditions. Naturally, Miss Hamrick, Amber, and Igor dreamed up some rules to govern how we form these str…
Conjugating Irregular Verbs
Our grades plummeted when we had to conjugate irregular verbs in Miss Hamrick’s class. There was no way to figure out a scheme or system that would explain the necessary forms of irregular verbs, tha…
Intransitive Verbs
Verbs Without Objects
Our forbears noticed something else about their growing list of action verbs. Some lacked the ability to pick up a noun all by themselves. They could not ear…
2. Where Do Adverbs Go?
Many writers make a mistake.
As we learned in the section on verbs, every one-word verb has a one-word present tense and a one-word past tense. Thus: I write and I wrote. These on…
Adverbs - Phrases and Clauses
More Shouting
SHOUTING time. Wake up! Again, learning this concept about chunks of words that act as nouns, adjectives, and now adverbs is crucial to your future as a writer.
A Summary of Adverbs
In this section, we met the last of the working words, the adverb. We have visited the noun, the verb, the adjective, and now the adverb.
We learned that adverbs come in a variety of sizes: one-wo…
Pronouns - Words Substituting for Words
In this section, we’ll learn about pronouns. We have seven kinds in the English language. They cause all kinds of problems, even to people in positions of power. After all, haven’t you heard someone …
1. Personal Pronouns
I, Me, My, Mine, We, Us, Our, Ours, etc.
Let’s start with the personal pronouns, those that take the place of people or other living or once-living beings. Personal pronouns can r…
Person - Three People
Only Three People Exist on Earth
Amber, Igor, and Miss Hamrick realized a long time ago that people mostly talk about only one thing—other people. That is, they gossip. They recog…
Antecedents - Number and Gender
Pronoun Agreement
You must use a plural pronoun to refer to a plural noun, a singular pronoun to refer to a singular noun. This rule is called agreement in number. Thus: The young…
Sexist Writing
Sexist Writing - A Quagmire
When Amber, Igor, and Miss Hamrick developed our language, they dreamed up another rule:
Pronouns must agree with the gender of the nouns th…
Prepositions - Words That Glue
Now let’s explore a very important part of speech, the preposition. This little word helps us hook nouns onto sentences. When we do, we form prepositional phrases. When you complete this section, you…
Pronoun as the Object of a Preposition
Object of a Preposition
A noun attached to a sentence by a preposition is the object of the preposition, which requires the objective case of a pronoun taking the place of the nou…
Introducing Quotations with the “Like” Word
I'm like ...
Usually, people use tobelike to introduce quoted sources. In that form, it doesn’t harm the language too much or totally prevent thought from taking place. We can hea…
Hyphens and Compound Words
Introduction
In chapter 3 of the eBook Understanding the Parts of Speech, you’ll learn about compound adjectives, those multiword, often made-up adjectives that enliven our writin…
Rules on Direct Quotation
Many writers violate rules governing the use of quotation marks. They mix up the rules on which of the other punctuation marks go inside or outside the ending quotation marks. You'll find independent…
Subjunctive mood
What is mood? – a mood is a form a verb takes to show how it (the verb) should be regarded. For example, command, wish, request etc… Subjunctive moods tell about a wish or suggestion. Subjunctive sen…
The ^caret symbol
Origin of the caret symbol Caret is a Latin word which means ‘to be separated’. It is also called as circumflex. Here are a few places where caret symbol is used – 1. Computer programming languages a…
Phrasal verbs with ‘Get’
Get – as a separate word get means to acquire or have something. When combined with several prepositions, the meaning doesn’t remain the same. 1.       Get up – to wake …
How to Stay Motivated to Finish a Book
How to start writing a book? How to stay motivated while writing a book? How to stay motivated to finish something that can turn into a long and complicated process? As with any creative endeavor, w…
Cleft sentences and inversion
Inverted sentences – Consider the following example – We have never seen this kind of support before. Here, the subject is ‘We’, ‘have’ is the auxiliary verb. Let us change the order now – Never ha…
The uses of ‘used to’
Used to Used+to – the combination usually lets the speaker tell about a habit. It could be in the past, present or future. When used in the past tense, it generally refers to habits that are now disc…
So vs. Such
So So is a conjunction. It can join two sentences. ·         I like her, so, I want to date her. ·         I want to wa…
Remember vs Reminder vs Remainder
Remember Remember is a verb which means to think of an occurrence in the past or to keep in mind something that has been told. Examples – ·         Always rem…
Collective Noun
Noun is the main part of a sentence and one of the most important pillars of English grammar. Noun is the name of thing, place or person in a sentence. A noun can further be classified into proper no…
Antecedent
English seems a pretty simple language at one glance but when you go deeper into it you will realize that there are many terms and things in this language which you are not familiar with. Antecedent …
Appositive
Did you just recently hear about appositives and now desperately want to know what they are and how they function? You came to the right page. Appositive is a relatively uncommon grammar term which m…
Count Nouns
By now, we have come across multiple types of nouns and pronouns in our everyday language. You might also vaguely remember a lesson about count nouns from your High school English class. All these ty…
Contractions
How’s your foot now?Haven’t you heard the news?We shouldn’t stay here.We all have come across words like these where some of the letters in the word are omitted making the word shorter. These types o…
Infinitive Verb
Till now I have written and posted about various forms that a verb can take in sentences of English language. Today I came across another form or type of verb that exist in English language and so I …
Grammatical Object
We know what objects are? Don’t we? Object itself is a common noun and refers to something that can be seen and touched. Even a beginner level learner of English language knows and understands the te…
Predicate
Do you know what a predicate is? It sounds somehow familiar but only a few of us really understand the meaning of the term. Predicate is a grammatical term that is used often in English language and …
Types of Pronouns
A pronoun is a word that replaces a noun in a sentence. A noun which is a name, place or thing when replaced by a word is known as a pronoun. A pronoun is used in a sentence to give a smooth reading …
Pronoun
English language is considered one of the easiest languages on Earth when compared to Chinese, French and Arabic etc. which are way more complicated. When it comes to a language, its grammar is the m…
What are Homographs
We are all familiar with synonyms – they are words that mean the same thing. For rich writing, we use different words in different situations to convey the same thing – for example, I can say that ‘h…
A short guide to improving your grammar and increase your vocabulary in a month
Working with My Paper Writer services present a great way of learning from professionals. They are very resourceful in helping you make the right choice of words and vocabulary to apply in your writi…
Adapt vs. Adept vs. Apt vs. Adopt
Apt Apt is an adjective that describes the right situation for something or the person who is perfectly suitable for some situation. Apt can also be used to describe someone who is quick to learn. Ap…
What types of plagiarism exist?
Different Types of Plagiarism
There are diverse plagiarism types. While analyzing the gravity, extend and plagiarism spectrum it is important to determine if it’s unintentional or intentional. Tha…
How to Avoid Grammar Mistakes in Your Writing?
The truth is, it is nearly impossible to write a 3000-word essay that is completely free of grammar and spelling errors. However, there is a great chance that you can minimize the errors so much that…
Copular Verb
A verb is a word in a sentence that is performing the action in the sentence.Example:He likes tea.In the above example, likes is the verb as it is referring to the action taking place which is like o…
The role of grammar in learning foreign languages
Recently, the question has been raised more and more often about the role and importance of grammar directly in the process of teaching foreign languages. As you know, in the history of teaching fore…
Double Object
An object is the part of a sentence that. It is related to the subject and verb of the sentence and represents the noun on which the action is taking place by the subject.Today I will discuss about t…
Destroy or Destruct
Destroy and destruct are synonyms to each other.Synonyms are the pair of words which have similar meanings to each other and may be used in each other’s place.Destroy as verb:In English language, des…
Mold vs. Mould
British and American English have different rules when it comes to spelling the words. Americans omit the U that appears in some British words as a second vowel directly before a consonant. Therefore…
Maybe vs. May be
English language has a lot of compound words that refer to two completely different words being joined together to give a meaning that is usually different or same from the original meaning of the tw…
Older vs. Elder
Sometime back, we wrote an article about oldest vs eldest. On similar lines, today let us explore the comparative version – older vs elder.
Usually to talk about 2 or more things, we use old or ol…
Grammer vs. Grammar
In the English language, numerous words have sometimes multiple spellings while their meaning remains the same. However, that is not the case for grammar and grammer respectively as they cannot be us…
Lose vs. Loss
Lose and loss are a pair of words that have somewhat similar meanings which cause the most people to confuse them and use them in each other’s place.
Today I will discuss the meanings and usage of…
Canceled vs. Cancelled
People all around the world that live in harsh climatic conditions are quite familiar with both these words. Cancelled and canceled are quite similar words, with similar meanings but different spelli…
Me vs. I
Although these two are written and pronounced completely differently, "me" and "I" are often switched and used in the wrong context.
Let's see the main difference between them and the correct ways…
Ambiance vs. Ambience
You might have seen this word written both as "ambiance" and "ambience", so wondering which one is correct or whether any of these versions is wrong is a normal reaction.
Is "ambience" confused fo…
Forth vs. Fourth
Forth vs. Fourth
Generally, words that sound identical and have very similar spellings create confusion among English speakers, who are not sure anymore about the meaning of each. This is exactly …
Explicit vs. Implicit
Explicit vs. Implicit
Have you ever confused "explicit" for "implicit" in a sentence, or at least wondered whether you should use the first one or the second? No worries, confusions are frequently…
Analyze vs. Analyse
Analyze vs. Analyse
"Analyze" and "analyse" are two other English words confusing people around with their spelling. They are pronounced in the very same way, yet a lot of people are never sure wh…
Enclosed vs. Inclosed
What "enclosed" means probably anybody knows. If not, we'll explain it immediately below. There's nothing difficult about it. What is, anyway, questionable and often confusing, is the correct spellin…
Expresso vs. Espresso
All coffee lovers and, in fact, most people that have entered a coffee shop, a bar or a restaurant, know what an espresso is. But what is an "expresso"? Some might get confused by this word, knowing …
Fiction vs. Non Fiction
When looking for books to read, or even in daily conversation, we often read or hear about “fiction” and “non fiction”. A “fiction book”, a “non fiction story”, a fact that is “fiction”… While these …
Monologue vs. Soliloquy
There is a common confusion in English that people make between “monologue” and “soliloquy”. Some have the tendency to use one instead of the other, regardless of that fact that they actually don’t m…
Flush out vs. Flesh out
Flush out” and “flesh out” are two expressions commonly confused and used wrongly. Misspelling them is something quite natural, given the fact that they look so similar and only have one letter disti…
Aloud vs. Allowed
This is one of the most common misspellings that appear in English grammar: “aloud” and “allowed”. These words are often confused, especially by those who aren’t sure what they mean. The main reason …
Install vs. Instill
The spellings of “install” and “instill” are so similar, distinct due to one letter only, that mistaking them can actually be not mandatory, but simply a typing error that you didn’t even observe. Th…
euphemism vs. euphuism
A euphemism is an inoffensive expression used in place of one which may be considered offensive or vulgar. But euphuism is an absurdly overblown and affected style of writing.
Moral vs. Morale
Do “moral” and “morale” refer to different concepts originating in the same noun? Are there any differences in their meanings that are causing the different spellings of these words? Or is it about B…
Forego vs. Forgo
While some believe that “forego” and “forgo” are perfect synonyms, other claim that they have completely different meanings. If these two paronyms managed to confuse you really badly, then don’t let …
Cue vs. Queue
Cue” and “queue” are one of the problematic English words, especially for inexperienced users. The confusion is owed, obviously, to the amazing similarity between their pronunciation. If you don’t se…
Future vs Feature
Future Perhaps, we use the word ‘future’ everyday to refer to what is going to happen next. Future is a time after the present (now). In English (and other languages), future is a verb tense that ind…
Grill vs. Grille
Grill” and “grille” represent one of the most frequently misspelled pair of English words. They sound and look extremely similar, and a lot of English users decide not to add that last “-e” anymore, …
Emphasise vs. Emphasize
Emphasise” and “emphasize” are causing quite a lot of controversial opinions and discussions. Some claim that “emphasise” is the misspelling of “emphasize”, others say it’s vice versa, and other beli…
How To Write An Amazing Blog Post
Picture a cheese sandwich — a truly terrible one. What does it look like? If you’re anything like me, you’re thinking of something like a single square of processed cheese (I see it curling and brown…
Base vs. Baseball
The lowest part of something or the part that it stands on, as in the base of a lamp.To use something as the starting point for something else.The place from which a business, an army, etc., is contr…
For vs. Four
Intended to be used on or with.Meeting the needs of.Over the time or distance of.Due to.In honor of or on behalf of.Worth the amount of.Intended for or sent to.In place of.Because.
The whole numbe…
Levee vs. Levy
A bank built up near a river to prevent flooding.A place for boats or ships to land.
To impose or collect by lawful actions or by force.A tax.
Gas Mask vs. Gas Station
A mask that fits over the whole face to keep a person from breathing poisonous gas.
A place that sells gasoline, oil, and other things needed to keep motor vehicles running.
Zoo vs. Zoology
A place where animals are kept for people to see or study them.
The science that deals with the study of animal life.
Peal vs. Peel
"Peal" and "peel" may sound almost the same. This, for a non-native English user, might be confusing. If you find yourself wondering which spelling is correct for your context, or aim to understand w…
Travelled vs. Traveled
Lee travelled to the Middle East during vacations. Or had she traveled? Travel, a simple and common word of English, when used in its derivative forms can be written in two ways; with a single l or w…
Odd vs. Odds
Odd vs. Odds Clarifying any misunderstandings is our top priority here, at Grammar.com. We want to make sure that we prepare the best explanations for the most confusing sets of words. This is certai…

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