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Likeable vs. likable

Both spellings are acceptable in both British and American English, but British English strongly prefers likeable, while American English slightly prefers likable....

added by Robert_Haigh
1 day ago

Copyright vs Copywrite

Copyright Copyright is a noun, which means exclusive legal rights of something – a work of art, music, document, poem, film name or any original work. This object or piece of work cannot be copied or used without permission from the owner or paymen...

added by ramyashankar
7 days ago

dissent vs. dissension

These words are not equivalent. Dissent is disagreement with an opinion, especially with a majority view. Dissension is serious and persistent disagreement among a group of people, especially ill-natured disagreement which leads to quarrels. ...

added by Robert_Haigh
7 days ago

dissatisfied vs. unsatisfied

When you are dissatisfied you are disappointed, unhappy or frustrated. When you are unsatisfied, you feel that you need more of something. Only a person can be dissatisfied, while an abstract thing like hunger or a demand for goods can be unsatisfied...

added by Robert_Haigh
7 days ago

waste vs. wastage

The word wastage is not a fancy equivalent for waste. Waste is failure to use something which could easily be used. But wastage is loss resulting from unavoidable natural causes, such as evaporation....

added by Robert_Haigh
16 days ago

obsolescent vs. obsolete

Something which is obsolescent is dropping out of use but is not yet entirely gone, while something which is obsolete has completely disappeared from use....

added by Robert_Haigh
16 days ago

childish vs. childlike

Though childish is occasionally used neutrally to mean 'appropriate to a child', as in my childish efforts at drawing, it is much more commonly encountered as a term of contempt applied to an adult, as in the familiar  Don't be so childish! ...

added by Robert_Haigh
19 days ago

ketchup, catchup, catsup

In British English, ketchup is the only form in use. American English still uses all three forms, though ketchup is the recommended form for American writers....

added by Robert_Haigh
19 days ago

learnèd word

A word taken from a classical language. For example, instead of breakable, English often uses the Latin word fragile; instead of dog we sometimes use the Latin word canine; instead of saying that a disease is catching, we often prefer the L...

added by Robert_Haigh
20 days ago

diachronic

Pertaining to the time element in language; involving change in a language over time. A diachronic approach to the study of a language is the study of its development over a period of time....

added by Robert_Haigh
24 days ago

tag question

A brief question which is tacked on to the end of a statement. English uses two different kinds of tag question, both of somewhat complex formation. Consider the statement Astrid is Norwegian. One kind of tag question extends this statement so as to ...

added by Robert_Haigh
24 days ago

minor sentence

Any piece of speech or writing which does not have the form of a complete sentence but which is normal in context. Examples: "Any news?"; "No smoking!"; "Hello."; "As if I would know."; "Wow!...

added by Robert_Haigh
24 days ago

double negative

Any construction in which two or more negative words occur in a single clause. Examples 1: "I didn't see nothing" (= I didn't see anything); Examples 2: "No football team can't win no championship without no defenders" (= No football team can win a c...

added by Robert_Haigh
24 days ago

COVID-19 Capitalization

The word "coronavirus" is not a proper noun, and is not the name of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. Therefore, "CoronaVirus", "Coronavirus", and "Corona Virus" are invalid. Adding a space, like in "corona virus", is also invalid.You can't say someon...

added by ryan_1
25 days ago

plurale tantum

 A NOUN which is invariably plural in form, even though it may be singular in sense. Examples include oats, cattle, remains, pants, scissors, binoculars, pyjamas, shorts and tweezers. Such nouns are awkward to count: we cannot say *a pants or * ...

added by Robert_Haigh
25 days ago

phoney vs. phony

Which spelling is correct? Both are acceptable. British English prefers phoney, while American English prefers phony....

added by Robert_Haigh
26 days ago

snicker vs. snigger

snicker is the American form, snigger is the British form. As simple as that....

added by Robert_Haigh
27 days ago

forbid vs. prohibit

These words have the same meaning but behave differently. We forbid someone to do something, but we prohibit someone from doing something. It is wrong to confuse the two. With a simple object, however, either verb may be used: "The police forbade dem...

added by Robert_Haigh
1 month ago

derisive vs. derisory

These words are, in some instances, interchangeable, but not in all cases. We commonly use derisive to mean mocking or contemptuous. Most authorities recognise derisory as an alternative here, although it is not recommended. More commonly, we use der...

added by Robert_Haigh
1 month ago

imposter vs. impostor

The spellings imposter and impostor are both widely used, and both are acceptable, but some authorities prefer impostor.  ...

added by Robert_Haigh
1 month ago

Bosphorus vs. Bosporus

Both Bosporus and Bosphorus are acceptable spellings for the narrow, natural strait and internationally significant waterway located in northwestern Turkey. ...

added by Robert_Haigh
1 month ago

euphemism vs. euphuism

A euphemism is an inoffensive expression used in place of one which may be considered offensive or vulgar. But euphuism is an absurdly overblown and affected style of writing....

added by Robert_Haigh
1 month ago

"A" and "AN" - How to use?

Hi friends,The general rule is that, “an” is to be used before a vowel and “a” is to beUsed before a consonant.This rule is applicable in most of the situations.But in some cases the word “an” is used before consonant and at the same time...

added by ahilankan
1 month ago

Why is Learning Foreign Languages Exciting?

At school, we learn a foreign language for several years, in most cases, because of the academic program. For our age and brief life experience, we underestimate the importance of knowing a different language and speaking fluently in it. Following gr...

added by acronimous
1 month ago

saccharin vs. saccharine

The artificial sweetener is saccharin; the adjective meaning 'sugary' or 'excessively sweet' is saccharine....

added by Robert_Haigh
1 month ago

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