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Imperative mood

Mood Mood indicates the expression of a sentence – for example whether it a question, command, request or fact. Consider the following sentences – Go from here right now! I wish you could go from here right now. Think about the difference betw...

added by ramyashankar
12 days ago

Vacate vs. Evacuate

Evacuate Evacuate (verb) is a stronger term which means emptying a space because of some emergency for safety purpose. Commonly, this word is used when there is a problem and a large number of people are being moved out of a place. For example – ...

added by ramyashankar
19 days ago

Conditional verbs

1.   Zero conditional     When your action gives a 100% result. If you want a receipt, press this button. If you heat ice, it melts. If you want to leave a message, speak after the beep.   Notice that for actions which h...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

Rejected vs. Dejected

Rejected Rejected is the past tense and past participle of the word reject which means to not agree or accept for something. You reject something when it is unacceptable. For example – ·         He rejected...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

Approach vs Reproach

Approach Approach as a verb is: ·         to come near something or someone. Eg – The car is approaching the petrol station. ·         to speak to someone regarding...

added by acronimous
1 month ago

Found vs Founded

Find Find as a verb is to spot or get something. It can also mean a discovery or realization. Find as a noun is usually a discovery of something very important and of great value. Here are few examples of find – ·     &n...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

How to Avoid Grammar Mistakes in Your Writing?

The truth is, it is nearly impossible to write a 3000-word essay that is completely free of grammar and spelling errors. However, there is a great chance that you can minimize the errors so much that the reader will not notice the small issues. This ...

added by acronimous
1 month ago

Oldest vs Eldest

Eldest is used while referring to age with respect to seniority. It is used to refer to related members of family. The word has been derived from old English ieldest and can also be said as ‘most grown up’ in simple terms. Examples –  &nbs...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

Last vs Least

Last Last, the superlative form of late (the other one being latest) has been derived from the old English word “latost”. In some situations, we cannot use latest as the superlative degree of late, instead we use last. For example – “I reach...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

What types of plagiarism exist?

Different Types of PlagiarismThere are diverse plagiarism types. While analyzing the gravity, extend and plagiarism spectrum it is important to determine if it’s unintentional or intentional. That’s the reason to why adverse knowledge of egregiou...

added by acronimous
1 month ago

Initiate, Instigate & Investigate

Initiate Remember, the word ‘init’ means “start”. So, to initiate something means to start something new or to ‘start-off’. It could be anything from a new project, construction of a new house, wedding preparations and so on. Whenever you...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Casual vs. Causal

Casual – ·        to not take something very seriously. Example – he has a very casual attitude towards work. ·        Something thats not permanent – example, a relation...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Imitate, Intimate & Intimidate

Imitate (verb) – simply put, imitate is to copy someone or something, do same things as someone else. For example, ·        Monkeys imitate what humans do ·        Children i...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Effect vs Affect

The cause and effect story Well, the #metoo movement started with some genuinely affected ladies coming forward and sharing their horrifying experiences. However, the negative effect of the movement was that some people misjudged them and started pok...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Restrict Vs Constrict

Overview Just to give a general idea, let us understand the basic meaning with an example. What is restrict? – To restrict someone from doing something is to control them. For example, you would have seen boards like ‘entry restricted’ outside ...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

Much, Many, More...

Much A typical example of much is ‘how much?’ which tells about an uncountable quantity. No one knows how to count the ‘much’. For example ‘Much has been spoken about the topic but without any conclusion.’ How much money do we need? I f...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

Distrustful vs Mistrustful

Origin of the words Distrustful Distrustful is an adjective of the word distrust, which is the opposite of trust and simply means absence of trust. The word first originated in 1505-15 and is in the same lines as some other words like disappoint, di...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

Auxiliary verbs

BE ‘To be’ means to exist. ‘Be’ can be used in many ways. ·    To form continuous tenses – present, past, future – be takes the form of am, is, are, was, were, will be – o   I am going to the park. o &nbs...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

6 most commonly confused words

1. Complimentary vs complementary The word with the ‘I’ means getting good comments and feedback from someone. For e.g., I got a compliment today for my dress. This word with ‘I’ is associated with feelings/remarks and not any material things...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

Interested vs. Interesting

Now let’s try to understand when to use which one. Use interesting to talk about a ‘thing’. Something is interesting. But, you/I/we (people) are interested in something i.e. use interested to talk about someone’s feelings, likes or dislikes....

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

List of Homonyms

Note: Some references use the term Homonyms more broadly, to refer to homographs (words spelled the same as each other but pronounced differently) or homophones (words spelled differently but pronounced the same).addressfallglowerkenremotearmfatgobke...

added by acronimous
4 months ago

The verb GO

Go -ing (not a phrasal verb) This is not a phrasal verb but I am discussing it to clear doubts in forming sentences using ‘going’ When you use going, you need not use any prepositions afterwards. For example – “I am going for skating” is no...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

When to use “When”

When as an interrogative pronoun Quite simply, when is used to ask questions related to time. For example, When are you planning to come? When will Tony reach London? When was the last time you met your parents?   Contraction of “when is” Wh...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

Present perfect tense

First let’s understand the syntax – Use has/have and 3rd form of verb to form present perfect sentence. For example – We have seen this movie. (see(1) saw(2) seen(3)) She has cleaned her room. (clean(1) cleaned(2) cleaned(3)) For some verbs (...

added by ramyashankar
4 months ago

Passive voice and why we need it

Here are some more practical examples of passive voice usage - 1.      The cameras are watching you – it doesn't make much sense to say this. Instead, “You are being watched” conveys the message in a better way. 2. ...

added by ramyashankar
5 months ago

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