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Interested vs. Interesting

Now let’s try to understand when to use which one. Use interesting to talk about a ‘thing’. Something is interesting. But, you/I/we (people) are interested in something i.e. use interested to talk about someone’s feelings, likes or dislikes....

added by ramyashankar
5 days ago

List of Homonyms

Note: Some references use the term Homonyms more broadly, to refer to homographs (words spelled the same as each other but pronounced differently) or homophones (words spelled differently but pronounced the same).addressfallglowerkenremotearmfatgobke...

added by acronimous
6 days ago

The verb GO

Go -ing (not a phrasal verb) This is not a phrasal verb but I am discussing it to clear doubts in forming sentences using ‘going’ When you use going, you need not use any prepositions afterwards. For example – “I am going for skating” is no...

added by ramyashankar
9 days ago

When to use “When”

When as an interrogative pronoun Quite simply, when is used to ask questions related to time. For example, When are you planning to come? When will Tony reach London? When was the last time you met your parents?   Contraction of “when is” Wh...

added by ramyashankar
18 days ago

Present perfect tense

First let’s understand the syntax – Use has/have and 3rd form of verb to form present perfect sentence. For example – We have seen this movie. (see(1) saw(2) seen(3)) She has cleaned her room. (clean(1) cleaned(2) cleaned(3)) For some verbs (...

added by ramyashankar
21 days ago

Passive voice and why we need it

Here are some more practical examples of passive voice usage - 1.      The cameras are watching you – it doesn't make much sense to say this. Instead, “You are being watched” conveys the message in a better way. 2. ...

added by ramyashankar
29 days ago

Either-Neither-Both

1. With too and so respectively Differences between Either and too (both either and too are used at the end of a sentence) – Consider this example – Person 1 – I got good marks. Person 2 – I got good marks too. We use either as a negative&n...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

Prepositions – At vs. In vs. On

In, at and on are commonly used prepositions and are used in different situations – be it telling adate, or time, or about a place and so on. Let’s discuss these prepositions and their uses in detailwith reference to time.Useat – for telling ex...

added by acronimous
1 month ago

shall vs. will vs. going to

A lot of people get confused on correct usage of will, going to & shall. Let’s take this example to start with – Will you go to school tomorrow? Shall we go to school tomorrow? Did you spot the difference? While asking a question, will is u...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

When to use “Would” instead of “Will”

Many non-native English learners find it confusing when it comes to the uses of “would”. The word “would” has miscellaneous uses, so confusion is not unlikely. This post aims to clear the confusion. Most of the times, the source of the confus...

added by otikkrom
1 month ago

How to form embedded questions?

What is your favorite color? I guess the answer isn’t black. If it is black, then fine because I love black too. Let’s ask this question a bit differently. Would you tell me what your favorite color is? See the difference. It asks the same thing ...

added by otikkrom
1 month ago

Homophones

The most common example is the colour “red” and the past tense of the verb “read” which is also pronounced as “red” but the spelling is same as the base verb – read. E.g. I have read all the words marked in red. Maid/made – maid is a...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

List of Adverbs

abnormally absentmindedly accidentally actually adventurously afterwards almost always annually anxiously arrogantly awkwardly bashfully beautifully bitterly bleakly blindly blissfully boastfully boldly bravely briefly brightl...

added by acronimous
4 months ago

Most Common British/American English Spelling Mistakes

While both countries speak the same language, no one can deny that there are quite a few differences in the way that some words are spelled. In many cases, people often confuse the spelling of many words and they can’t tell which is correct and...

added by Ashley_Wheeler
5 months ago

On Board vs. Onboard

When you are safely aboard a vessel, like a cruise ship, are you onboard or on board? What about when you agree with someone’s inspiring plan to save the world? Are you onboard or on board? Actually, the answer to both of those questions is the sam...

added by angbeenc
5 months ago

Oneself vs. One’s Self

Pronouns are complicated, but, for as complicated as they are, the English language doesn’t even have a full set. While we have a few third-person singular pronouns, like he and she, we don’t have one that doesn’t specify gender. Technically, w...

added by angbeenc
5 months ago

On Accident vs. By Accident

Adverbs are useful, but too many of them can clutter up your writing and make it a chore to read. Sometimes, adverb phrases can fill the same function in a more eloquent manner. On accident and by accident are adverb phrases that mean the same thing ...

added by angbeenc
5 months ago

Online vs. On-Line

In today’s connected culture, few words are as relevant to daily life as online. A connection to the Internet has become one of the easiest ways to do many basic tasks, like shopping, studying, and even finding a job. Like so many words, though, th...

added by angbeenc
5 months ago

Onto vs. On to

It can be tough sometimes to remember the difference between onto and on to. They look almost the same written on paper, separated by just one little space. Plus, when you say them out loud, they sound almost indistinguishable. But even though you ma...

added by angbeenc
5 months ago

Translucent vs. Opaque

If you can see through something, is it opaque, translucent, or transparent? Two of these words might fit, depending on how clearly you can see through the object, but the other word is definitely not accurate. All three of these adjectives describe ...

added by angbeenc
5 months ago

Older vs. Elder

If you were looking for a word to describe someone who is more advanced in age than someone else, what word would you choose? Would you pick elder or older? Is someone older or elder than someone else? Or would you settle on a different word entirely...

added by angbeenc
5 months ago

Common Dissertation Writing Mistakes to Avoid

Your dissertation sure is important! It can make or break your time at university. The thing is, as you’ve never written anything this long before, writing a text like this can be quite overwhelming and there are a lot of opportunities for new mist...

added by Ashley_Wheeler
6 months ago

Offense vs. Offence

The words offence and offense can be confusing for those not sure of their differences, and not knowing which to use and when can cause a writer to second-guess his or her work, even though there might not be anything wrong with it. Do these words ha...

added by angbeenc
6 months ago

Octopi vs. Octopuses

English borrows many words from other languages. These words are called “loanwords.” Most are from Latin, French, and the Germanic languages, but some are borrowed from other sources. Octopus is one of these loanwords, which adds to the confusion...

added by angbeenc
6 months ago

Obtain vs. Attain

Attain and obtain are two different words that are often confused with each other by writers but both have their own distinct meanings.Keeping track of these two words can save you and your writing from looking sloppy, but it can be difficult to reme...

added by angbeenc
6 months ago

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