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Imitate, Intimate & Intimidate

Imitate (verb) – simply put, imitate is to copy someone or something, do same things as someone else. For example, ·        Monkeys imitate what humans do ·        Children i...

added by ramyashankar
11 days ago

Effect vs Affect

The cause and effect story Well, the #metoo movement started with some genuinely affected ladies coming forward and sharing their horrifying experiences. However, the negative effect of the movement was that some people misjudged them and started pok...

added by ramyashankar
14 days ago

Restrict Vs Constrict

Overview Just to give a general idea, let us understand the basic meaning with an example. What is restrict? – To restrict someone from doing something is to control them. For example, you would have seen boards like ‘entry restricted’ outside ...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

Much, Many, More...

Much A typical example of much is ‘how much?’ which tells about an uncountable quantity. No one knows how to count the ‘much’. For example ‘Much has been spoken about the topic but without any conclusion.’ How much money do we need? I f...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

Distrustful vs Mistrustful

Origin of the words Distrustful Distrustful is an adjective of the word distrust, which is the opposite of trust and simply means absence of trust. The word first originated in 1505-15 and is in the same lines as some other words like disappoint, di...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

Auxiliary verbs

BE ‘To be’ means to exist. ‘Be’ can be used in many ways. ·    To form continuous tenses – present, past, future – be takes the form of am, is, are, was, were, will be – o   I am going to the park. o &nbs...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

6 most commonly confused words

1. Complimentary vs complementary The word with the ‘I’ means getting good comments and feedback from someone. For e.g., I got a compliment today for my dress. This word with ‘I’ is associated with feelings/remarks and not any material things...

added by ramyashankar
1 month ago

Interested vs. Interesting

Now let’s try to understand when to use which one. Use interesting to talk about a ‘thing’. Something is interesting. But, you/I/we (people) are interested in something i.e. use interested to talk about someone’s feelings, likes or dislikes....

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

List of Homonyms

Note: Some references use the term Homonyms more broadly, to refer to homographs (words spelled the same as each other but pronounced differently) or homophones (words spelled differently but pronounced the same).addressfallglowerkenremotearmfatgobke...

added by acronimous
2 months ago

The verb GO

Go -ing (not a phrasal verb) This is not a phrasal verb but I am discussing it to clear doubts in forming sentences using ‘going’ When you use going, you need not use any prepositions afterwards. For example – “I am going for skating” is no...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

When to use “When”

When as an interrogative pronoun Quite simply, when is used to ask questions related to time. For example, When are you planning to come? When will Tony reach London? When was the last time you met your parents?   Contraction of “when is” Wh...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Present perfect tense

First let’s understand the syntax – Use has/have and 3rd form of verb to form present perfect sentence. For example – We have seen this movie. (see(1) saw(2) seen(3)) She has cleaned her room. (clean(1) cleaned(2) cleaned(3)) For some verbs (...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Passive voice and why we need it

Here are some more practical examples of passive voice usage - 1.      The cameras are watching you – it doesn't make much sense to say this. Instead, “You are being watched” conveys the message in a better way. 2. ...

added by ramyashankar
2 months ago

Either-Neither-Both

1. With too and so respectively Differences between Either and too (both either and too are used at the end of a sentence) – Consider this example – Person 1 – I got good marks. Person 2 – I got good marks too. We use either as a negative&n...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

Prepositions – At vs. In vs. On

In, at and on are commonly used prepositions and are used in different situations – be it telling adate, or time, or about a place and so on. Let’s discuss these prepositions and their uses in detailwith reference to time.Useat – for telling ex...

added by acronimous
3 months ago

shall vs. will vs. going to

A lot of people get confused on correct usage of will, going to & shall. Let’s take this example to start with – Will you go to school tomorrow? Shall we go to school tomorrow? Did you spot the difference? While asking a question, will is u...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

When to use “Would” instead of “Will”

Many non-native English learners find it confusing when it comes to the uses of “would”. The word “would” has miscellaneous uses, so confusion is not unlikely. This post aims to clear the confusion. Most of the times, the source of the confus...

added by otikkrom
3 months ago

How to form embedded questions?

What is your favorite color? I guess the answer isn’t black. If it is black, then fine because I love black too. Let’s ask this question a bit differently. Would you tell me what your favorite color is? See the difference. It asks the same thing ...

added by otikkrom
3 months ago

Homophones

The most common example is the colour “red” and the past tense of the verb “read” which is also pronounced as “red” but the spelling is same as the base verb – read. E.g. I have read all the words marked in red. Maid/made – maid is a...

added by ramyashankar
3 months ago

List of Adverbs

abnormally absentmindedly accidentally actually adventurously afterwards almost always annually anxiously arrogantly awkwardly bashfully beautifully bitterly bleakly blindly blissfully boastfully boldly bravely briefly brightl...

added by acronimous
6 months ago

Most Common British/American English Spelling Mistakes

While both countries speak the same language, no one can deny that there are quite a few differences in the way that some words are spelled. In many cases, people often confuse the spelling of many words and they can’t tell which is correct and end...

added by Ashley_Wheeler
7 months ago

On Board vs. Onboard

When you are safely aboard a vessel, like a cruise ship, are you onboard or on board? What about when you agree with someone’s inspiring plan to save the world? Are you onboard or on board? Actually, the answer to both of those questions is the sam...

added by angbeenc
7 months ago

Oneself vs. One’s Self

Pronouns are complicated, but, for as complicated as they are, the English language doesn’t even have a full set. While we have a few third-person singular pronouns, like he and she, we don’t have one that doesn’t specify gender. Technically, w...

added by angbeenc
7 months ago

On Accident vs. By Accident

Adverbs are useful, but too many of them can clutter up your writing and make it a chore to read. Sometimes, adverb phrases can fill the same function in a more eloquent manner. On accident and by accident are adverb phrases that mean the same thing ...

added by angbeenc
7 months ago

Online vs. On-Line

In today’s connected culture, few words are as relevant to daily life as online. A connection to the Internet has become one of the easiest ways to do many basic tasks, like shopping, studying, and even finding a job. Like so many words, though, th...

added by angbeenc
7 months ago

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