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Latter vs. Ladder

Homophones are words that have similar pronunciations but different meanings. Ladder and latter are two homophones that give many writers trouble. In reality, these two words are never interchangeable, since they are actually different parts of speec...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Labor vs. Labour

When some Americans pursued a distinctly American form of English, one of the changes they decided to make was to simplify the spelling of certain words to more closely represent the ways they are likely to be pronounced by American speakers. Whether...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Labelled vs. Labeled

American and British English have many pesky spelling differences, often between two versions of the same word. These differences can be maddening for beginning writers and for learners of English. When you mark something with its name or purpose, ar...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Knit vs. Knitted

English verbs follow several patterns of conjugation. Many verbs are irregular, and some of those don’t follow the same rules as other verbs at all. Other verbs, though, are regular, and are conjugated according to predictable rules and conventions...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Night vs. Knight

Another day and another set of confusing words. Like so many words in English, knight and night have identical pronunciations, but they have incredibly different meanings. In fact, their definitions are in no way related at all.Today, I want to brief...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Knew vs. New

If two or more words sound the same when spoken out loud, but have different meanings, they are called homophones. Be careful not to confuse homophones with homographs, which also have different meanings but, instead, share a common spelling.Knew and...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

4 Hard Issues in the English Language for Non-Native Speakers

Did you know that the letter “e” is the most frequently used symbol in English? Orthat the majority of the English words start with the letter “s”? And oh, here is agood one: the most commonly used words in English are “you” and “I”.I...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Dive Deeper into the English Language with These Tips

Admit it – when someone tells you that he/she’s learning English, and it’s verydifficult, chances are that you don’t help or comfort them by giving some tips,sharing your personal hacks or doing anything that can make the studying processfor ...

added by acronimous
1 year ago

Expresso vs. Espresso

Coffee lovers have a special relationship with a certain type of concentrated, highly caffeinated coffee called espresso. Some English speakers pronounce the word with an X, like expresso. In coffee shops, more than in most businesses, keeping up app...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Eulogy vs. Elegy

The English language is full of confusing words that mix up writers and speakers alike, and most of this confusion surrounds English homophones. If two words have the same pronunciation but different meanings, they are called homophones. A classic se...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Inter vs. Intra

Did you play any sports in college? Well, if you didn’t play on the school’s football or basketball team, you might have played intramural sports—or is it intermural? These two English prefixes are tricky because they sound pretty close to each...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Valuable vs. Invaluable

Some English usage can look mystifying to outside observers. Often, though, even things which don’t seem to make sense on a superficial level actually do make sense after all. Invaluable and valuable, for example, seem to be opposites, but most Eng...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Jewelry vs. Jewellery

If your spouse has a birthday coming up, should you buy jewelry or jewellery? Choosing a birthday gift for a loved one can be a stressful shopping experience, but, luckily, knowing the difference between these two words do not have to be so nerve-rac...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Judgement vs. Judgment

The words judgment and judgement can cause a bit of confusion and unease in people’s writing because not many of writers are sure when to use which one. Are they just variants of the same word? Do they have different meanings or different functions...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Kneeled vs. Knelt

As you listen to English conversation, you may notice that not everyone uses the language in an identical manner. Differences in English speech may be due to pronunciation, grammar, or even word choice. Some words, like kneeled and knelt, are used in...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Enclosed vs. Inclosed

It would make all of our lives simpler if words had one universal, mutually agreed-upon spelling that never changed. While we’re at it, word meanings, pronunciations, and conjugations could be standardized, too. That’s not how English works, thou...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Indices vs. Indexes

When words have more than one variant, choosing between them can be difficult. Often, there is no hard and fast rule, so writers must rely on context to determine the best word to use. Many people aren’t sure whether to use indices or indexes, or e...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Indorsement vs. Endorsement

English contains many uncommon words that are only used in specific contexts. In some cases, these words may cross the border into jargon, but in other cases, they allow for clear distinctions between concepts which may be difficult to explain using ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Inequality vs. Inequity

If you’ve ever had a case of writer’s block from choosing between two very similar words in your writing, you’re not alone. English contains many words which are differentiated more by their conventional usage than by their definition. Inequali...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Inflict vs. Afflict

If someone stabs you with a knife, did they afflict you with a wound, or inflict a wound on you? On the other hand, when you catch a cold, are you inflicted by a virus, or afflicted with one? Many writers aren’t sure how to use inflict and afflict ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Inquiry vs. Enquiry

There are so many words in English that are either so similar to each other in spelling and pronunciation or their meanings are so close to each other that it’s almost impossible to tell them apart. This is the case with inquiry vs. enquiry. These ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Install vs. Instill

The words instill and install are almost indistinguishable when spoken out loud, and even in writing, they are only separated by one letter’s difference. Sometimes, words that are this similar are simply spelling variations of the same word, but th...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Incidents vs. Incidence

In formal writing situations, many writers attempt to make their writing overly technical or complex. This desire is understandable—academic and professional writing deal with more technical and complex topics than everyday English, and in these hi...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

In Route vs. En Route

When languages borrow from each other, they play fast and loose with spelling rules. Sometimes, the borrowed word or phrase will be altered so that it matches spelling norms of the new language. Other times, it is left as is, with little or no change...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

Imply vs. Infer

These two words are actually quite different in their meanings and in the subject who commits the act itself. Yet despite their differences, they are regularly confused with one another. This is understandable, however. These words aren’t used too ...

added by angbeenc
1 year ago

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