Found 330 articles starting with C: Page #4

Chapter 4 - Colon

The colon joins two independent clauses (compound sentence), introduces lists, and sets up quotations. Previous: Semicolons with Quotation Marks ...

Chapter 5 - Dash

Functions of the DashThe dash is one of the most effective punctuation marks of all. It can halt readers in their tracks—it makes them pay attention—as they read through your words of wisdom. Basically, the dash creates the b...

Chapter 5 - Subjunctive Mood

“If I was you, I’d learn the subjunctive mood.”In this chapter, you’ll find that even best-selling novelists have trouble with the subjunctive mood. It pays to know the meaning of mood and to use the various moods—especially ...

Chapter 6 - Dangling Participles

“When writing, your participle might dangle.”Here’s a biggie. Many highly educated people write sentences with dangling participles in them. Careful and knowledgeable readers—as in your boss or professor—know all about dangle...

Chapter 6 - Parentheses

IntroductionParentheses, like commas and dashes, may be used to set off amplifying, explanatory, or digressive elements. If the parenthetical elements bear a close logical relationship to the rest of the sentence, use commas....

Chapter 7 - Brackets

IntroductionBrackets are used to enclose editorial interpolations, corrections, explanations, or comments in quoted material.SicResist the temptation to use ...

Chapter 7 - “There,” “Their,” “They’re”

“Their mixing up they’re theres.” I included this chapter at the request of my son. He says that everyone in his company confuses these three words. So I wrote the chapter and emailed it to him, and he forwarded it t...

Chapter 8 - Question Mark

IntroductionIn creative writing, the question mark shows up all the time. In expository writing, question marks do appear—often as mistakes.The question mark serves a variety of roles.Ask a Question...

Chapter 8 - “Affect” vs. “Effect”

“Bad habits will effect your writing.”There are huge differences between the words affect and effect. Good writers know these differences and use the words correctly. Now you can, too.Aff...

Chapter 9 - Exclamation Point

IntroductionUse the exclamation point to shout. And don't shout much at all in expository writing. Let your prose show your emphasis: The Supreme Court flatly ruled against us! When 9...

Chapter 9 - “It’s” vs. “Its”

“Should you take out it’s apostrophe?”Hardly a day goes by without my seeing the use of its when the writer means it’s. Or it’s when the writer means its. The two expressions differ dramati...

characteristic - correct spelling

characteristicadjective and noun
Example: We enjoyed his characteristic laugh. adjective...

charity - correct spelling

charitynoun
Example: “Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.” —Charles Dickens....

charlatan - vocabulary

charlatan - noun
A person pretending to have more knowledge or skill than he or she actually possesses; a quack; a flamboyant deceiver. There is hardly any mental misery worse than that of having our own s...

Chart Showing Various Uses

Learn the various ways the word there can act in our language. Word Function...

chauvinism - correct spelling

chauvinismnoun
Not chauvanism.Example: The patriot’s chauvinism ignited the crowd of believers....

Cheap vs. Cheep

Cheap vs. Cheep Cheap and cheep both sound same but their meanings are entirely different. The words with similar sounds but different meaning and spellings are known as homophones. Homophones are misused and often mistaken for each other whil...

Check out vs Checkout

Check out Check out is a phrasal verb of the word check, which has 2 meanings: to look at someone/somethingto sign for something (like a will) You can also add a noun or pronoun between the words, like ‘check this ou...

Check vs. Cheque

The fact that you see words spelled very similarly and used with the same meaning often can be overwhelming, especially if you are not sure whether both of them are correct. The same applies to "check" and "cheque", which are often confusing or used ...

Check-in vs. Check in

Content about Check-in vs. Check in has been temporarily removed......

Checkout

[download_checkout]...

Checkout

[shoppingcart]...

chief - correct spelling

chiefnoun and adjective
Example: The chief of police launched the investigation. noun...

childish vs. childlike

Though childish is occasionally used neutrally to mean 'appropriate to a child', as in my childish efforts at drawing, it is much more commonly encountered as a term of contempt applied to an adult, as in the familiar  Don't be ...

chili - correct spelling

chilinoun
Example: We washed down his award-winning chili with cold beer....

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