Found 125 articles starting with F:

facility - correct spelling

facility noun
Example: This new facility will house the company’s IT department....

facsimile - correct spelling

facsimile noun, verb, and adjective
Note: Now universally shortened to fax when referring to an electronic transmission of a document....

factory - correct spelling

factory noun
Example: The glue factory emitted a strange odor....

Factual or Opinionated Style of Writing

...

Fair vs. Fare

Reasonable and just, as in fair treatment.Fair hair is light yellow.Neither good nor bad. Greg is just a fair student.Weather is clear and sunny.An outdoor show of farm products and animals, often with entertainm...

Fair vs. Fare

English language is filled with difficult and puzzling type of words. One of the type of words is homophones that are pronounced the same way but mean and spell differently. The words we are discussing today are one of the common pairs of homophones....

fallacious - correct spelling

fallacious adjective
Example: His argument was fallacious and failed to impress the judge....

fallacy - correct spelling

fallacy noun
Example: His business plan was based on a fallacy and was doomed to failure....

familiar - correct spelling

familiar adjective
Example: His overly familiar advances resulted in a suit for sexual harassment....

farther - correct spelling

farther adverb and adjective
Note: Some usage guides insist that only farther describes physical distance (We walk...

Farther vs. Further

At some point, “farther” and “further” do mean the same thing. Or, more exactly, you can use whichever you prefer, in a certain context. And this is also the point where all confusions and doubts start. “Farther” and “further” have the same meaning o...

farther, further

Some usage guides insist that only farther describes physical distance (We walked farther than we planned). But farther and further have been used...

farther, further - vocabulary

adjective, adverb
Farther: the comparative form of the adjective and adverb f...

fascinate - correct spelling

fascinate verb
Example: This movie will fascinate most audiences....

fascinating - correct spelling

fascinating adjective and verb (present participle of the verb fascinate)Example: The ...

fatigue - correct spelling

fatigue noun
Example: His fatigue caused him to lose the race.Example: The soldier put on his ...

fatuous - vocabulary

adjective
Foolish, inane, silly, especially in a self-satisfied way. I’m sick of the Powder Room. I’m sick of pretending that some fatuous male’s self-important pronouncements are the o...

Favor vs. Favour

Can you do me a favor and bring the grocery bags inside.Favor is a widely used word which can be spelled with or without the u. If you are confused about when to use which favor...

Favor vs. Favour

Languages can shift over time, even in different parts of the world. Many differences in spelling and usage ...

Favorite vs. Favourite

While reading or writing, do you ever pause upon favorite and wonder what the correct spellings of it are? His favorite restaurant is that small place in the suburbs. Or ...

Favour vs. Favor

Are “favour” and “favor” both correct, or is one word a misspelling of the other? These are two of the most confusing words in English, because they are both commonly used in the same contexts, with the same meaning, and many users aren’t sure whethe...

Fawn vs. Faun

Homophones, literally "same sound" are usually defined as words that share the same pronunciation, regardless of how they are spelled. The similarity in the sounds of the homophones...

Fear of Using Pronouns

Pronominal PhobiaAs we conclude our discussion of the seven kinds of pronouns, I should pause to point out a problem with the writing styles of many people, particularly professionals. For some unknown reason,...

feasible - correct spelling

feasible adjective
Example: This plan is simply not feasible....

feat - correct spelling

feat noun
Example: The rescue was an extraordinary feat of courage....

February - correct spelling

February proper noun
Example: I’ll meet you in Key West in February....

feel

Too many people use feel when they mean “think, believe, or maintain.” Consider this passage from Newsweek: She feels that crime prevention must start with helping ...

feet - correct spelling

feet noun
Example: She warmed her feet by the fire....

Felicitate vs Facilitate

Felicitate To felicitate someone means to congratulate someone, give them respect. The word originated from the Latin word ‘felix’ meaning happy which was translate to late Latin ...

Feminine

In English language, a noun may be masculine, feminine or neuter form. Today I will discuss about the femini...

fervor, fervid - vocabulary

noun
Fervor: great warmth or earnestness of feeling; intense heat.adjective
Fervid: intense, heated, or vehement in enthus...

fewer, less

Under the general rule, fewer should be used for plural nouns and things that can actually be counted while less is used for ...

fiancé, fiancée

A fiancé is male; a fiancée is female....

fiat - correct spelling

fiat noun
Example: The government’s fiat ruined the small country’s economy....

Fiber vs. Fibre

Every fiber of her body was throbbing with pain after the crash. ...

Fiction vs. Non Fiction

When looking for books to read, or even in daily conversation, we often read or hear about “fiction” and “non fiction”. A “fiction book”, a “non fiction story”, a fact that is “fiction”… While these concepts are frequently mentioned and approached in...

fictitious - correct spelling

fictitious adjective
Example: The fictitious numbers escaped the scrutiny of the accountants....

fiery - correct spelling

fiery adjective
Not firey.Example: The fiery explosion melted the girders of the building....

File vs. Fill

Fill Fill as we know is to occupy a space with something. For example, fill the bo...

finally - correct spelling

finally adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that discu...

financial - correct spelling

financial adjective
Example: His financial status enabled him to contribute a large sum for the new hospital....

financially - correct spelling

financially adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that d...

financier - correct spelling

financier noun
Example: Her success as a financier attracted the attention of the media....

finite verb

A finite verb is a conjugated verb, which shows tense, person, number, and mood
. The opposite of a finite verb is the ...

Finite Verb

Among many different forms of verbs, finite verbs is one of the less known. You may or may not be aware of i...

Finite Verb - Tense, Person, Number, Mood

A finite verb is just that: finite. It’s finite in time, as in present, past, future, and other time dimensions.Tense, What Is It?When we talk about time in relation to verbs, in grammarian parlance we are talking abo...

First Person

You would have heard a lot of times about the term first person. If you are an English ...

firstly, secondly, thirdly

You should use first, second, and third to show textual enumerations in your writing. Many authorities prefer first, not firstly...

Fish vs. Fishes

Fish vs. Fishes"Fish" and "fishes" represent one of those pairs of almost identical words, that can create a lo...

Five Kinds of Verbs - An Overview

F. Scott Fitzgerald is quoted as saying, “All fine prose is based on the verbs carrying the sentence.”Let’s look back and make certain we all understand the five kinds of verbs. Broadly, we have two groups of main verbs, action and no-action,...

flabbergast - correct spelling

flabbergast verb
Not flabberghast.Example: He wanted to flabbergast the guests with his rude behavior....

Flammable vs. Inflammable

Content about Flammable vs. Inflammable has been temporarily removed......

Flare vs. Flair

Flare" and "flair" are pronounced like they are the same word, with the same signification and spelling. But while their spellings are slightly different, their meanings are actually a lot more distinct. In fact, there is absolutely no similarity or ...

flaunt, flout

Flaunt means “to show off” or “to exhibit shamelessly.” Flout means “to show contempt for, to mock, to show disdain.” Unfortunately, perhaps because flaunt is commonly used...

flight - correct spelling

flight noun
Example: Our flight leaves at 8:30 p.m....

flotation - correct spelling

flotation noun
Not floatation.Example: The flotation of the rubber duck intrigued the baby girl....

flourish - correct spelling

flourish verb
Example: With this education, she should flourish in her career....

Flout vs. Flaunt

He always flaunts about how he flout the rules every time. ...

fluorescent - correct spelling

fluorescent adjective
Example: The fluorescent light burned for hours....

Flush out vs. Flesh out

Flush out” and “flesh out” are two expressions commonly confused and used wrongly. Misspelling them is something quite natural, given the fact that they look so similar and only have one letter distinct. But it’s important to know the difference, cau...

Flyer vs. Flier

Differences between different spellings of English words come from a lot of sources: different meanings, double form acceptance, American or British English variations, diversity of prefixes or suffixes and so on.But no matter their cause, so...

foible - vocabulary

noun
A minor failing or weakness of character; slight defect or flaw. It is the foible especially of American youth,—pretension. The mark of the man of the world is absence of pretension. He...

for

Don’t hesitate to start a sentence with For. It’s a coordinating conjunction, and great writers have been starting sentences with conjunctions for hun...

For vs. Four

Intended to be used on or with. These markers are for posters.Meeting the needs of. I take citamins for my health.Over the time or distance of. We marched for miles.Due to. She has to travel for her job....

forbid vs. prohibit

These words have the same meaning but behave differently. We forbid someone to do something, but we prohibit someone from doing something. It is wrong to confuse the two. With a simple object, however, either verb may be used: "The police forbade dem...

forcibly - correct spelling

forcibly adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that disc...

forego - correct spelling

forego verb
Not forgo
.Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses forgo and forego. ...

Forego vs. Forgo

While some believe that “forego” and “forgo” are perfect synonyms, other claim that they have completely different meanings. If these two paronyms managed to confuse you really badly, then don’t let mixed opinions and different unspecialized explanat...

forego, forgo - vocabulary

verb
Forego: to go before, precede. The past tense is forewent, the past participle foregone.Forgo...

forehead - correct spelling

forehead noun
Example: The baseball hit him on the forehead....

foreign - correct spelling

foreign adjective
Example: The foreign nationals were eager to learn English....

foresee - correct spelling

foresee verb
Example: He failed to foresee the competition in the marketplace....

Foreword vs. Forward

Content about Foreword vs. Forward has been temporarily removed......

forfeit - correct spelling

forfeit verb
Example: This act will cause him to forfeit the deposit....

forgo - correct spelling

forgo verb
Not forego
.Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses forgo and forego. ...

forgo, forego

Forgo means “to abstain from” or “to relinquish something.”Forego means “to go before.” (Note the prefix fore-, as in before).Writers often confuse the two, usually...

formal - correct spelling

formal adjective and noun
Example: The formal dance attracted most of the high-school class. adjective...

Formal or Informal Style

...

former - correct spelling

former adjective
Example: The former mayor then decided to run for Congress....

Former vs. Latter

We already discussed about what "latter" means and when it should be used, in a previous article, where we actually outlined the difference between "latter" and "later" and explained how to make sure you never misspell them. If you think it might be ...

former, latter

You should restrict your use of former and latter to those situations where just two referents are involved. The former is the first one; the latter...

formerly - correct spelling

formerly adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that disc...

formerly, formally

Formerly means “at an earlier time.”Formally means “proper“ or “with official authorization.”Example: Having formerly run the operation as the inter...

Forming the Subjunctive Mood

The English language provides another mood, the subjunctive mood. It was used far more frequently in the olden days. In modern times, we use it mainly to show:1. situations contrary to fact 2. wishes 3. suppositions 4. commands 5. suggestions...

Forth vs. Fourth

Forth vs. FourthGenerally, words that sound identical and have very similar spellings create confusion among En...

fortunate - correct spelling

fortunate adjective and noun
Example: He made a fortunate investment at just the right time. adjective...

forty - correct spelling

forty noun, proper noun, and adjective
Example: He retired at forty. noun...

Forty vs. Fourty

Forty vs. FourtyDerivation is one of the four means of word formation and probably the most imp...

fought - correct spelling

fought verb (past tense and past participle of the verb fight)Example: He fought ...

Found vs. Founded

Find Find as a ...

Four Principal Parts or Forms of Verbs

Drink, Drank, Drunk, DrinkingMain verbs appear in four different forms:1. infinitive 2. finite 3. present participle 4. past participleIn Miss Hamrick’s class, we learned the principal p...

fourteen - correct spelling

fourteen noun and adjective
Example: At the age of fourteen, he drove his father’s truck. noun...

fourth - correct spelling

fourth adjective
Example: In the fourth and final act, the king met his demise....

fourth, forth

Fourth is the one between third and fifth.Forth means “forward” or “onward.”Example: After their fourth year of college, most students will graduate...

fragment

A sentence fragment is a single word or a group of words that does not qualify as a complete grammatical sentence
. It might be a dependent clause written as a complete sentence. Or it might simp...

frequent - correct spelling

frequent adjective
Example: The bus makes frequent stops in the airport....

Frequently Asked Questions

A lot or Alot?
A or An?
...

Frequently Misspelled Words

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friend - correct spelling

friend noun
Example: His friend gave him emotional support in his time of need....

fright - correct spelling

fright noun
Example: The audience could sense the fright in the upcoming scene....

frightening - correct spelling

frightening adjective and verb (present participle of the verb frighten)Example: The frightening plot transfixed ...

fuelling - correct spelling

fuelling verb (present participle of the verb fuel)Example: He was fuelling h...

Fuelling vs. Fueling

The mystery of the spellings of certain words causes a lot of confusion for beginners of English language as they are unable to distinguish between the two. Consider the following s...

Fulfil vs. Fulfill

Say you were asked to make a sentence with expectation and you wrote this: Getting an A on the test did not fulfil her expectations While proofreading it, did you pause at fu...

fulfill - correct spelling

fulfill verb
Example: Their architectural plans must fulfill the expectations of the review board....

fundamental - correct spelling

fundamental adjective and noun
Example: A free press is fundamental to a free society. adjective...

fundamentally - correct spelling

fundamentally adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that...

fungible - vocabulary

adjective
Usually used to describe goods of a nature or kind that may be freely exchangeable or replaceable for others of like kind or nature. In finance, fungible assets refers to securities or commodities th...

further - correct spelling

further adverb, adjective, and verb
Note: Some usage guides insist that only farther describes physical distance (We wal...

further to your letter

All writers should junk this expression.See enclosed please find, please find enclosed, encl...

Further vs. Farther

Further research is necessary. ...

furtive - vocabulary

adjective
Done or taken or used surreptitiously, on the sly; shifty. We are a sad lot, the cell biologists. Like the furtive collectors of stolen art, we are forced to be lonely admirer...

fused participle

The great grammarian Henry Fowler coined the term fused participle. The structure consists of a noun or pronoun followed by a present participle, that is, an ‑i...

Fused Participle - Noun or Pronoun and -ing Phrase

Get ready for a can of worms, for we are about to discuss what Henry Fowler called fused participles.Compare these two sentences:1. She cannot tolerate a baby ...

Fused Participle - Solutions

Whenever you use a noun or pronoun followed by an ‑ing verb, you must figure out whether the issue of the fused participle even arises. Figure out what noun function you need in your sentence. Is it a direct object? An object of a prepositio...

Future Continuous Tense

Early learners of English language come across tenses and have to master them before moving further with the...

Future Indefinite Tense

Tenses hold the pillars of English grammar and keep it standing. Without tenses, English or any other langua...

Future Perfect Continuous Tense

Tenses refer to the part of English grammar that contribute to the format...

Future Perfect Tense

Tenses are the main component of English grammar which contribute to the ...

future tense

The future tense shows actions or states of being that will occur in the future. Please note, however, that we can show futurity in other ways as well. The simple present tense can show futurity: The game begins tonig...

Future Tense - How to Form

When the activity you describe isn’t happening right now (present tense) and didn’t happen yesterday (past tense), perhaps it’ll take place tomorrow (future tense).Other Ways of Expressing FuturityIn English, we have ...

Future vs Feature

Future Perhaps, we use the word ‘future’ everyday to refer to what is going to happen next. Future is a time after the present (now). In English (and other languages), future is a...

future-perfect progressive tense

There are six progressive tenses. Some grammarians refer to the progressive tense as the progressive aspect of a verb. The progressive tense shows an “ongoingness” of the action denoted by the verb.The progressive tense is formed by ...

future-perfect tense

The perfect tenses are formed by using the auxiliary verb to have and adding the past participle of the main verb
. Thus, the future perfect is for...

future-progressive tense

There are six progressive tenses. Some grammarians refer to the progressive tense as the progressive aspect of a verb. The progressive tense shows an “ongoingness” of the action denoted by the verb.The progressive tense is formed by ...

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