Found 181 articles starting with E:

E.g. vs. I.e.

E.g. vs. I.e.Abbreviations are always a great solution for people who type or write fast and need to shorten th...

e.g., i.e.

Both abbreviations are actually for Latin, not English words.Id est (i.e.) is Latin for “that is.”Exempli gratia (e.g.) is the Latin “for example.”If the ph...

Eager vs. Anxious

Content about Eager vs. Anxious has been temporarily removed......

earnest - correct spelling

earnest adjective and noun
Example: The earnest young worker received a Christmas bonus. adjective...

easily - correct spelling

easily adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here ...

easy - correct spelling

easy adjective
Example: Learning how to spell is easy.Example: Now we’re on ...

Eatable vs. Edible

With “eatable” and “edible”, it is clear that the matter isn’t about similar spelling or about doubting whether one word is correct and the other is wrong, invented or misspelled. Both words are known as correct, and probably every English user can d...

ebullient - vocabulary

ebullient - adjective
Showing enthusiasm or exhilaration of feeling; excited; high-spirited. The world was kept informed of Pavarotti's joie de vivre, his ebullient flirtatio...

eccentric - vocabulary

eccentric - noun
One who goes his own way and cares little about the norm.adjective
Deviating from customary or recognized character; erratic; odd; peculiar. An insi...

Economical vs. Economics

Not wasteful.The study of the way money, goods, and services are made and used in a society; the study of wealth....

Economize vs. Economy

To cut down on spending in order to save money.The way a country runs its industry, trade, and finance.The careful use of money and other things to cut down on waste....

ecstasy - correct spelling

ecstasy noun
Example: His ecstasy caused him to shout with glee....

ecstatic - correct spelling

ecstatic adjective
Example: After the thrilling performance, the audience was ecstatic....

education - correct spelling

education noun
Example: He wanted to further his education by attending night school....

Education vs. Experience: Where to Place What, Where on Your Resume

When it comes to deciding if you should place education before experience or vice versa on your resume, the truth of the matter is that it depends on a number of considerations. ...

efface - vocabulary

efface - verb
To wipe out, do away with, obliterate, expunge, as in She effaced her most dreadful memories.Note: The related terms self-effacement and self-effacing mean...

effect - correct spelling

effect noun and verb
Not affect (which is usually a verb, but sometimes a noun). For a discussion of affect vs. effect...

Effect vs. Affect

The cause and effect story ...

Effective vs. Affective

Another pair of words that can generate a lot of confusion if used wrongly, is represented by “effective” and “affective”. Misspelling or replacing them one with the other is an often mistake, easy to make, because the only difference between them is...

effete - vocabulary

effete - adjective
Lacking in wholesome vigor, degenerate, decadent; exhausted of energy or support, worn out. A spirit of national masochism prevails, encouraged by an effete corps o...

efficacious - vocabulary

efficacious - adjective
Capable of having the desired result; effective as a method, means, or remedy.Note: The noun form efficacy means effectiveness. For exampl...

Efficacy vs. Efficiency

If you find it hard to remember when to use "efficacy" and when "efficiency" is preferred, then the explanations we prepared for you below will certainly help you. In fact, it is actually easy to remember when you are spelling it correctly and when i...

efficiency - correct spelling

efficiency noun
Example: The new computer system increased the company’s efficiency....

efficient - correct spelling

efficient adjective
Example: The efficient workers increased the company’s productivity....

effrontery - vocabulary

effrontery - noun
Unblushing impudence or boldness; barefaced audacity; “nerve.”Note: Do not confuse the noun effrontery with the verb and ...

Egg on Your Face

This Grammar eBook explores the most prevalent grammatical mistakes people make. Each mistake is thoroughly discussed and illustrated with examples in the media and on the Internet.Here's a list of The Top 25 Grammatical Mistakes...

egoism, egotism - vocabulary

egoism, egotism - noun
Egoism: a philosophical doctrine that morality has its foundations in self-interest.Egotism: an excessive preoccupation with self. ...

egregious - vocabulary

egregious - adjective
Extraordinary in a bad way, glaring, flagrant, as in an egregious violation of the law. On Jan. 31, 1996, the city ordered the tenants of a Harlem brownstone to move out...

eight - correct spelling

eight noun
Example: She loved her eight grandchildren....

eighth - correct spelling

eighth adjective and noun
Example: This was the eighth time he won the lottery. adjective...

either - correct spelling

either adjective, adverb, pronoun, and correlative conjunction
Example: You may sit on ...

Either vs. Neither

Either vs. Neither"Either" and "neither" represent a pair of words frequently used in the English vocabulary. But these two can be used in so many different contexts that their meanings can become confusing. In addition, they are also ...

Either-Neither-Both

1. With too and so respectively Differences between Either and too (both either and too are used at the end of a sentence) – ...

Elder vs. Elderly

Older.Old....

Elicit vs Illicit

Elicit Elicit is a verb which means t...

Elicit vs. Illicit

Elicit” and “illicit” are different spellings for the same concept? They seem to be, according to how similarly they are pronounced, and to the fact that somehow, they both refer to something related to information, in various contexts. Seems fair en...

elicit, illicit

Elicit is a verb that means “to draw out.”Illicit is an adjective describing unlawful or underhanded behavior or a...

elicit, illicit - vocabulary

Elicit: verb, to draw out, to bring forth, to call forth or provoke.Illicit: adjective, not legally perm...

eligibility - correct spelling

eligibility noun
Example: He increased his eligibility for the loan by taking on two jobs....

eligible - correct spelling

eligible adjective and noun
Example: He stands out among the eligible candidates as the one likely to win. ...

eliminate - correct spelling

eliminate verb
Example: We should eliminate him from the list of prospects....

Ellipses

Punctuation is the basic element of English grammar and without it a sentence is not only incomplete but als...

elliptical clause

A useful power structure is the elliptical clause, also called a truncated clause. The structure consists of a subordinating conjunction (if, though, although, when, while, and many ...

elliptical expression

An elliptical expression is a group of words with certain understood words omitted. Good writers routinely use elliptical expressions. You may punctuate elliptical expressions in two ways: (1) begin the expression with a semicolon, and then insert a ...

Elliptical Sentence

In English language a lot of complex words and forms exist which are not so commonly known by native English...

elucidate - vocabulary

verb
To bring out more clearly the facts concerning; to make lucid or clear. The chief element in the art of statesmanship under modern conditions is the ability to elucidate the confused an...

elude, allude - vocabulary

verb
Elude: to evade the search or pursuit of by dexterity or artifice; to escape capture. Also, to escape the understanding of, as in The answer eluded me.Allude:...

Em Dashes - No Spaces

No spaces come before and after the dash. The dash—a most effective punctuation mark—halts readers in their tracks.  Previous: En and Em Dashes ...

emaciate - vocabulary

verb
To waste away in flesh, to make abnormally lean. Often used as a verbal adjective, as in After his diet, he looked emaciated. It never entered his head to analyse the d...

email - correct spelling

email noun and verb
Note: Spelled email, e-mail, and E-mail. By using email and omitting the hyphen, you will avoid having the word wrap at t...

email, e-mail, E-mail

Here’s a usage note from Dictionary.com
: The transition from World Wide Web site to Web site to website as a single uncapitalized word mirrors the dev...

emanate - vocabulary

verb
To flow out of, to proceed, as from a source, as in The light emanated from the lamp. As the struggle proceeded for making the ruling power emanate from the periodical choice o...

embarrass - correct spelling

embarrass verb
Spell with two "r's" and two "s's."Example: He tried to embarrass her in front of her coworkers....

embarrassment - correct spelling

embarrassment noun
Example: His offensive behavior was an embarrassment to the hosts....

Embed vs. Imbed

Content about Embed vs. Imbed has been temporarily removed......

embezzle - correct spelling

embezzle verb
Example: He tried to embezzle funds from the charity....

embezzler - correct spelling

embezzler noun
Example: The embezzler skipped town with $100,000 of the charity’s money. ...

emergency - correct spelling

emergency noun
Example: The governor declared a state of emergency....

emigrate, immigrate - vocabulary

verb
Emigrate: to move out of a country.Immigrate: to come into a country.noun
Emigration: th...

Eminent vs. Imminent

Probably seeing them in their written form, “eminent” and “imminent” aren’t very confusing; but once you hear them in conversations, you’ll realize that these words are more similar than you expected. Sounding almost identical, “eminent” and “imminen...

eminent, imminent

Eminent means “prominent” or “great.”Something is imminent if it is “impending” or “about to occur.”Example: The spectators rose to their feet as the eminent...

eminent, imminent - vocabulary

adjective
Eminent: high in station or rank, prominent, distinguished; prominent; conspicuous. To show the highest in stature, use preeminent (no hyphen).In law, the power of ...

Empathic vs. Empathetic

Content about Empathic vs. Empathetic has been temporarily removed......

empathy, sympathy

To feel empathy means "to understand another’s feelings or situation." When you feel empathy for others, you “stand in their shoes” and feel what they’re feeling.If you show symp...

emperor - correct spelling

emperor noun
Example: Julius Caesar was emperor of Rome and died on March 15 in 44 B.C. when he was murdered by a group led by Cassius and Brutus....

emphasis - correct spelling

emphasis noun
Example: His emphasis on perfection motivated his staff....

Emphasise vs. Emphasize

Emphasise” and “emphasize” are causing quite a lot of controversial opinions and discussions. Some claim that “emphasise” is the misspelling of “emphasize”, others say it’s vice versa, and other believe both forms are correct. So, who’s right? How ar...

emphasize - correct spelling

emphasize verb
Example: We should emphasize the importance of this project....

Emphasize vs. Emphasise

Emphasis" is a usual noun, commonly chosen to express the particular meaning or importance of something. But what is the verb for this word? Is it "to emphasize" or "to emphasise"?You might think that one of them is misspelled and the other i...

Employ vs. Deploy

Employ Employ is a verb that comes from the middle English imploy and means to give work to someone and pay for it. For exam...

Emu vs. Emulsion

A large bird from Australia that is related to the ostrich.A mixture of two liquids in which the particles of one liquid mix with the other liquid but don't dissolve.A light-sensitive chemical coating on came...

emulate - vocabulary

verb
To imitate with the intent to equal or surpass. Gentlemen, I had hoped you might emulate your Saxon forefathers, who thought it not creditable to be unprepared for anything....

En and Em Dashes

Types of DashesThere are several kinds of dashes, differing from one another in length. There are en dashes (short), em dashes (medium), and 2‑ and 3‑em dashes (long). The term em dash is a printer's term meaning the...

Encase vs. Incase

The doubts created by the pair of words “encase” and “incase” are a normal effect of their similarity in pronunciation and writing. Words that are spelled almost identically often create confusions and are used wrongly, maybe inappropriately repla...

enclosed please find, please find enclosed, enclosed herewith

Boot out all these expressions from your language. In the words of Bryan Garner, they are “archaic deadwood.” Garner, Oxford, p. 124.Instead, try these on for size: Here are the reports you wanted. I enclose ...

Enclosed vs. Inclosed

What "enclosed" means probably anybody knows. If not, we'll explain it immediately below. There's nothing difficult about it. What is, anyway, questionable and often confusing, is the correct spelling of this word. If you check literature and publica...

enclosure - correct spelling

enclosure noun
Example: The enclosure in his back yard protected his neighbors from his pit bull....

encouragement - correct spelling

encouragement noun
Example: Her mother’s encouragement led to her success as an opera star....

encouraging - correct spelling

encouraging verb (present participle of the verb encourage) and adjective
Example: She was ...

endeavor - correct spelling

endeavor noun and verb
Example: His endeavor to become a doctor began in college. noun
Exampl...

Endeavor vs. Endeavour

Endeavor vs. EndeavourIf you are asking whether "endeavor" or "endeavour" is a misspelling, then you should kno...

endemic - vocabulary

adjective
Characteristic of or natural to a particular place or people; indigenous; native; belonging exclusively to or confined to particular place. Dr. Hooker has recently shown that in the S.E. corne...

Endemic vs. Epidemic

Content about Endemic vs. Epidemic has been temporarily removed......

Ending a Sentence

Spaces Following a PeriodIn word-processed documents, two spaces traditionally follow a sentence-ending period. In documents destined for typesetting, however, ordinarily only one space appears after sentence-ending punctuati...

Ending a Sentence or Clause with a Preposition

Yet Another MythHere we have another myth, which I briefly mentioned in the section on prepositions:Never end a sentence or clause with a preposition. Actually, a sound rule would urge you to ...

enemy - correct spelling

enemy noun
Example: The new enemy was the powerful drug lords....

enervate - vocabulary

verb
To render ineffective or inoperative; to deprive of strength or force; to weaken.Note: Do not confuse enervate with invigorate. The two words...

engineer - correct spelling

engineer noun and verb
Example: He worked as an electrical engineer for IBM. noun
Example: ...

English - correct spelling

English proper noun and adjective
Example: The English love their pubs. proper noun
Exam...

English line graph

The line graph depicts anticipations regarding how many students will study three major languages in the world over a decade between 2020 and 2030.Overall, what stands out from the graph is that there will be steady upward trends in the number of stu...

enhance - vocabulary

verb
To intensify, to raise to a higher degree, to magnify; to raise the value of. Baseball, he determined, would be an excellent hobby. “No sense a man’s working his fool head off. I’m going out to the Game...

enigma - vocabulary

noun
An inexplicable occurrence or situation, puzzling; a person of puzzling character; a question, saying, or picture with a hidden meaning, a riddle. I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a ...

enmity - vocabulary

noun
A feeling or condition of animosity, hatred, ill will. Between men and women there is no friendship possible. There is passion, enmity, worship, love, but no friendship....

ennoble - vocabulary

verb
To dignify, to elevate in degree or respect; to exalt; to confer nobility upon. [S]uffering does not ennoble. It destroys. To resist destruction, self-hatred, or lifelong hopelessness, ...

enormity, enormousness - vocabulary

noun
Enormity: outrageous or heinous character; largeness of size, immensity.Enormousness: largeness of size or scope.Note: Use enormo...

enormous - correct spelling

enormous adjective
Grammar.com's section on Problem Words discusses enormousness and enormity. Click h...

enormousness, enormity

These words may both be used to describe something that is “very large.” But enormity has recently begun to take on strongly negative connotations. Enormity implies that something is both “...

enough - correct spelling

enough adjective, adverb, pronoun, and interjection
Example: She has enough...

Enquire vs. Inquire

She inquired about the library charges...

Enquiry vs. Inquiry

Content about Enquiry vs. Inquiry has been temporarily removed......

Enrol vs. Enroll

Enrol vs. Enroll...

ensure, insure, assure

Most writers use these words interchangeably.But there are some differences. For example, assure is used only in reference to people. You assure your boss. If you insure...

entirely - correct spelling

entirely adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that disc...

Entitled vs. Titled

Sometimes, using the right expression for your message can be difficult, especially if there are more similar words referring to the same thing. But the solution to these confusions is simple: you have to understand what each word represents and in w...

entrance - correct spelling

entrance noun and verb
Example: The new owners installed spotlights to shine on the entrance to their house. nou...

entrepreneur - correct spelling

entrepreneur noun
Example: The entrepreneur started many new businesses before one finally succeeded....

envelop - correct spelling

envelop verb
Not envelope (which is a noun
).Example: He wanted to ...

Envelop vs. Envelope

He tore open the envelope as he was enveloped in anguish. ...

envelope - correct spelling

envelope noun
Not envelop (which is a verb
).Example: He put the check in the ...

environment - correct spelling

environment noun
Example: The exhaust from the huge trucks harms the environment....

Envision vs. Invision

You certainly know what "envision" means, it's not the definition of the word that creates confusions and doubts here, but the spelling. And that's what we're about to discuss in this article. Are both "envision" and "invision" correct? If that's wha...

Envoy vs. Convoy

Both convoy and envoy are nouns. Convoy can be used as a verb too, as we will see later in the article.  Envoy Envoy is derived from the old French word ‘...

epiphany - vocabulary

noun
A sudden appearance or bodily manifestation of a deity; a sudden, intuitive perception of the essential meaning or significance of something, usually initiated by a commonplace occurrence.Note:...

epithet - vocabulary

noun
Any word or phrase applied to a person or thing and used to describe an actual or attributed quality, as in The Great Communicator used to describe Ronald Reagan or man’s best friend used to describe ...

epitome - vocabulary

noun
A person or thing that is typical of or represents to a high degree the attributes of an entire class; a summary or abstract of a larger literary work.Note: The word epitome does not m...

equable, equitable

The word equable means “even, tranquil, level.” The word equitable derives from equity and means “fair, just, or relating to a court of equity.”Example: ...

equanimity - vocabulary

noun
Emotional or mental stability or composure, especially when tensed or strained; calm. We could not help contrasting the equanimity of Nature with the bustle and impatience of man. His w...

equipment - correct spelling

equipment noun
Example: He bought all new computer equipment....

equipped - correct spelling

equipped verb (past tense and past participle of the verb equip)Example: They equipped...

equity - vocabulary

noun
Characterized by fairness. In law, the term courts of equity refers to a parallel system of courts in England and, later, the United States, that could give remedies deemed inadequate in courts of law...

equivalent - correct spelling

equivalent adjective and noun
Example: His new TV was equivalent to mine. adjective...

equivocal - vocabulary

verb
Equivocate: To hedge, to utter ambiguous statements, to use unclear expressions.adjective
Equivocal: Ambiguous, open to more than one i...

err - correct spelling

err verb
Example: “To err is human, to forgive divine.” *Example: We will err...

erudition, erudite - vocabulary

noun
Erudition: deep, extensive knowledge and learning.adjective
Erudite: characterized by great knowledge and learning. ...

eschew - vocabulary

verb
To stay away from, to avoid, to abstain from. Revelry rules the roost on New Year's Eve, but there are those who value fine dining more than noise-making. Many of Long Island's best restaurants are plan...

especially - correct spelling

especially adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that di...

Essence vs. Essential

Essence Essence is a noun that refers to the quality of something that determines its uniqueness or character, or a gist of something. For example,      •  The essence of this skit is ...

essential - correct spelling

essential adjective and noun
Example: The ability to write is essential to your success. adjective...

estimable - vocabulary

adjective
Worthy of respect, deserving esteem and admiration. But this is truly a wonderful occasion, the culmination of years of hard work and remarkable generosity, and all of which was due to the goo...

Ethics vs. Morals

Content about Ethics vs. Morals has been temporarily removed......

Eulogy vs. Elegy

Content about Eulogy vs. Elegy has been temporarily removed......

euphemism - vocabulary

noun
A figure of speech by which a less offensive phrase is substituted to convey a harsh thought. For example, pass away is a euphemism for die. Euphemisms abound...

euphemism vs. euphuism

A euphemism is an inoffensive expression used in place of one which may be considered offensive or vulgar. But euphuism is an absurdly overblown and affected style of writing....

Evade vs. Invade

Evade ...

Eve vs. Even vs. Evening

Evening (noun) – is the time between afternoon and night. The exact time can vary, but essentially it is the time from 4pm-7pm...

evening - correct spelling

evening noun
Example: They sat on their front porch every evening....

everyday, every day

Everyday is an adjective used to describe things that are “common” or “ordinary.”Every day describes things that happen daily; it’s a ...

evident - correct spelling

evident adjective
Example: His red face made his anger evident to all....

evince - vocabulary

verb
To make manifest or evident; to show clearly, to prove; to reveal the possession of a quality or trait. Presidents and prime ministers everywhere, I suspect, sometimes wonder how history will deal with ...

evoke - vocabulary

verb
To call up or summon forth memories or feelings; to elicit, draw forth; to summon. Railroad iron is a magician’s rod, in its power to evoke the sleeping energies of land and water....

Evoke vs. Invoke

Evoke vs. InvokeOnly because they end in the same four letters ("-voke"), it doesn't mean that "evoke" and "inv...

Evoke vs. Invoke vs. Provoke

Evoke Evoke means to recall a memory. It could be related to old incidents or emotions. Evoking ‘something’ is not a cons...

ewe - correct spelling

ewe noun
Example: My grandchildren love to look at the ewe and the baby lambs....

exaggerate - correct spelling

exaggerate verb
Example: He always seems to exaggerate his abilities and successes....

exaggeration - correct spelling

exaggeration noun
Example: The candidate’s promises were a complete exaggeration of the truth....

examine - correct spelling

examine verb
Example: The doctor planned to examine the patient carefully....

Examples of Nondangling Participles

Check out these examples. Notice that the introductory adjective points directly to the grammatical subject: Enacted in 1964, the Civil Rights Act transferred power to the federal gov...

exceed - correct spelling

exceed verb
Example: The results will exceed our expectations....

Exceed vs. Accede

Their loyalty exceeds their national bonds. ...

excellence - correct spelling

excellence noun
Example: The supervisor insisted on excellence from all her staff....

excellent - correct spelling

excellent adjective
Example: These excellent results will impress the voters....

except - correct spelling

except preposition, subordinating conjunction, and verb
Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses except and accept. ...

exceptional - correct spelling

exceptional adjective
Example: Her exceptional children received full academic scholarships....

Exclamation Mark

Punctuation is the basic element of English grammar and without it a sentence is not only inc...

Exclamation Point Goes Inside

Sometimes the exclamation point goes inside the closing quotations marks. The man cried out: "Fire! There's a fire! Call 911!" (Exclamation point that's part of the quotation goes inside. Notice that no additional pun...

Exclamation Point Goes Outside

Sometimes the exclamation point goes outside the closing quotations marks. When 911 took the call, the operator said, "I'm on a break now"! (Exclamation point showing the writer's exclamation goes outside the ending q...

execrable - vocabulary

adjective
Abominable, detestable, abhorrent; very bad. But is an enemy so execrable that though in captivity his wishes and comforts are to be disregarded and even crossed? I think not....

exercise - correct spelling

exercise noun and verb
Not excercise.Example: His lack of exercise caused him to gain weight. n...

exhaust - correct spelling

exhaust noun and verb
Example: The car’s exhaust fouled the air. noun
Example: We wi...

exhausted - correct spelling

exhausted adjective and verb (past tense and past participle of the verb exhaust)Example: He was ...

exhaustion - correct spelling

exhaustion noun
Example: The athlete’s exhaustion caused him to faint....

exhilarate - correct spelling

exhilarate verb
Example: The enthusiastic speaker will exhilarate the crowd....

exhilaration - correct spelling

exhilaration noun
Example: The spectators applauded with exhilaration....

existence - correct spelling

existence noun
Not existance.Example: They worked for a better existence....

existent - correct spelling

existent adjective
Example: He searched for any existent errors in the document....

exorbitant - correct spelling

exorbitant adjective
Example: The exorbitant fees prompted us to find a new accountant....

expense - correct spelling

expense noun and verb
Example: The cost of his computer was a legitimate business expense. noun...

experience - correct spelling

experience noun
Example: She lacks the necessary experience for the position....

experiment - correct spelling

experiment noun and verb
Example: The experiment proved the force of gravity. noun
Example: ...

expiate - vocabulary

verb
To atone for, to make amends for, as in to expiate his crimes. “Dolly!” he said, sobbing now; “for mercy's sake, think of the children; they are not to blame! I am to blame, and punish me, make...

explanation - correct spelling

explanation noun
Example: He has no adequate explanation for the company’s loss....

explicate - vocabulary

verb
To make clear or plain; to explain, interpret; to develop a theory or principle. "This book is about life as it is interpreted by books," Edward Mendelson begins. He takes as his subjects Birth, Childho...

Explicit vs. Implicit

Explicit vs. ImplicitHave you ever confused "explicit" for "implicit" in a sentence, or at least wondered wheth...

explicit, implicit

The word explicit means “fully and clearly expressed; leaving nothing implied.” It also means “readily observable,” as in an explicit sign of success. And, of course, explicit...

Expresso vs. Espresso

All coffee lovers and, in fact, most people that have entered a coffee shop, a bar or a restaurant, know what an espresso is. But what is an "expresso"? Some might get confused by this word, knowing that it doesn't appear in any menu, dictionary, pub...

extenuate - vocabulary

verb
To diminish the gravity or importance of an offense, fault, or crime; to underestimate, make light of, underrate.Note: The present parti...

Extortion vs. Blackmail

Content about Extortion vs. Blackmail has been temporarily removed......

extreme - correct spelling

extreme adjective
Example: He answered the door with extreme hostility....

extremely - correct spelling

extremely adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. Click here for that dis...

extricate - vocabulary

verb
To release or free from entanglement, to disengage, usually from a situation. Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm; tell him to moderately rescue his wife from the hands of the rav...

exuberance - correct spelling

exuberance adjective
Example: “But how do we know when irrational exuberance has unduly escalated asset values, which then become subject to un...

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