Found 87 articles starting with L:

L'esprit de l'escalier - vocabulary

This French term describes the predicament everyone has experienced: thinking of the ideal comeback after the moment has passed, indeed, after it’s too late. The term literally translates to “stairway wit,” that is, thinking of the perfect retort whi...

Labelled vs. Labeled

Labelled vs. LabeledRules of past simple tense formation of regular verbs are quite simple and easy to remember...

labor - correct spelling

labor - verb, noun, and adjective
Example: We must labor for long hours if we want to win. ...

Labor vs. Labour

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laboratory - correct spelling

laboratory - noun and adjective
Example: His laboratory uses animals for research. noun...

Labour vs. Labor

English learners are sometimes confused when they see two words with very similar spellings and meanings. They read about them both and when the time comes to use that word in an es...

lackadaisical - vocabulary

adjective
Without vigor, determination, or interest; lethargic; listless; indolent.Note: This word is not pronounced with an x, as in laxadaisical. Start the word with lac...

laid - correct spelling

laid - verb (past tense and past participle of the verb lay)  Note: Grammar.com's section on Problem Words discusses the diff...

language - correct spelling

language - noun
Example: He enjoyed studying the English language....

Last vs. Least

Last ...

later - correct spelling

later - adjective and adverb (comparative form of late)  Example: He decided to take a ...

Lath vs. Lathe

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latter - correct spelling

latter - adjective (with noun usage, e.g., the latter)  Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses latter and former. ...

Latter vs. Ladder

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laudatory, laudable

Laudatory is used to describe something that gives praise and laudable is used to describe something that deserves or receives praise.Example: His ...

laugh - correct spelling

laugh - verb and noun
Example: They will laugh at you when you arrive in that costume. verb...

Lay vs. Lie

The words lay and lie are one the most confusing pa...

lay, lie

The vast majority of people butcher these two words.Quite simply, the word lie is an intransitive verb showing that someone or something is in a reclining po...

Layout vs. Lay out

Layout vs. Lay out"Layout" and "lay out" can easily be confused because they are pronounced perfectly the same ...

Lead vs. Led

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Leaned vs. Leant

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Leaped vs. Leapt

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Learned vs. Learnt

What is the past tense of learn? Consider the follo...

Learning Grammar through kindergarten, Elementary School, Junior High School & Senior High School

English has been taught since I was in kindergarten, there I learned English with fun because the teacher used student center learning, so the teacher facilitate the student with playing game, singing and dancing, thus students memorize vocabula...

led - correct spelling

led - verb (past tense and past participle of the verb lead)  Not lead.Note: The word lead is not t...

led, lead

Note: The differences between led and lead are discussed in the Common Grammatical Mistakes section of Grammar.com. ...

legitimate - correct spelling

legitimate - adjective and verb
Example: He is the legitimate successor to the throne. adjectiv...

leisure - correct spelling

leisure - noun and adjective
Example: After work, we enjoy our leisure. noun
Exam...

Leisure vs. Pleasure

Leisure Leisure is a noun meaning ...

Lend vs. Loan

English has many words that refer to the borrowing of goods and money. Two of the most common words that apply to this context are loan and lend. Do they mean the same thing? Or, ar...

length - correct spelling

length - noun
Example: He used a length of rope to secure the sail.Example: The speaker spoke at some ...

Lens vs. Lense

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lesson - correct spelling

lesson - noun
Example: She learned her lesson well and never went there again....

Lets vs. Let’s

Lets vs. Let's A common misspelling that occurs more and more often is the wrong replacement of "lets" wit...

Let’s fix the title of the chapter …

So our chapter title incorrectly read: “Yesterday, they lead us astray.”But now you know that “led” is the past tense (and the past participle) of “lead.” So our chapter title ...

Let’s now fix the chapter title…

The chapter title read: “If I was you, I’d learn the subjunctive mood.”Quite clearly, I am not you. To state a situation contrary to fact, you need the subjunctive mood. You fo...

liable, libel - vocabulary

adjective
Liable: legally responsible; subject or susceptible to; likely or apt. Note: Liable is often interchangeable with likely i...

liaison

Commonly misspelled laison or liason. The most common pronunciation is lee-ay-zahn with the accent on -ay....

liaison - correct spelling

liaison - noun
Example: She served as the president’s liaison with Congress....

Liar vs. Lier

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Libel vs. Slander

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library - correct spelling

library - noun
Example: The local library provided special programs for small children....

Licence vs. License

Are you licensed to use this machine? ...

license - correct spelling

license - noun and verb
Example: He told the police that his driver’s license had expired. noun...

Lie vs. Lye

Words like lie are considered an irregular verb in the English language. Being a present principle ‘lie’, it refers to being untruthful. However, writing the same word with the alphabet ‘y’ makes it entirely different, giving off a different meaning ...

lieutenant - correct spelling

lieutenant - noun
Example: The U.S. Navy lieutenant received an award for bravery.Example: The crime boss and his ...

light - correct spelling

light - noun, adjective, and verb
Example: She turned out the light and fell asleep. ...

Light vs. Lite

Light vs. LiteYou might download an app on your phone and see it's the "lite" version. Or you might buy a produ...

Lighted vs. Lit

Sometimes, it might be difficult to identify in which cases we should use a word and which cases require the use of another, yet very similar one. "Lighted" and "Lit" are two words in this situation, which can be easily confused.Read this qui...

lightening - correct spelling

lightening - noun and verb (present participle of the verb lighten)  Example: In late pregnancy, a woman experiences her ...

Lightening vs. Lightning

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lightning - correct spelling

lightning - noun, verb, and adjective
Example: The flash of lightning struck the ho...

likelihood - correct spelling

likelihood - noun
Example: The likelihood of her victory increased each day....

likely - correct spelling

likely - adjective and adverb
Grammar.com's section on the Parts of Speech discusses the demise of -ly adverbs. ...

linking verb

A linking verb is also called a copula or copulative verb. It shows no action. Instead, it links the grammatical subject usually to an adjective, sometimes to a noun...

Linking Verbs

In point of fact, the verb to be is also a linking verb. But I prefer to put be in a category all by itself and then treat linking verbs separately. We learned above that the verb to be can connect a grammatical subject to ...

liquefy - correct spelling

liquefy - verb
Not liquify.Example: You should follow the recipe and liquefy the strawberries....

Liquor vs. Liqueur

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List of Adverbs

abnormally absentmindedly ...

List of Homonyms

Note: Some references use the term Homonyms more broadly, to refer to homographs (words spelled the same as each other but pronounced differently) or homophones (words spelled differently but pronounced the same)....

listen - correct spelling

listen - verb
Example: At a railroad crossing, you should stop, look, and listen....

Liter vs. Litre

Have you ever wondered about the spellings of liter? Does writing liter makes you rethink and reconsider how you should spell it for you have come across two types of liter? You are not to be blamed! The word liter exist in two alternative spellin...

literal - correct spelling

literal - adjective
Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses literally and figuratively. Click here for t...

literal - vocabulary

adjective
Involving or being the strict or primary meaning of the word or words; not figurative; not metaphorical; actual or factual, not exaggerated.Note: Many people use literal when...

Literally vs. Figuratively

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literally, figuratively

Many people use literally when they don’t mean it. Presumably, they don’t mean it when they say: “We were literally dead from exhaustion.” They should say: “We felt dead fr...

literature - correct spelling

literature - noun
Example: He preferred American literature....

livelihood - correct spelling

livelihood - noun
Example: The flood threatened the farmer’s livelihood....

loaf - correct spelling

loaf - noun (plural loaves) and verb
Example: She baked a loaf of bread. ...

loan, lend

In formal writing, many writers use loan as a noun form and lend as a verb form. The verb loan is permissi...

Loath vs. Loathe

Elle was loathed to admit that she loathed her mother. ...

Loath vs. Loathe

As I’ve said elsewhere on this site, most of the confusions in language have nothing to do with grammar at a...

loath, loathe

Loath is an adjective that means “unwilling.”Loathe is a verb that means “to dislike or hate.”Exam...

Log In vs. Login

Having access to all types of platforms today on the internet, you have probably seen the words "login" and "log in" so many times before typing your username and password that you can't even count which version you have seen more often. But it can b...

loneliness - correct spelling

loneliness - noun
Example: His total loneliness led to his depression....

Lonely vs. Alone

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Longitude vs. Latitude

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loose - correct spelling

loose - adjective and verb
Not lose
.Grammar.com’s section on Problem Words discusses loose and lose. ...

loose, lose

Lose (pronounced “looz”) means “to misplace” or “to fail to win.” Loose (pronounced “luce”) is the opposite of tight.Some writers incorrectly use loose when they me...

loquacious - vocabulary

adjective
Talkative, tending to talk too much, chattering, babbling, garrulous. I found it not difficult, in the excitement of Mr. Chillip’s own brain, under his potations of negus, to divert his attent...

lose - correct spelling

lose - verb (past tense and past participle is lost)  Not loose
.Grammar.com’s section o...

Lose vs. Loss

Lose and loss are a pair of words that have somewhat similar meanings which cause the most people to confuse them and use them in each other’s place.Today I will discuss the meanings and usage of both these words with examples so learners of ...

losing - correct spelling

losing - verb (present participle of the verb lose)  Example: I am always losing my glasses....

lovely - correct spelling

lovely - adjective and noun
Example: The lovely young woman began her career as an actress. adj...

loyal - correct spelling

loyal - adjective
Example: The loyal attorney refused the offer from the other firm....

loyalty - correct spelling

loyalty - noun
Example: His unbreakable loyalty to his country inspired us all....

luxury - correct spelling

luxury - noun and adjective
Example: He spent a life of luxury on a Caribbean island. noun...

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