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plurale tantum

 A NOUN which is invariably plural in form, even though it may be singular in sense. Examples include oats, cattle, remains, pants, scissors, binoculars, pyjamas, shorts and tweezers. Such nouns are awkward to count: we cannot say *a pants or * ...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

phoney vs. phony

Which spelling is correct? Both are acceptable. British English prefers phoney, while American English prefers phony....

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

snicker vs. snigger

snicker is the American form, snigger is the British form. As simple as that....

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

forbid vs. prohibit

These words have the same meaning but behave differently. We forbid someone to do something, but we prohibit someone from doing something. It is wrong to confuse the two. With a simple object, however, either verb may be used: "The police forbade dem...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

derisive vs. derisory

These words are, in some instances, interchangeable, but not in all cases. We commonly use derisive to mean mocking or contemptuous. Most authorities recognise derisory as an alternative here, although it is not recommended. More commonly, we use der...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

imposter vs. impostor

The spellings imposter and impostor are both widely used, and both are acceptable, but some authorities prefer impostor.  ...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

Bosphorus vs. Bosporus

Both Bosporus and Bosphorus are acceptable spellings for the narrow, natural strait and internationally significant waterway located in northwestern Turkey. ...

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

euphemism vs. euphuism

A euphemism is an inoffensive expression used in place of one which may be considered offensive or vulgar. But euphuism is an absurdly overblown and affected style of writing....

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

"A" and "AN" - How to use?

Hi friends,The general rule is that, “an” is to be used before a vowel and “a” is to beUsed before a consonant.This rule is applicable in most of the situations.But in some cases the word “an” is used before consonant and at the same time...

added by ahilankan
3 months ago

Why is Learning Foreign Languages Exciting?

At school, we learn a foreign language for several years, in most cases, because of the academic program. For our age and brief life experience, we underestimate the importance of knowing a different language and speaking fluently in it. Following gr...

added by acronimous
3 months ago

saccharin vs. saccharine

The artificial sweetener is saccharin; the adjective meaning 'sugary' or 'excessively sweet' is saccharine....

added by Robert_Haigh
3 months ago

racket vs. racquet

 The bat used in playing tennis and related games is either a racket or a racquet. Both forms are standard, so use either. However, the game resembling squash is always rackets in British English but racquets in American English....

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

show vs. shew

Professor R. L. Trask (Ph.D. in linguistics) has the following to say on show and shew: Except in quotations and in certain legal contexts, the spelling shew for show is now obsolete and should not be used. The past tense of show is always showe...

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

sulphur vs. sulfur

For many years there has existed a difference in the spelling for the name of element number 16 with the symbol S. British English spelt it "sulphur" while North American English used the phonetic spelling "sulfur". In the late 20thC, the Internation...

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

government vs. administration

In Britain, a government is the tenure of a particular prime minister, or the people who hold office during that tenure, as in the Blair government. The American equivalent is administration, as in the Obama administration. In the US, the g...

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

despite vs. in spite of

These are equivalent in meaning. "The event went ahead despite the weather." "The event went ahead in spite of the weather."...

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

neologism

A neologism is a newly coined word, or a new use for an old word. An example of a neologism is the word webinar, for a seminar on the web or the Internet....

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

optimal vs. optimum

Both of these are technical terms in certain mathematical disciplines. Optimal and optimum both mean “best possible” or “most favorable.” Optimal is used solely as an adjective, as in “optimal method of completion, while optimum functions a...

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

normality vs. normalcy

Until recently normality was the established word, and normalcy was frowned upon by advocates of careful writing. Nowadays, however, normalcy is gaining momentum and is (almost) regarded as an accepted alternative to normality....

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

crimson vs. scarlet

Crimson denotes a deep shade of red. Scarlet denotes a bright shade of red....

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

comic, comical

Something is comic if it is intended to be funny. The word is mainly applied to skits, songs, plays and the like. "Tom Lehrer was famous for his comic songs."Something is comical if it is unintentionally funny. "Her portrayal of Ophelia was comical."...

added by Robert_Haigh
4 months ago

Rules For Using Single Quotation Marks

When it comes to punctuation rules, even the most experienced writers have hesitations. These rules are vague. So, if you found yourself doubting whether you need that quotation mark and which one should go there, read the following recommendations. ...

added by acronimous
4 months ago

Active Voice vs. Passive Voice

Active and passive voice sounds like something complex and complicated, but really, it's not. It's about the relation existing between the subject and the action of a sentence, more exactly about who does what. But the best way to understand these is...

added by malza
5 months ago

Come get it vs. Come and get it

Some expressions are so often used on the internet wrongly, that they start to seem right and, sometimes, they actually become acceptable, at least informally. “Come get it” and “come and get it” is one of these examples – they are expressi...

added by malza
6 months ago

Use of the word southern

please share your quote for replacing the portion of the fence bordering your property's southern border...

added by Bgj721
6 months ago

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